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View Full Version : Nikon D300 - ISO (on/off)



guntoter
10-10-2008, 05:33 AM
I am helping my friend with her new D300. She is trying to learn how to use it & has a shoot tonight. Her problem is Auto vs Manual ISO. Reading the manual tells how to manually set the ISO to what ever setting you wish, however, the AUTO-ISO remains ON all the time. The manual refers to turning it on or off, however, it doesn't seem to tell you where you turn it on or off. :(
HELP!
Any D300 users out there know the answer to this question? It is probably simple, but Nikon didn't do a very good job of wording their manual.

Rooz
10-10-2008, 06:04 AM
shooting menu - click ok
iso sensitivity settings - click ok
iso sensitivity auto control - select on or off.

i can understand how on/off can be confusing to some people. ;)

guntoter
10-10-2008, 06:05 AM
Well, we kept fooling with the camera & figured out that you can turn it off in the menus. Does anyone know a faster way with this camera to turn Auto-ISO on/off besides having to go into the menu to do it?

Rooz
10-10-2008, 06:10 AM
you can select the iso sensitivity feature to appear in "my menu".

there is no "faster way" to do it apart from using the menu. it cannot be assigned to a function button for one touch operation if thats what you mean. its not exactly something you turn on/off regulalry. personally the only time i ever turn it off is when i use strobes. otherwise its always on.

erichlund
10-10-2008, 07:34 AM
And there's the difference between your D300 and my D200. I'm not confident enough in the high ISO capabilities of the D200 to just let it choose when. So my camera stays on manual ISO. I use higher ISO when I need it, but in actuality, I mostly use the base ISO 100.

TheWengler
10-10-2008, 10:12 AM
I don't let my camera decide anything anymore. It's proved to be a poor decision maker. :(

guntoter
10-10-2008, 10:47 AM
Rooz & TheWengler,
I totaly agree about controlling the ISO myself. In fact, I hardly ever go to Auto mode on anything. I mostly use Aperture priorily (95%) of the time. In my camera, that means you set the ISO. I actually originally posted this message for a friend (Ksuff), but since then she has registered, and will be asking the questions & posting for herself. I am a Canon guy, but I love her D300.

aparmley
10-10-2008, 11:21 AM
Well, we kept fooling with the camera & figured out that you can turn it off in the menus. Does anyone know a faster way with this camera to turn Auto-ISO on/off besides having to go into the menu to do it?

Turn the camera to A, S, or M mode. Thats pretty quick, yah?

guntoter
10-10-2008, 11:56 AM
aparmley,
That approach works with my Canon XTI, but not with the D300. It keeps the Auto-ISO even in those modes, unless you go into the menu and turn it off. If you know anything I am doing wrong that will make it do as you suggested, I would like to know it.
Thanks for the input though.

VTEC_EATER
10-10-2008, 12:15 PM
You can also adjust your custom settings banks. One can be for auto everything, and another for full manual, etc.

In the case of auto-iso vs manual control, I have my camera currently set to manual ISO, but I'm thinking of switching back to auto-ISO. I have only used auto once in my time with the D300, but it worked marvelously. I find it especially nice for shutter priority. Just point and shoot, never worry.

K1W1
10-10-2008, 02:12 PM
One of the great advances of the new Nikon CMOS sensors as in the D300 is their high ISO performance. As I read somewhere recently ISO1600 is the new ISO400 on these cameras.
For the Rodeo application I wouldn't be overly worried about forcing a particular ISO I'd simply limit the camera to whatever high ISO level you want it to use and then let it sort the rest out in relation to the ISO and shutter speeds you are using.
If Rooz is happy to leave his camera on auto ISO then just assume that it works okay and get on with taking great shots to post here. :)

VTEC_EATER
10-10-2008, 02:51 PM
ISO1600

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2407/2255963090_811942033b_o.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2105/2255163721_7cd9659ca1_o.jpg

Both photos received a very, and I mean very, small amount of noise reduction with Neat Image.

Overall, if you hit your exposure correctly, ISO 1600 should need almost no noise reduction.

And in case anyone was wondering, I do not turn the in-camera noise reduction on. Its crap. Neat image is leagues better than the Nikon in-camera algorithms.

Visual Reality
10-10-2008, 03:13 PM
Auto ISO is always on for me - sometimes I turn it off though, but not very often.

josef
10-14-2008, 03:07 PM
I think I'm getting to the point of knowing what a situation calls for better than my camera.. i think (lol).. I was using auto iso for some outdoor stuff (in the woods) recently but the camera would keeping wanting to jump to 1600.. when with VR I could manually ramp it down a bit and get a cleaner, very sharp image at say 800 or 640.. I have also been using a tripod quite a bit lately so I've been trying to stay with ISO 200 as much as possible.

Now I do have the Auto-ISO in my top 3 of "My Menu" for quick access.

VTEC_EATER.. fantastic ISO 1600 shots. I try to limit my post processing but I might need to try some noise reduction software when 1600 is necessary..

K1W1
10-14-2008, 03:24 PM
I have also been using a tripod quite a bit lately so I've been trying to stay with ISO 200 as much as possible.

If you are using a tripod then the game changes completely. No need for VR at all and set the ISO / aperture / shutter speed combination that you want to use for the scene not the one that will simply give you the best hand held result.

Rooz
10-14-2008, 03:33 PM
the camera would keeping wanting to jump to 1600.. when with VR I could manually ramp it down a bit and get a cleaner, very sharp image at say 800 or 640..


josef, the iso will only go to 1600 if it needs to, it wont select a higher iso than what the corect exposure demands.

in the situation you gave shoot in aperture priority, set the aperture you want and then all you need to do is set the minimum shutter speed down and the camera will go down to whatever shutter speed necessary and adjust iso automatically accordingly.

tim11
10-14-2008, 04:47 PM
One lesson I learn from using Auto ISO is - remember to turn it OFF when doing longer shutter shot and tripod.

Visual Reality
10-14-2008, 05:08 PM
One lesson I learn from using Auto ISO is - remember to turn it OFF when doing longer shutter shot and tripod.
Yeah, also turn it off for bracketing for HDR. Instead of using shutter speed to vary the exposures, it changes the ISO instead. So you end up with shots that had their exposure changed by higher and lower ISO...