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snaz
03-27-2005, 08:15 PM
What settings should I have used to get the correct exposure? BTW, no tripod was used and the setting info was: ISO 100; TV 1; AV 2.8; auto WB; focal length 20.7 mm shot with canon G6. Major PP was required to get the picture to this point.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v499/nogutsnoglory89/MoonR10.jpg

sherlock
03-27-2005, 08:21 PM
Hey,

To acheive night shots like this, you need slow shutter speeds. Why not try putting your G6 in Tv mode and setting a multi-second exposure? Also, you will most likely need a tripod in these situations if you use a long exposure. Another way to take this shot with not so long shutter speeds would be to increase the iso, but that would cause the deterioration of details due to noise. Your best bet would be to try a longer exposure. Hope all of this makes sense and helps.


Andrew S.

snaz
03-27-2005, 08:38 PM
Makes sense. In fact the night before I tried a tripod and a couple of 2-3 second shuuter speeds, but the moon was too bright that it was overexposed while the rest of the picture was completely dark.

Thanks anyway!

Norm in Fujino
03-27-2005, 09:41 PM
Makes sense. In fact the night before I tried a tripod and a couple of 2-3 second shuuter speeds, but the moon was too bright that it was overexposed while the rest of the picture was completely dark.


The moon shot is extremely difficult; think about it: one bright white spot in the middle of black. That makes an extreme contrast range that no digital camera can easily cover. As you found, you'll either make the moon too bright, or the surrounding trees and fields too dark. One thing to try is lowering the in-camera contrast setting as far as possible before shooting. Use a tripod and shoot at various time settings. Alternately, zoom in on the moon to make it the center of the image and occupy more of the screen (then of course you won't have so much dark trees/fields around it).
Tiffen also has a low-contrast filter that reduces contrast in an image, and it might work (I've never tried it so don't know what kind of results it produces).

jamison55
03-28-2005, 05:22 AM
Use a tripod, so that the camera is locked in place. Take 2 shots, one exposing for the moon, the other exposing for the trees. Combine them in PS :D .

Thalas'shaya
03-28-2005, 10:11 PM
now, i will gladly admit that i know sqat about advanced photography topics like moon shots. however, i am a VERY efficient user of google, and i was poking around looking for something i found on luminous-landscape.com about pictures of the moon, and the google search turned up a few other things besides the one i was looking for. (that turned out to be a great shot of the moon as an illustration of how to use histograms)

so this is info on how to shoot a lunar eclipse... it includes several things that may not be helpful, but it also includes a lot of info on the gear and settings used to achieve the great shots of the moon in eclipse.
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/locations/eclipse-2003.shtml

and this is more generally how to photgraph the moon:
http://home.hiwaay.net/~krcool/Astro/moon/howtophoto/

i googled "Luminous Landscape moon shot" and the above stuff turned up in a Cached version of a page on canon's digital photography forums. the overwhelming advice was to use the "sunny f/16" rule, which i don't understand (i'm a n00b) but i'm sure it'll make sense to me someday. i think as a joke, they said that if you're in southern california, you use the "smoggy f/11" rule instead. i presume that's something to do with pollution in the atmosphere affecting the shot?