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Digideb
04-03-2005, 11:43 AM
Spring has sprung & my camera & I have been spending alot more time in the garden. I thought it would be fun to share some pix here & invite input. :)
I'm using my little Olympus C-60 I bought a few months ago. Most of my pix are taken spontaneously & without a tripod. I use Macro mode alot, but I usually get my tripod when I use Super Macro Mode.
I tend to mostly rely on Auto Mode & let the camera "do the work". I have played with "spot metering" a bit & some "scene modes". I prefer to work with natural lighting (no flash) most of the time.
I hope this Calla lily pic turns out as nice here, as it prints. I took this yesterday morning as the sun illuminated the sillouette of the central flower spike & spider within.

Digideb
04-03-2005, 12:09 PM
I took this pic later in the morning in brighter sunlight. I was impressed with the way the sun was shimmering on the Iris petals & hoped to capture it.
Of course, according to the "Murphy's Law of Garden Photography" this beautiful Iris was entwined in an ugly chicken-wire fence, so tried to fill the frame with flower as much as I could. I think the mossy fencepost looks OK, though.
One thing I've recently learned is that the silver vs. black camera debate is about more than fashion. I think my little silver Oly is beautiful but, in shots like this, where I'm shooting towards the sun, my camera will cast shiny reflections on my subject. It can be overcome most times, but it makes getting the shot more challenging. So, now I see there's a "real" reason why "fancy" cameras are black. ;)
Well, I've still got alot to learn & advice is appreciated. :)

ricekiller2003
04-03-2005, 12:11 PM
That's really nice! Especially for a handheld :D

speaklightly
04-03-2005, 12:30 PM
Digideb-

I am assumming these were taken with Olympus C-60, would that be coreect? You some nice side and backlighting effects.

Sarah Joyce

Bluedog
04-03-2005, 01:42 PM
Very nice Deb :)

jeff31
04-03-2005, 01:48 PM
Very nice the Calla lily pic with this sunlight effect :)

Digideb
04-04-2005, 11:17 AM
Thank you all, for your nice comments. :) Yes, all these pix were taken with my little Olympus C-60.
Here's a shot of newly sprouted Japanese Maple leaves in the evening light. I find this is another challenging situation to get a sharp focus while not using flash, in an effort to capture the natural light.
Thankfully, with my digicam, I can take several shots without concern for wasted film & $. I usually use Macro mode so I can get fairly close. The light is changing too quickly to bother with a tripod, so I just try & be as steady as I can & take lots of shots. Usually I get a few good ones in the batch.

BlueGrassGirl
04-04-2005, 11:44 AM
those are really nice photos..

Digideb
04-04-2005, 11:45 AM
Thought I'd post another image from my garden before I log out. I quickly grabbed my camera when I saw this water droplet trapped in the tiny leaf.
This was one of the few shots I've attempted "hand-held" in Super Macro mode. (with my Oly C-60) No place (or time) to set up my mini tripod, so I braced my hands on the small pot this tiny plant is growing in.
For interested gardeners, the plant is the tiniest variegated Hosta called, 'Pandora's Box'.

Bluedog
04-04-2005, 04:05 PM
Very nice job again.

D70FAN
04-05-2005, 10:12 AM
I took this pic later in the morning in brighter sunlight. I was impressed with the way the sun was shimmering on the Iris petals & hoped to capture it.
Of course, according to the "Murphy's Law of Garden Photography" this beautiful Iris was entwined in an ugly chicken-wire fence, so tried to fill the frame with flower as much as I could. I think the mossy fencepost looks OK, though.
One thing I've recently learned is that the silver vs. black camera debate is about more than fashion. I think my little silver Oly is beautiful but, in shots like this, where I'm shooting towards the sun, my camera will cast shiny reflections on my subject. It can be overcome most times, but it makes getting the shot more challenging. So, now I see there's a "real" reason why "fancy" cameras are black. ;)
Well, I've still got alot to learn & advice is appreciated. :)

The C60, in your hands, does a great job. ;)

Garden shooting can be challenging even with a tripod. I would send you some ladybugs, but I don't think California allows immagration from Arizona (ha ha). The local Home depot has bags of ladybugs for sale, but I have half a dozen aligator lizards and some resident ladybugs taking care of my yard already. ;)

I've tried to get pictures of both but they are camera-shy. I'll keep trying...

Digideb
04-06-2005, 10:10 AM
The C60, in your hands, does a great job. ;)

Garden shooting can be challenging even with a tripod. I would send you some ladybugs, but I don't think California allows immagration from Arizona (ha ha). The local Home depot has bags of ladybugs for sale, but I have half a dozen aligator lizards and some resident ladybugs taking care of my yard already. ;)

I've tried to get pictures of both but they are camera-shy. I'll keep trying...
Thanks for your compliment, George. I think you could safely share your ladybugs, here. So, if you "capture" one, feel free to add it to my "Garden". ;) I'm sure I'll be seeing ladybugs soon. We've had lots of butterflies lately, but they've mostly been restless "speed demons", so I haven't gotten any good shots of them, yet. We've also had alligator lizards & I've taken a few shots, but they don't make the most exciting subjects, kind of a "Study in Brown". :) Maybe if I can catch one in good light or against an interesting background, it'll be worth sharing.
It's interesting how similar your flora & fauna is, down there in the desert, compared to ours, up here on the Northern Calif. coast. I know you have a unique environment there. Have you gotten any Cacti flower pix?...maybe a Saguaro?

D70FAN
04-06-2005, 01:02 PM
Thanks for your compliment, George. I think you could safely share your ladybugs, here. So, if you "capture" one, feel free to add it to my "Garden". ;) I'm sure I'll be seeing ladybugs soon. We've had lots of butterflies lately, but they've mostly been restless "speed demons", so I haven't gotten any good shots of them, yet. We've also had alligator lizards & I've taken a few shots, but they don't make the most exciting subjects, kind of a "Study in Brown". :) Maybe if I can catch one in good light or against an interesting background, it'll be worth sharing.
It's interesting how similar your flora & fauna is, down there in the desert, compared to ours, up here on the Northern Calif. coast. I know you have a unique environment there. Have you gotten any Cacti flower pix?...maybe a Saguaro?

The flora and fauna is actually very different, in the desert, and the standard annuals here die in the summer and thrive in the winter. But there really are several desert flowers that thrive in 110 degree heat and easily survive a couple of days at 115+.

It is surprising that in some areas of Tempe (around ASU) it's like being in Palo Alto, and in our area of the Southeastern Valley it's horse ranches, and dairy farms (and of course houses), so it's kind-of like Sacramento. Then in the North Valley around Anthem and even parts of Scottsdale it's classic Arizona deset, with hundreds of desert plants including the indigenous Saguaros. The Sonoran Desert is pretty unique, and I really need to get out and start seriously shooting it. Maybe I'll start a section on my smugmug gallery...

It's really funny, but taking pictures of Saguaro's here is pretty "touristy" and it's like shooting a scrub oak back in California. I am heading out this weekend up to Verde Valley (by Sedona) to a Saguaro "forrest" area up there. The caccti are supposed to be in bloom, so hopefully...

Ladybugs..don't seem to mind the desert either.

Digideb
04-06-2005, 01:26 PM
The flora and fauna is actually very different, in the desert, and the standard annuals here die in the summer and thrive in the winter. But there really are several desert flowers that thrive in 110 degree heat and easily survive a couple of days at 115+.

It is surprising that in some areas of Tempe (around ASU) it's like being in Palo Alto, and in our area of the Southeastern Valley it's horse ranches, and dairy farms (and of course houses), so it's kind-of like Sacramento. Then in the North Valley around Anthem and even parts of Scottsdale it's classic Arizona deset, with hundreds of desert plants including the indigenous Saguaros. The Sonoran Desert is pretty unique, and I really need to get out and start seriously shooting it. Maybe I'll start a section on my smugmug gallery...

It's really funny, but taking pictures of Saguaro's here is pretty "touristy" and it's like shooting a scrub oak back in California. I am heading out this weekend up to Verde Valley (by Sedona) to a Saguaro "forrest" area up there. The caccti are supposed to be in bloom, so hopefully...

Ladybugs..don't seem to mind the desert either.
Yes, George, our environments are very different. I think that's why finding flora & fauna in common is even more amazing.
I was amused by your "touristy" comment. :) It seems the North coast is the "Tourist Capital of the World" & we're all bracing for the increasing onslaught up here, as summer approaches.
After living up here for more than 20 yrs., my new-found love of digital photography has me out looking very much like one of those dreaded "tourists", :o but I don't care!
I can see how shooting the Saguaros would be kinda "touristy" but they are very unique to the rest of us & even as a professional gardener, Saguaros are quite unobtainable (for obvious reasons) for my cacti collection.
I've heard weather conditions, this year, were suppose to be ideal for desert blooms.

Digideb
04-09-2005, 12:06 PM
Well, this isn't in my garden, but I wanted to share this shot I took on my recent trip up to the Pt. Arena lighthouse.
I liked the contrast of this huge, crusty old anchor surrounded by these cheery little wildflowers, called 'Baby Blue Eyes'. I was lucky to have an almost windless day on this exposed bluff to capture these Spring beauties. Most of the time these blooms would literally be vibrating in a gale.
Camera info: Olympus C-60 in Macro mode, hand-held. Comments are welcome. :)

D70FAN
04-09-2005, 01:21 PM
Well, this isn't in my garden, but I wanted to share this shot I took on my recent trip up to the Pt. Arena lighthouse.
I liked the contrast of this huge, crusty old anchor surrounded by these cheery little wildflowers, called 'Baby Blue Eyes'. I was lucky to have an almost windless day on this exposed bluff to capture these Spring beauties. Most of the time these blooms would literally be vibrating in a gale.
Camera info: Olympus C-60 in Macro mode, hand-held. Comments are welcome. :)

Another "framer". Good composition, and contrast.

Digideb
04-18-2005, 09:21 PM
It's been a busy time for us, gardeners, lately & I haven't had much time to play on the computer & this forum. But, I have been ready with my camera & I've captured some North coast classics.
We've had alot of Calif. poppies blooming lately & I'd shot a few, fighting the wind for not-so-great pix, but then I saw this one, perfectly sheltered & backlit, just begging to be photographed.
I used my little Olympus C-60, in Super macro mode. I didn't have a tripod, but I was able to brace myself against a bench & get this shot hand-held.
I always appreciate comments & George, thank you for your nice compliments. I hope many newbies are benefitting from your encouragement as I have. :)

Digideb
04-18-2005, 09:35 PM
Here's one more. I took this about an hour after the Poppy pic. I was 'on a roll' that day. ;)
These Bumblebees were quite active & hard to capture. I wish I could've gotten a closer shot. After about an hour of looking silly, chasing bees around this 'Wild Lilac' (Ceanothus) I finally got three shots that were 'keepers'. :p
Once again, I used my Oly C-60, in Super macro mode, hand-held.