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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Surrey, England
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    I don't mean dangerous - but the screen is trying to amplify/gain up when there is nothing to see so it will be trying it's hardest to amplify no light.
    From an engineering point of view - I don't like to push anything to the limit for a sustained period. In low light the screen gains up to compensate - that is normal use. Also - my camera is set to auto shut off after a preset time to preserve the battery.
    To leave it on and trying to amplify darkness for such a long time, in my opinion, is running it into the unknown as far as how it will react. So therefore I say that I wouldn't like to 'put my A-200 through that kind of test. I would expect any camera to start to play up after that kind of treatement! '
    Does that make sense??
    Under 'normal' use I find no anomolies with the screen - except as previously mentioned - it is a bit on the blue side of neutral which I have to remember to take into account when reviewing photos just on the screen.

    Geoff
    Geoff Chandler. UK/England/Surrey
    NIKON D90 / D80. Nikon 16 - 85 VR, Tamron 28-200,
    Sigma 70-300APO, Tokina 100 AT-X Pro D.
    SB600 flash. Panasonic DMC-TZ25

    http://geof777.multiply.com

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    10
    Oh well, now I see your point, but
    That's why I made my post with use of exact 1), 2), ....

    So, if you look at 2), you will see it is exactly for 'turning off amplifycation' of the video signal'! There is pure test without additional gaining up. I did this test with using of possible narrow 'dimentions'.

    So please, I'll be VERY thankfull to you if you will do it for me...
    Just dont sure yet... sould I go to the the service centre! Please!!

    Btw, about LCD's colors. It seems to me it has lack of blue when in live monitoring mode. So in reviewing mode it really may seem having more of blue. All in all I see very big difference of its colors between these two modes, despite I have a color problems in green-red detection in my eyes.

    George

    PS. I showed my camera in the Minolta servise already and they said me there is not a problem with it... but I know how they are eager to take anything being under a warranty period for repair! I purchased one A200 before I changed it on this second I have now. The first camera had very noticeble blurrrr in the left corners in maximum zoom. Defect was very observable (for me but not for them!).
    Last edited by Sym Heo; 11-26-2005 at 04:26 AM.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Surrey, England
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    I have to admit to being a little confused.
    Are you telling me that you normally do this to your camera??
    Does the problem ever surface in normal use??
    I know many devices when put though extraordinary use will do
    out of the ordinary things.
    I am still not willing to put my camera through this test - it doesn't cause
    me any problems right now - if doing this causes a problem to arise
    then I may be stuck with a problem. By not making it ever happen - it may
    never happen at all. By making it happen - could cause a weakness or a
    problem that I then need to get fixed... does all that make sense??
    As for colours - normally the screen is very slightly blue in all modes - but
    only very slightly. My default settings (not the cameras) return the same
    apearance with the preview and the photo after - s at least I have consistency.
    Good luck with your problem.
    Geoff Chandler. UK/England/Surrey
    NIKON D90 / D80. Nikon 16 - 85 VR, Tamron 28-200,
    Sigma 70-300APO, Tokina 100 AT-X Pro D.
    SB600 flash. Panasonic DMC-TZ25

    http://geof777.multiply.com

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff Chandler
    I have to admit to being a little confused.
    Are you telling me that you normally do this to your camera??
    You got me being not little confuzed but a lot!

    Normally "do this" to my camera? - do *what*???
    Yes. I normally use the LCD monitor in my work constantly around 30 minutes per a session!!! Is this the thing that confuses you so?
    Do you mean you dont use LCD monitor not longer then per a 5 min at once or so?
    I wonder, is my english so ugly that you can not understand that I'm talking actually NOT about the "test" but about NORMAL photo-session, with only difference that is:
    A) look at the LCD screen first right after turning camera on with Lens cap covered, and see how it is black, and
    D) enjoy your photosession 30 minutes (is it too much?) then cover on Lens cap again and look at the LCD again. Is this still as pure black as before?
    Thats all!

    I'm very apologizing if my English is incorrect here, really, it may be, and if I named what I did "the test" at all.

    Thank you again for your answer.

  5. #45
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    Jan 2005
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    Surrey, England
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    Ahh - I though you meant to switch on - with the lens cap on - and leave it on ~ with the contrast down ~ for 30 or 40 mins. - That's what I meant by
    'Normally do this to your camera'
    Actually I rarely use the monitor as I prefer the EVF.
    And I only have the camera on for a minute or two usually.
    I am suprised, also, that you have the contrast down.
    I experimented with mine and decided to stick with it at 0, +1 or +2
    depending on the situation.
    Anyway - if the screen is on for a prolonged period I would imagine a
    mark might apear on it from it being on for a prolonged period - try it with your television - watch a frozen image from video - after the screen has been on a while - then switch the lights off and turn off the TV - you may find a slight odd glow on the screen - residual effect of the light - also you can do this with the TV off - shine a light on it then switch off all the lights and the screen will glow for a while - maybe your camera screen is doing something a bit similar??
    Geoff Chandler. UK/England/Surrey
    NIKON D90 / D80. Nikon 16 - 85 VR, Tamron 28-200,
    Sigma 70-300APO, Tokina 100 AT-X Pro D.
    SB600 flash. Panasonic DMC-TZ25

    http://geof777.multiply.com

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    10
    Yes this is really similar and like I can see on TV screan.
    Well, I hope really this is peculiar to the internal physics of this model and is not a defect. But I had noticed it right after i had began to use AC adapter cause the battery life didnt suite my sessions. I was thinking maybe that may be the AC adapter dependence. but I try the battery and it remains. I made conclusion this effect is not correspondes to LCD monitor but to the video signal processes of semiconductors 'before' the LCD. All in all I tryed to use to work with it even for much more prolonged time and made sure this effect does NOT increase. This means that effect acheaves its maximum and goes to be stable.

    BTW, interesting opinion about contrast settings. As for me, I came to conclusion, when I set contrast less then default, I can see more 'range of dynamics', I can see more gradations of gray in pictures. Of course image may look more expressive with contrast set to +X.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    61

    VEry interesting conversation

    Hello Geoff and Sym,
    Very interesting conversation indeed. Today is April 4 so there's been no further discussion for some time. I will say that my own approach to "toys" like this is that you can never expect them to work as expected and you'd better use them minimally if you want to avoid trouble. Any trouble is just too much trouble for me so I go out of my way to NOT do anything I don't really need to do with my A200. I do that with everything in life, actually.

    Hello Everyone,
    Anyway, if anyone is reading this, I was wondering if anyone had any problems with picture sharpness at full (7x) zoom. One reason I bought this camera is because it provides an alternative for higher zoom by allowing cropping of images due to large number of pixels. I think that when I do zoom in on an image to 100% (i.e., no on-the-fly resampling), the focus/sharpness just isn't there. This includes images taken at 1/1000s exposure, not just on-the-edge shots. Iplan to do some testing but wondered if anyone had already done so. Is the lens okay?
    Rob
    Konica Minolta A200
    Canon A570IS

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Surrey, England
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    Actually - having lived with it now for over a year, I have no worries really in
    that respect. OK, yes - like any other point and shoot it does hesitate sometimes and also sometimes doesn't like to focus on a virticle when in portrait mode.
    As for focus generally - it's nearly always wonderful, natural and generally crisp.
    I have to say that, in general, the sharpest images are found at F5.6. That said - on the more telephoto images wher depth of field is less - the sharpness is still good at larger (lower number) appartures - this might be because of the telephoto effect highlighting the 'in focus' parts - but I think it's just a think with the lens. I always try for f5.6 as a starting point for nice crisp photos.
    I pressed the centre button and selected the small rectangle for focusing - you can also select the small crosshairs - that one is more precise for point of focus - but generally you can point the recatangle at the bit you want sharpest. The larger rectangle in blue is less good and I think this is where people have the problem.
    Yes you can sharpen - but I shy away from it as I find the A-200 very natural - I set the sharpness on Hard. but the photo on Natural - not vivid and not portrait. Then I have the contrast up +1 and the saturation up +1 except where I wish to vary it slightly.
    Colour? Auto White is best throughout winter - but gets a tad on the Red side in the summer. Daylight White is better in the summer but a touch greeny yellow in the Winter - either are pretty good - of course manual white is the best. I vary between 1 step towards the blue and in the middle with the digital filter.

    On the digital zoom issue - I would advice not to use it much - or at all!
    I did an experiment with full zoom and 2x digital - vs a full zoom photo cropped using my PC software the later was sharper.

    I hope some of this info helps you.

    Geoff Chandler
    Geoff Chandler. UK/England/Surrey
    NIKON D90 / D80. Nikon 16 - 85 VR, Tamron 28-200,
    Sigma 70-300APO, Tokina 100 AT-X Pro D.
    SB600 flash. Panasonic DMC-TZ25

    http://geof777.multiply.com

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    61
    Well, it's a year later and I'm still not happy with this A200. I was out taking photos of aircraft landing at Montreal airport (CYUL) and nearly every one was sooooooo soooooooft and fuzzy. I tried all kinds of focus methods and zooms and etc. The best photos were the result of doing a half-shutter press to lock focus on some nearby object, then reframing on the aircraft, but even those were nothing like the nice shiny aircraft photos you see on the Internet. If I had money and time, I'd try different cameras, but this beast cost a lot!!! and I assumed it would handle pretty difficult situations. Poor lens maybe?
    (Or poor photographer!)
    Last edited by Rob vdKam; 05-09-2007 at 03:11 PM.
    Konica Minolta A200
    Canon A570IS

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Surrey, England
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    The lens is good.
    The image quality is good below 200 ISO
    I believe it has different focus modes Single AF, or Continuous AF
    There is also the Auto focus point (Flex Focus point ??)
    or spot focusing of any portion of the frame. I ended up using the
    crossed hairs - maybe at times slower if the subject was off to one side - but quite accurate.
    See attached image from Steves Digicams
    This is a point and shoot camera though. As such it can be slow to focus and shoot which is frustrating - this is true of most point and shoots though.
    The A-200 is bad at focusing in low contrast or bright situations - such as lots of sky. Sometimes rotating it 90degrees will help. I found it not good in these areas. Once my daughter put her fish in the bath while she cleaned the tank ~ the A-200 completely refused to focus with all that white, my old Olympus C-740 struggled but succeeded where the A-200 failed. So it does have some limitations.

    With planes in the sky however - manual focus at, or near infinity, and a reasonable F-stop of 5.6 or better above. (F8 is very nice!) Should work and also speed up the shooting. (no waiting for the focus)

    I would try that and I reckon you would get the results you wanted.
    Last edited by Geoff Chandler; 05-19-2007 at 11:12 AM.
    Geoff Chandler. UK/England/Surrey
    NIKON D90 / D80. Nikon 16 - 85 VR, Tamron 28-200,
    Sigma 70-300APO, Tokina 100 AT-X Pro D.
    SB600 flash. Panasonic DMC-TZ25

    http://geof777.multiply.com

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