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View Full Version : Weird thing in sample photos of S2 and H1



drwhite
06-05-2005, 05:57 PM
Hi there,
I noticed something weird in the sample photos of Sony H1 and Canon S2.
In the photos which include a tele shot of a plane flying high above, right wings of both of these planes seem as if they were cropped off? How could it be? Photoshop or something?

You may say that, that could be because of the angle we are seeing it, but I say no. Check out the pics, esp. the Boeing 747 in the Canon S2 gallery and you will see...

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/powershot_s2-review/IMG_0060-tb.JPG

Bigger size: http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/powershot_s2-review/IMG_0060-pp.JPG

Montana
06-05-2005, 07:09 PM
is that some big time vignetting I am seeing in that shot?

Spadhunter
06-05-2005, 08:37 PM
The jet engine "pods" as they are called, hang the engines down and especially further forward than it apears. This results in the deception of the short wing because of the position of the engine relative to our line-of-sight to the end of the wing. I am an airflane officionado and have seen lots of shots that happened to look like this before. It is just a deception, but at first glance looks odd. In addition, the left wing (right side of frame) appears longer because there is a fin sticking up and out of the wingtip. Because we are below and left of the plane we can't see the fin on the right side. :o)

Alex T.

Jeff Keller
06-05-2005, 11:00 PM
Most modern jets have winglets and I've seen some old 737's with them now too. I think they improve fuel efficiency by reducing drag (someone correct me if I'm wrong here). This picture (http://www.airliners.net/open.file/853343/L/) shows them in more detail. The planes in the photos are the 747-400 and A340-600, both of which have winglets.

Bluedog
06-06-2005, 01:16 AM
LOL ... I took this one on my recent flight home. This is the wing type on the newer Boeing 737.

drwhite
06-06-2005, 04:51 PM
Hey guys, thanks for the info. I see that it really happens as a result of line-of-sight and of course that winglets structure.

Spadhunter
06-06-2005, 10:04 PM
Most modern jets have winglets and I've seen some old 737's with them now too. I think they improve fuel efficiency by reducing drag (someone correct me if I'm wrong here). This picture (http://www.airliners.net/open.file/853343/L/) shows them in more detail. The planes in the photos are the 747-400 and A340-600, both of which have winglets.


Yes, bassically. They make the wing mor efficient because with the swept back wing, some of the wind wants to slide sideways off the wing. This also largely helps make the plane more stable, especially at slow speeds, such as landing, when it approaches stall speed.