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mugsisme
10-16-2008, 08:46 PM
I took the D90 for a test spin. I partially read the manual. I thought I remembered to set everything. I realized after I came home from a day in the park that I left the camera's w/b on fluorescent light. The first few pictures are a bit too blue, but that is easily corrected. I did not adjust the color saturation. Is the D40 just brighter than the D90? I had to PS each and every picture I liked. (then I had a funky problem where every picture I uploaded to flickr was sideways.) I can set the saturation higher. I was using the new kit lens. It just seemed to me that the pictures didn't pop like on the D40.

I upped the saturation by 30, unsharp-mask her eyes, and volia--
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3026/2948572116_d3823418fc.jpg
My favorite picture of the day.

Did I crop this one too much?
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3235/2947717249_37f4438b1b.jpg

before:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3206/2947792847_77622f5c76.jpg

Oh, I have no idea what I set my video on, but my videos are not so sharp. I have no idea how some people are "noobies" and pick up a camera and take these fantastically sharp, clear pictures, and me, I touch my camera and turn it into poop.

edited to add: My friend said they are very blue. They look fine on my monitor. How do they look on yours?

SpecialK
10-16-2008, 09:24 PM
edited to add: My friend said they are very blue. They look fine on my monitor. How do they look on yours?

They look very blue.

Your post is sort of confusing. You are comparing theses images from the D90 test to ones that I assume are properly exposed and WB'd with a D40? That's not really fair or accurate.

There are all sorts of factors, such as metering method, and other settings you can/should use, or ones you did/should not use.

I would reset to factory settings and try again.

mugsisme
10-16-2008, 09:31 PM
They look very blue.

Your post is sort of confusing. You are comparing theses images from the D90 test to ones that I assume are properly exposed and WB'd with a D40? That's not really fair or accurate.

There are all sorts of factors, such as metering method, and other settings you can/should use, or ones you did/should not use.

I would reset to factory settings and try again.

What about the third one, that isn't post-processed at all? (OK, I did have the w/b wrong, but it was not on tungsen (sp?) w/ flash. I just think my pictures from straight from the D40 were bright, vivid, nice to look at. I might reset and try again.

tim11
10-16-2008, 10:45 PM
They look too blue to me too. As for the video, it's hard to get sharp footage unless you are very proficient with MF. Ahh... and that means good eyesight too.
I'd leave it on Auto WB, unless there is reason to change, and everything else (vivid, saturation, sharpness; etc) at normal.

TheWengler
10-16-2008, 10:53 PM
Yeah, they're blue/purple. I think the D40 has the settings cranked up a little more to keep consumers happy.

K1W1
10-16-2008, 11:13 PM
The the DPReview review for some tips about how to set up the D90 to get better images stright out of the camera.

At least being a girl you partially read the manual. With us boys it would still be unopened in it's little plastic bag. :-)

achuang
10-16-2008, 11:27 PM
Yeah, they're blue/purple. I think the D40 has the settings cranked up a little more to keep consumers happy.

This is correct since the D40 is trying to win over P&S owners who are used to bright, vivid and sharp images straight out of the camera. The D90 is more of an enthusiast camera and the higher end you go the more they leave those settings up to you to do in PP.

They look very blue to me. I don't think you cropped the second shot too much. It's a better crop since he's not right in the middle of the frame.

fionndruinne
10-16-2008, 11:32 PM
Check what color mode your D90 is shooting in. If, for instance, it's AdobeRGB (color mode II), it will be less vivid right off than mode III (sRGB).

If you find you like your photos better with some tweaking of in-camera settings, go for it. Anything that makes for less PP is good. And if I may say so, your photos have been splendid contrast and saturation-wise all along with the D40, so you're definitely not on the wrong track.

Visual Reality
10-17-2008, 03:44 AM
Always shoot in sRGB, and leave the White Balance on Auto. Shoot in RAW so you can adjust the color temperature later :)

erichlund
10-17-2008, 07:54 AM
Why sRGB? First of all, in RAW, it doesn't matter, you can change it to whatever you need for the type of output your going to do in post processing. Secondly, sRGB has one of the smallest color gamuts of any of the available settings. The only time I would shoot in sRGB is if I were shooting in jpg for the web.

VTEC_EATER
10-17-2008, 10:33 AM
Edit: I find the photos to be "cold" and slightly underexposed for my liking. Have you calibrated your monitor lately? That was my biggest problem when I strated using a digital monitor. Stupid thing was so dang bright that I would edit my photos with too much contrast, and they looked like crap on analog monitors. After some tweaks, they are much better. Also, if you are working in photoshop, don't forget to click the "ICC profile: sRGB" box when you save the image. If you are shooting in sRGB on your camera, not checking that box will lead to a bunch of problems. Wrong colors, over-saturation, etc...

I find auto white balance a bit cool for daylight shots, especially if there are people in the photo. I usually set it to cloudy, or will set my own color temperature, like 5250k or something like that, just to get the flesh tones to be more "human."

I find my D300's exposure to be pretty darn good, but on a cloudy day, I have been known to set the exposure compensation to +.7 to get things a bit brighter. It makes for a bit more pop, and a less "dismal/washed out" photo.

I think the D40 can produce amazing photos right out of the camera, but it doesn't offer nearly as much customization that the more advanced bodies have. In general, you will find that the pro-sumer bodies require custom tweaks to your image settings to get them to look how you want them. Your D40, was set up by the factory, and only offered you limited adjustments. Now, you have a camera that was not set up by the factory, and you have to set it all up yourself. It is fun, and frustrating all at the same time.

I have been a bit lazy and really need to sit down with my D300 and edit my "everyday/auto" shooting bank to make for great OOC photos. I don't want to edit my everyday shots anymore. Too much work. I figure if I spend a couple hours tweaking that shooting bank, I will save many hours of post processing down the road.

fionndruinne
10-17-2008, 01:16 PM
Only shoot in sRGB? No way, man. If you use an Adobe editing program (like Lightroom), AdobeRGB is the way to go. You get a lot better latitude in editing color channels, which I've used to good effect, especially with landscapes.

mugsisme
10-17-2008, 01:59 PM
Only shoot in sRGB? No way, man. If you use an Adobe editing program (like Lightroom), AdobeRGB is the way to go. You get a lot better latitude in editing color channels, which I've used to good effect, especially with landscapes.

I am using Gimp. I had the camera set in AdobeRGB, but again, the W/b was set wrong. (I forgot to check it before I left. It was not on auto.)

My kitchen produces pictures that are way too yellow. That is why I lean towards the colder colors I guess.

So, since I use Gimp, does it make a difference what I set it in? I hate using RAW, since I haven't mastered the programs on how to fix the pictures. I was using UFraw for a while. But when we upgraded gimp, I lose uf raw and dh can't get it back on. I had ps on my old laptop, which I gave to my dd. I don't think I ever used it except for once or twice.

Visual Reality
10-17-2008, 02:11 PM
Why sRGB? First of all, in RAW, it doesn't matter, you can change it to whatever you need for the type of output your going to do in post processing. Secondly, sRGB has one of the smallest color gamuts of any of the available settings. The only time I would shoot in sRGB is if I were shooting in jpg for the web.


Only shoot in sRGB? No way, man. If you use an Adobe editing program (like Lightroom), AdobeRGB is the way to go. You get a lot better latitude in editing color channels, which I've used to good effect, especially with landscapes.
If you are printing and you have a color managed workflow, sure. But look at what we are talking about here - photos posted to the web. Your images change when you convert them from AdobeRGB to sRGB for the web and they may not end up how you saw them in your editing process.

That is why I said I always shoot in sRGB. Many people do this and they have no problem with the "small color gamut".

fionndruinne
10-17-2008, 03:29 PM
See, I trust Lightroom to make a good AdobeRGB>sRGB conversion when I save my edited file, along with resizing and quality downsampling for a web photo. I've never had any problems with this system either. What I have found troublesome with shooting AdobeRGB is in doing PP with a different program, like Picasa. If the program's not made to use AdobeRGB, I don't trust it with AdobeRGB anymore, and so will shoot sRGB when I know I don't need the enhanced editing abilities of Lightroom.

Visual Reality
10-17-2008, 03:49 PM
There you have it.

By the way, have you compared before and after side by side to see how noticeable the difference is? I haven't so it would be interesting to see.

My other advice still stands though - always use RAW so you can change white balance/color temperature later in case of errors like this.

swpars
10-18-2008, 12:26 PM
D90 will do RAW + JPEG Fine - which is what I'd use if I had one. If you get a good JPEG - great. If not, convert the RAW file and adjust white balance and color at will.

BTW, on the subject of RAW conversion programs. I used RAWTherapee for a while, which is a pretty power free RAW converter. But after getting Photoshop Elements 6 (less than $100 - and PSE 7 is out now) and downloading the latest version of Adobe Camera RAW, I'm never going back to the free programs for photo editing. It's worth trying out.

K1W1
10-18-2008, 02:28 PM
I am using Gimp. I had the camera set in AdobeRGB,

Leah I think that you need to get into a routine.
What I do (and I suspect others are similar) is make sure that every time I put my camera away it's in a "standard" configuration. That means that when I pick it up days later for a quick happy snap or even to do something interesting then I know where I am starting from.

In my case I always reset the camera to

jpeg
ISO200
Matrix metering
Aperture priority
sRGB
Formatted unused memory card

When I pick the camera up I know where I am and I can almost instinctively change to shutter priority or RAW or where ever if I need to for the situation.

On the subject of memory cards I never leave my camera without one in it. I have 5 or 6 cards and when I have finished for a day I take that days card out and put another one in and format the new card immediately. One benefit of this is that I always have a card in the camera and another is that I have todays photos away from the camera so i can't accidentally format the card or delete the images. Once the images are transferred to my PV the card goes bag into my camera bag.

Rooz
10-19-2008, 05:10 PM
not sure if its already been metioned, didnt see it but the blue cast to these shots is cos the WB was set incorrectly.

on your flickr properties, this set was shot in Cool white fluorescent (W 3900 - 4500K). it has nothing to do with colour mode and all the other techno mumbo jumbo. the awb is very good outdoors. maybe it needs a very fine tweak, but generally its very good. looks like they're shot in jpeg aswell so not sure what your chances are of recovering.

mugsisme
10-19-2008, 05:16 PM
More questions.

3D matrix ... what exactly is it and how is it different from regular matrix metering?

I set the camera's saturation higher. Not being one to understand the word "moderation", I set it up all the way. I think I might have over-done it. What else is new?

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3233/2955645351_42fb09ca83.jpg

I did have my polarized filter on ...
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3179/2955663025_7673575e2e.jpg
BUT, I did use RAW + JPG fine. (The D40 only had raw + jpg basic, which is why I never used it. DH said he did get my plug in to work.)

One thing I have never understood is how shutter speeds work. I used P today. When I tried to use a faster shutter speed, I ended up with a black picture. (I had moved it to S.) Again, this was on P mode. What shutterspeed should I have used to get the water droplets stopped?
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3050/2956491298_d1de56fe97.jpg
That is water spouting up in the middle, but the shutter speed was too slow.
Exposure: 0.013 sec (1/80)
Aperture: f/4
Focal Length: 18 mm
ISO Speed: 400
Exposure Bias: 0/6 EV

There are a few more pictures in my flickr stream. I just sorta feel I have the opposite problem from last week.

OH, before I started typing I put the memory card back into the camera. New rule for me, although my extra cards came, so hopefully I won't be caught without a card again.

K1W1
10-19-2008, 05:38 PM
3D Matrix ties to track the subject that you focussed on as it moves. It has a bias towards skin tones I'm told so if you focus on a person and that person moves the camera will try to keep them in focus until you push the shutter.

Visual Reality
10-19-2008, 06:07 PM
3D Matrix ties to track the subject that you focussed on as it moves. It has a bias towards skin tones I'm told so if you focus on a person and that person moves the camera will try to keep them in focus until you push the shutter.
Not 3D Tracking, 3D Matrix Metering.

Its a method the camera uses to determine exposure.

K1W1
10-19-2008, 08:02 PM
Should have read the question. :confused::o

swpars
10-20-2008, 11:04 AM
Leah,

The 3D Color Matrix metering is the same type of matrix metering as found on your D40. I can't speak for the D90 as I have not used one, but found the D40 needed a little negative exposure compensation (like -0.3 outdoors) to not blow highlights too much when metering in matrix. I use Center-Weighted or Spot depending on the situation. Test and see what works for you.