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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    7

    Wide Angle converters

    I don't really need all the features of an SLR, but I need a very wide-angle lens for indoor photography for real estate. I am considering a Pentax *ist with an 18-55mm lens. I am also considering purchasing a 0.5 wide angle converter, which screws onto the front of the lens like a filter, to get even a wider angle.

    Is there any reason why this wouldn't work? Would it cause really bad barrel distortion or something?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    884
    Quote Originally Posted by MadDogMike
    I don't really need all the features of an SLR, but I need a very wide-angle lens for indoor photography for real estate. I am considering a Pentax *ist with an 18-55mm lens. I am also considering purchasing a 0.5 wide angle converter, which screws onto the front of the lens like a filter, to get even a wider angle.

    Is there any reason why this wouldn't work? Would it cause really bad barrel distortion or something?
    Those wide angle converters aren't meant for SLRs (except on ebay LOL)...

    It would work, but obviously degrade the image quality..
    ------
    Joel - Canon 50d, EF16-35/2.8 Mk1, Σ 50/1.4, EF100/2.8 Macro, EF70-200/4 IS, 430EX II
    http://www.eisner.id.au

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by jeisner
    Those wide angle converters aren't meant for SLRs (except on ebay LOL)...

    It would work, but obviously degrade the image quality..
    If not for SLRs, what are they for? The one's I'm talking about screw on the threaded accessory ring. They certainly wouldn't fit a point-and-shoot type digital camera.

    As for the degradation, how bad are we talking? I'm just shooting 640x480 pics for web sites & virtual tours. I'm currently using a point-and-shoot digital camera with this little clip-on wide angle converter. I think the photos still look good enough. It's just awkward and the lens causes shadows from the flash.

    I'm looking for the most cost-effective way to get very wide angle without having to buy some $1,000+ lens.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    884
    Quote Originally Posted by MadDogMike
    If not for SLRs, what are they for? The one's I'm talking about screw on the threaded accessory ring. They certainly wouldn't fit a point-and-shoot type digital camera.
    They are made for prosumer cameras (like the FZ20) and video cameras..

    I'm looking for the most cost-effective way to get very wide angle without having to buy some $1,000+ lens.
    The cheapest, but still good quality option for pentax is to buy the Zenitar 16mm fisheye (about US$120 new) and use ptlens to correct the distortion (if need be).. This lens is manual focus BTW..

    Or instead of the Pentax 18-55 kit get the Pentax 16-45 (it won't cost you $1000, maybe $200 more than the kit but wider and much better)...
    Last edited by jeisner; 09-05-2006 at 11:47 PM.
    ------
    Joel - Canon 50d, EF16-35/2.8 Mk1, Σ 50/1.4, EF100/2.8 Macro, EF70-200/4 IS, 430EX II
    http://www.eisner.id.au

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,770
    Quote Originally Posted by MadDogMike
    I don't really need all the features of an SLR, but I need a very wide-angle lens for indoor photography for real estate. I am considering a Pentax *ist with an 18-55mm lens. I am also considering purchasing a 0.5 wide angle converter, which screws onto the front of the lens like a filter, to get even a wider angle.

    Is there any reason why this wouldn't work? Would it cause really bad barrel distortion or something?
    Consider DOF (Depth of Field).

    It is how much is in focus at any given time.

    Shallow DOF is desirable for artistic element.

    Sensor size is a factor in computing the DOF. Smaller sensor = deeper DOF.

    For Real Estate interiors, a deeper DOF is likely desirable. That would mean P&S camera. You also want high ISO performance (for low light). So you either want IS or high ISO, but if you get a tripod (or monopod) then IS is not a factor, so that brings it down to Fuji. They have the best high ISO performance of all the P&S's.

    Don't know about wide angle attachments for them.

    I'm by no means a P&S expert and I've never experimented with DOF on a P&S, it's just theoretical.
    Gear List:
    Some links I like: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Brooklyn NY (eight months out of the year), Houston TX and Wichita Kansas
    Posts
    114
    Look for a quality 24mm rectilinear lens. 24mm is about as wide as you can shoot interiors without introducing distortion, which the rectilinear lens corrects.

    .8 screw-on teles do introduce distortion, even an Olympus .8 tele.

    Best again is a 24mm, but it does not have to be a rectilinear lens to work.

    *In a room with a 10' ceiling, make sure the camera is on a tripod; the centerline of the lens is at 5' and the camera dead level to minimize distortion. Otherwise, you'll introduce distortions only a tilt-shift lens could correct.
    *Try shooting in the early evening (warm sun) and use shutter priority (Tv).
    Adjust from there.
    If you intend or need to use flash, again use Tv mode, flash in second curtain sync.

    Go here to see a series of test shots of my Mom’s parlor:
    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/edgree...e2.jpg&.src=ph

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/edgree...e2.jpg&.src=ph

    Some of the brighter (whiter) images are the effect of post processing (color balancing): the others a simple change from ordinary incandescent bulbs to GE “natural” bulbs.
    Shutter priority (1/20th sec.) with camera mounted EOS 540 EZ hotshoe flash: second curtain sync

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,118
    Quote Originally Posted by MadDogMike
    I don't really need all the features of an SLR, but I need a very wide-angle lens for indoor photography for real estate. I am considering a Pentax *ist with an 18-55mm lens. I am also considering purchasing a 0.5 wide angle converter, which screws onto the front of the lens like a filter, to get even a wider angle.

    Is there any reason why this wouldn't work? Would it cause really bad barrel distortion or something?
    An 18mm lens on a dSLR isn't really going to be THAT wide, with the crop factor you are talking about 27mm (when compared to 35mm format). Anything

    If you were considering Pentax - I would suggest the following:
    Pentax Fisheye - Super Wide Angle - 10-17mm = $399 (After $100 MIR)
    Pentax ist dSLR - $800.00

    Another combination (which I would always suggest as I am a Canon fan):
    Canon Rebel XT - $609
    Canon 10-22mm - $689
    or
    Sigma 10-20mm - $499
    or
    Tokina 12-24mm - $499

    The Canon package with a 3rd party lens (Sigma or Tokina) will be about $100 less then the pentax camera. Those 10mm and 12mm lenses will cause a good deal of distortion, however this is easily fixable with a photo editor such as photoshop.
    Hope this helps
    Ken
    Canon dSLR User

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    884
    To the OP I just wanted to point out the two third party lenses suggested in the post above (to go with Canon DSLR) are also available in Pentax mount.. Though the Tokina 12-24 (co-developed with Pentax) is availble as a Pentax original rather than the Tokina badged version..
    ------
    Joel - Canon 50d, EF16-35/2.8 Mk1, Σ 50/1.4, EF100/2.8 Macro, EF70-200/4 IS, 430EX II
    http://www.eisner.id.au

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,590
    As always, just ignore the Ed blurb. And jeisner is right, why not look at a wider lens. Like the 12-24 f4 Pentax.

    You should really look at the Pentax k100D though, if you want a Pentax camera.

    And if you don't want a DSLR, look at the Kodak 880. It has relatively little distortion, goes down to 24mm, and is relatively inexpensive.
    Canon EOS 350D, Tamron SP AF 90mm F/2.8 macro, Sigma 18-50mm F2.8 DC EX, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L USM, Tokina AT-X124 Pro 12-24mm F4, Soligor 1.7x C/D4 DG Teleconvertor, Manfrotto 724B tripod, Canon Powershot S30

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,118
    Quote Originally Posted by jeisner
    To the OP I just wanted to point out the two third party lenses suggested in the post above (to go with Canon DSLR) are also available in Pentax mount.. Though the Tokina 12-24 (co-developed with Pentax) is availble as a Pentax original rather than the Tokina badged version..
    The lenses may be available in a pentax mount, but the rebel XT is cheaper and some would also argue a better camera then the pentax..
    Canon dSLR User

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