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  1. #1
    zupperphish Guest

    D70 - Moire Concerns

    First post.

    Hi,

    Interested to pick up the D70 after having a browse around the shops today and then I came onto the dcresource webpage and had a look; the price difference between EOS300D and D70 around here meant I could/should actually pick up a D80 - The D70 reads like a top camera and I know if I pick one up, it should be good for years to come. Cutting to my one one concern then,

    I've seen no posts on this forum about moire problems on the D70; is this still the case now that the camera has been out for yonks. Any user experiences on how the camera handles moire and how many shots you've taken that has had this?

    I guess that's it. Any advice for a soon-to-be (less than 24-48 hrs to go) owner of a brand new D70? Any thing I should be aware of?

    Bob

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Monterey Bay
    Posts
    6,029
    Quote Originally Posted by zupperphish
    First post.

    Hi,

    Interested to pick up the D70 after having a browse around the shops today and then I came onto the dcresource webpage and had a look; the price difference between EOS300D and D70 around here meant I could/should actually pick up a D80 - The D70 reads like a top camera and I know if I pick one up, it should be good for years to come. Cutting to my one one concern then,

    I've seen no posts on this forum about moire problems on the D70; is this still the case now that the camera has been out for yonks. Any user experiences on how the camera handles moire and how many shots you've taken that has had this?

    I guess that's it. Any advice for a soon-to-be (less than 24-48 hrs to go) owner of a brand new D70? Any thing I should be aware of?

    Bob
    Moire is not a big issue as very few shots exhibit this characteristic, and it is easily removed by postprocessing. Unless you shoot a lot of screen doors or fine cross-hatch patterns it shouldn't be a problem.

    You should be aware of the settings in Auto mode. There are still several things that you can control in auto that will affect the pictures like ISO left in auto mode, and white balance.

    Use Jeffs review of the D70 as a quick guide to settings. Worked for me (thanks Jeff).

    And use P (program mode) to teach you how to set up shots in manual. The D70 is still one of the best light/exposure meters around.
    Last edited by D70FAN; 01-03-2005 at 02:10 PM.
    D7000, D70, CP990, CP900, FE.
    50mm f/1.8, Sigma 18-125, Sigma 24-70 f/2.8, Nikon 18-105 VR, Nikon 55-200 VR, Nikon 43-86 f/3.5 AiS, Vivitar 28-90 F/2.8-3.5 Macro, Vivitar 75-205 F/3.8-4.8, SB800.
    Ha! See, I can change...


    http://d70fan.smugmug.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    40
    Don't worry about moire. I've shot close to 11,000 shots on my D70 so far and have seen it twice, and neither ruined the shot.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by George Riehm
    Moire is not a big issue as very few shots exhibit this characteristic, and it is easily removed by postprocessing. Unless you shoot a lot of screen doors or fine cross-hatch patterns it shouldn't be a problem.

    You should be aware of the settings in Auto mode. There are still several things that you can control in auto that will affect the pictures like ISO left in auto mode, and white balance.

    Use Jeffs review of the D70 as a quick guide to settings. Worked for me (thanks Jeff).

    And use P (program mode) to teach you how to set up shots in manual. The D70 is still one of the best light/exposure meters around.
    Hmm, Just for fun I tried to play with moire .... I used Adone Photoshop 7.0 but I did not managed to get rid of it. My guess would be to use power spectrum (fast-Fourier transform - FFT) and band pass filter to get rid off noise pattern like that. However, I could not find that in APS7.0

    Any suggestion?

    Cheers,
    R

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    16

    More photo editing

    ... well, similar (photo editing) question :
    I read about enhancing dynamic range of your pictures using exposure bracketing (series of under- and over-exposed frames) and "combing" these pictures; see http://www.dpreview.com/learn/?/Glos...cketing_01.htm

    Does anyone know what "combining" means?

    Thanks,
    R.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Monterey Bay
    Posts
    6,029
    Quote Originally Posted by radek_42
    Hmm, Just for fun I tried to play with moire .... I used Adone Photoshop 7.0 but I did not managed to get rid of it. My guess would be to use power spectrum (fast-Fourier transform - FFT) and band pass filter to get rid off noise pattern like that. However, I could not find that in APS7.0

    Any suggestion?

    Cheers,
    R
    It really depends on where the moire appears, but in a small area I generally just pinpoint the spot and desaturate slightly. I'm not sure that you can totally get rid of the effect but you can minimize it. As I have said before, from my experiece, and the subjects I shoot it is really rare, and not the problem everyone originally thought it would be.

    If you are shooting add-copy for a window/door screen manufacturer, then you might want to review each shot, and change position or lens settings.

    If this is of great concern to those of you considering a dSLR (and it shouldn't be) then buy something else. There are a good number of dSLR's out there to choose from, some better, some not. I haven't tried them all, but I'm working on it.
    D7000, D70, CP990, CP900, FE.
    50mm f/1.8, Sigma 18-125, Sigma 24-70 f/2.8, Nikon 18-105 VR, Nikon 55-200 VR, Nikon 43-86 f/3.5 AiS, Vivitar 28-90 F/2.8-3.5 Macro, Vivitar 75-205 F/3.8-4.8, SB800.
    Ha! See, I can change...


    http://d70fan.smugmug.com/

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