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500mL
08-01-2008, 10:22 AM
Hi guys,

I'm just wondering, has anyone experienced a lot noise on their D80 when taking shots between ISO 320-400? I took some shots from my gf's cousin's bday party in a hall and a lot of my shots came out like this:

http://lh4.ggpht.com/keenen.brown/SJKrp94qAcI/AAAAAAAACMg/0g2eHI2AD_4/s800/DSC_0757.jpg

I used the High level noise reduction in camera and I was using the SB-600 flash on board. Any idea why I'm getting such results?

swpars
08-01-2008, 10:49 AM
This shot looks a little underexposed, which could be aggravating the noise. What was your exposure compensation set at for the shoot?

With my D40, I usually set mine on -0.3 to -0.7 outdoors but leave it on 0 for indoor shots.

500mL
08-01-2008, 11:11 AM
Swpars,

Yeah that's one of the things I forgot to adjust. My exposure compensation was on -0.3 or -0.7 I think. I should've bumped it up to 0 or 0.7. Thanks.

ColColt
08-01-2008, 01:11 PM
After a lot of experimentation, mine seems to work best inside when using bounced flash when set to +0.3-+0.5. I'm sure that's because the meter sees the light background(wall usually) and quiches the flash a little prematurely. In the sun, 0 works best but, if in shaded areas, +0.3 gives better exposure. I remember when using film, an underexposed pic always showed more "grain" than when properly exposed. It use to be quite popular to underexpose slide film about 1/3 stop to increase the contrast. It worked great with that but not with positive film.

Visual Reality
08-01-2008, 02:19 PM
I always have to use -.3 to -1.0 indoors, my D80 almost always overexposes and since I use A mode it tries to hold the shutter open too long smearing everything. Why? Because it doesn't know what the photographer wants, its just a machine.

Darker areas will show a lot more noise...go take a picture outside at 3pm at ISO1600 and it'll look cleaner than that. My ISO 400 shots indoors look similar to yours, I'd say. That looks cropped too, am I right? That's another thing that will greatly show off the noise.

e_dawg
08-01-2008, 03:37 PM
Part of the problem is that the lighting seems to be tungsten-ish, or red-heavy and blue-deficient. To get the correct WB / colour balance, the blue channel is brought up through gain, which is a contributing factor.

Not sure what your intent was, but if you wanted more overall exposure in your pics to include the background, then use a slower shutter speed. Indoors, I shoot in shutter priority and between 1/15 to 1/30 sec to maximize ambient light capture unless my subject is moving, in which case I have to raise the shutter speed.

Visual Reality
08-01-2008, 04:27 PM
How do you get away with 1/15 or 1/30 when you need to freeze people? I've never been able to pull that off...unless you have some time-slowing powers we don't know about.

500mL
08-01-2008, 04:45 PM
I had my shutter speed set to 1/80 or 1/60 on f3.2. I was actually just trying to get a decent exposure of my subjects and not really care much about the background. I'll try and bump up my exposure next time I take shots indoors. I've tried 1/15 and I get most of my shots blurred with a slight movement.

e_dawg
08-01-2008, 06:18 PM
How do you get away with 1/15 or 1/30 when you need to freeze people? I've never been able to pull that off...unless you have some time-slowing powers we don't know about.

No special powers... that's when my subjects are stationary. If I may quote part of my previous post:

"I shoot in shutter priority and between 1/15 to 1/30 sec to maximize ambient light capture unless my subject is moving, in which case I have to raise the shutter speed." (important qualifier bolded) ;)

Fiasco
08-02-2008, 05:51 PM
Just my 2 cents:

If you raise the ISO on the D80, be sure you don't underexpose or the noise will, for lack of a better word, amplify.

Also I would avoid using the in-camera noise-reduction at all, it tends to give me worse results than just leaving it off.

JTL
08-02-2008, 09:21 PM
I remember reading somewhere a while back that the reason that the non-full stop ISO settings don't look as good as the full stops is because sometimes they are not actual voltage/electrical steps but are actually "emulated" digitally...

truflip
08-02-2008, 11:48 PM
I generally use -2/3 outdoors and 0 indoors to "hide" the noise.