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ktixx
03-06-2005, 11:23 PM
I was browsing Fred Miranda's site and i noticed a few of his AMAZING pictures. A couple caught my attention because they looked as if they were computer generated, however I know they were actually captured :

http://www.fredmiranda.com/hosting/showphoto.php?photo=3424&sort=1&size=medium&cat=501

Can anyone give me an idea of how this was done. Specifically the reflections in the water are so crystal clear and the sky is absolutely unreal. I do realize that Fred has a degree in computer graphics, so I am guessing that has something to do with it. Any insight will be much appreciated.

Ken

EAP
03-07-2005, 12:43 AM
I've seen reflections this crystal clear with my own eyes, may times, up in the Sierras. The key to capturing them on film is usually to shoot just after dawn, when there is absolutely no breeze whatsoever to ruffle the water. You need water that is literally as smooth as glass to capture these clear reflections. The lighting is also usually beautiful at this time, as you can see from these photos.

some guy
03-07-2005, 11:08 AM
I'm sure it's retouched using Photoshop or some kinda software.

ktixx
03-07-2005, 02:42 PM
Members on the FM site also asked why the sky was darker than the reflection in the water (No reply as of yet), so I am assuming some major photoshopping was done. Overall it is an amazing picture, whether it was digitally touched up or not. I would just like to know the specifics.
Ken

some guy
03-07-2005, 03:03 PM
with all due respect to fred and miranda as they are top-notch photographers, alot of their pix in fact, most others as well on that forums went through quite a bit of post-processing prior to being posted.

D70FAN
03-07-2005, 03:30 PM
I was browsing Fred Miranda's site and i noticed a few of his AMAZING pictures. A couple caught my attention because they looked as if they were computer generated, however I know they were actually captured :

Can anyone give me an idea of how this was done. Specifically the reflections in the water are so crystal clear and the sky is absolutely unreal. I do realize that Fred has a degree in computer graphics, so I am guessing that has something to do with it. Any insight will be much appreciated.

Ken

While these may have been altered slightly, for effect, it's not all that unusual to find mirrored reflections. Like this:

ktixx
03-07-2005, 03:45 PM
I guess my real question is how is this done. If I were to go to where that picture was shot, would the sky look that dark? would the background look so sureal? Most likely the problem is I have never been out west and I don't have any other pictures to compare this image to. Overall it just seems like it was computer generated, but I know that it was an actual picuture.
Ken

ktixx
03-07-2005, 03:49 PM
with all due respect to fred and miranda as they are top-notch photographers...

Just FYI it is Fred Miranda, He is one person :)

http://www.fredmiranda.com/about/

jamison55
03-07-2005, 03:58 PM
Don't be so quick to judge on the post processing. Most landscape photographers use Grad ND filters to balance out the light in the sky vs the light of the landscape (I actually use one quite a bit when doing LS's), A polarizing filter would also darken the sky, though I'm not sure if he used a polarizer since they usually kill reflection on water...

The quality of the light makes this much easier than you'd think to achieve as well. With a strong sun coming from behind the photographer and illuminating the salt columns, spot metering on the salt columns would darken everything else in relation, giving a nice dark exposure to the sky...

EDIT: After a closer look, I am more certain that he did this with a Polarizing filter and spot meterin on the salt columns. If you look at the shadows, the sun is at a 90 degree angle to the photographer, the perfect angle for the maximum dark sky effect of the polarizer (and the color is consistent with a CP as well). Still not sure about the reflection though...

D70FAN
03-07-2005, 05:14 PM
I guess my real question is how is this done. If I were to go to where that picture was shot, would the sky look that dark? would the background look so sureal? Most likely the problem is I have never been out west and I don't have any other pictures to compare this image to. Overall it just seems like it was computer generated, but I know that it was an actual picuture.
Ken

Time to go west. The columns at Mono Lake are that spectacular, Fred just happened to be there on a spectacular (spring?) day. as is the Colorado River from Desert View at the Grand Canyon, or the 1600 miles of Pacific coast. The Columbia River Gorge, or the Seven Sisters (volcanic peaks including Mt. St. Helens) of the Nothwest. It's endless. Come out and visit us sometime when you have a few years. ;)

New Mexico, Utah, Colorado, Montana, Wyoming, Arizona, California, Oregon, and Washington. If it's west of the Great Divide, it's gonna be exiting. Sometimes we loose track of how fortunate we are.

ktixx
03-07-2005, 05:30 PM
After a closer look, I am more certain that he did this with a Polarizing filter and spot meterin on the salt columns. If you look at the shadows, the sun is at a 90 degree angle to the photographer, the perfect angle for the maximum dark sky effect of the polarizer (and the color is consistent with a CP as well). Still not sure about the reflection though...

You think this might be a double exposure? That could explain the darkness of the sky, the reflection, and why the sky isn't as dark in the reflection.
Ken

ktixx
03-07-2005, 05:31 PM
Time to go west. The columns at Mono Lake are that spectacular, Fred just happened to be there on a spectacular (spring?) day. as is the Colorado River from Desert View at the Grand Canyon, or the 1600 miles of Pacific coast. The Columbia River Gorge, or the Seven Sisters (volcanic peaks including Mt. St. Helens) of the Nothwest. It's endless. Come out and visit us sometime when you have a few years. ;)

New Mexico, Utah, Colorado, Montana, Wyoming, Arizona, California, Oregon, and Washington. If it's west of the Great Divide, it's gonna be exiting. Sometimes we loose track of how fortunate we are.

I definitely plan on it. My new job will have me traveling almost as much as you :p :) That is actually one of the reasons why I am getting into photography, I am sure I will see some amazing things on my trips and I definitely want to be able to capture them.
Ken

D70FAN
03-07-2005, 06:42 PM
I definitely plan on it. My new job will have me traveling almost as much as you :p :) That is actually one of the reasons why I am getting into photography, I am sure I will see some amazing things on my trips and I definitely want to be able to capture them.
Ken

After almost 2.5 million miles I still prefer a window seat. Sometimes the shots are spectacular from 35,000 feet.

Rhys
03-07-2005, 07:29 PM
Somewhere I have a pin sharp photo of trees reflected in water. It's hard to see which is the reflection and which are the trees until one notices a single leaf on the water's surface.

Now that photo was taken on Ektachrome 100 at f1.8 and 1/8th of a second exposure, hand-held with a 50mm lens while I leaned against a tree.

jamison55
03-07-2005, 07:36 PM
You think this might be a double exposure? That could explain the darkness of the sky, the reflection, and why the sky isn't as dark in the reflection.
Ken

Not a double exposure - that would be almost impossible to pull off this perfectly..taking the first, then turning the camera over to take the second. I 'm certain he used a polarizer for the sky in the top half, and it's possible that the rotation of the polarizer that darkens the sky minimized the effect of the reflection on the water, but I'n not sure that the angle of the shot is right for the mountains to be reflected naturally. The mountains seem a little far to appear in the reflection so perfectly...

ktixx
03-07-2005, 09:18 PM
Not a double exposure - that would be almost impossible to pull off this perfectly..taking the first, then turning the camera over to take the second. I 'm certain he used a polarizer for the sky in the top half, and it's possible that the rotation of the polarizer that darkens the sky minimized the effect of the reflection on the water, but I'n not sure that the angle of the shot is right for the mountains to be reflected naturally. The mountains seem a little far to appear in the reflection so perfectly...

Maybe I wasn't using the correct term "Double exposure" but basially what I meant is he took one shot with the polarized filter on, and another with it off, he captured the dark sky and the reflections in the water through 2 different shots, then photoshopped them together.
Ken

EAP
03-07-2005, 11:11 PM
Re: the color of the water, the water in Mono Lake is filled at certain times of the year with hundreds of millions of teenie-tiny brine shrimp, which give the water a brownish color. The natural color of this lake is less than sky-blue, probably having something to do with its extremely high salinity. This lake has a very unusual ecosystem -- it's not your typical inland lake. Just because the water isn't the exact color of the sky doesn't mean this isn't a "real" photo. Sure, it may have had some computer enhancements, but I would be willing to bet the photo hasn't been altered as drastically as you all seem to think.

D70FAN
03-08-2005, 05:30 AM
Re: the color of the water, the water in Mono Lake is filled at certain times of the year with hundreds of millions of teenie-tiny brine shrimp, which give the water a brownish color. The natural color of this lake is less than sky-blue, probably having something to do with its extremely high salinity. This lake has a very unusual ecosystem -- it's not your typical inland lake. Just because the water isn't the exact color of the sky doesn't mean this isn't a "real" photo. Sure, it may have had some computer enhancements, but I would be willing to bet the photo hasn't been altered as drastically as you all seem to think.

I have a tendancy to agree. I have been to Mono and other places on the East Sierra where the sunlight in the high desert can do some amazing tricks.

Either way that's an outstanding picture.