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truflip
07-22-2008, 04:02 PM
Do we have any wedding photographers here using Nikon gear?
Just trying to get some feedback on what lenses are a "must".

Thinking 50mm 1.8, 85 1.8, two SB600's grouped (with softbox/umbrellas) should do but yea, I'm sure I could use some more pointers :) Money is an issue so best value is priority :)

VTEC_EATER
07-22-2008, 05:19 PM
Depending on the size of the church/chapel/location where the ceremony is held, a 70(80)-200/2.8 is a very popular choice. Nice versatility while moving and working with crowds.

Add this to your list, along with your 17-50/2.8, and you have a nice setup for a wedding.

TNB
07-22-2008, 05:19 PM
Here's a link to one of Esoterra's threads. However, his signature appears to be slightly ahead of what has been released at the current moment, i.e. D700.

http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=34220

Daubs
07-23-2008, 09:28 AM
Been nosing around various wedding photog sites. Most have the following in thier camera bag: 70(80)-200mm f/2.8, 50mm f/1.4 or 1.8, mid range 2.8 zoom, nice wide, depending on DX or FX camera.

Flashes are generally the SB800 or 600. Very few use soft-boxes, prefering to remain fast and light. Some use flash bracket, others omni-bounce/fong/etc.

I shadowed a wedding photog this spring and was thinking of getting into more. Started reading on various forums and really feel like I have a LOT to learn before jumping in.

Camerajunkie
07-23-2008, 12:28 PM
I'm shooting my BIL's wedding next month. I'm a wee bit terrified as, well, I've never done it and I want the pictures to turn out GOOD. But I am the best they can afford (free) as they are young and poor.

Maybe I should have invested in an 85mm f/2.8 (is it 2.8 or 1.8?) lens instead of lighting, but I know that lighting is a key difference to shots. I thought a lot about a softbox but I want to be more mobile than that. So I went ahead and bought a sb 800 and plan on slaving my sb 600. I also got a reflective umbrella and stand for when they are wanting more portrait-y shots and then I can use a person (I have a feeling my 11 year old is going to be thrilled to be a flash stand) to hold it when I need to be more mobile.

I'll use my 50 mm when I'm indoors for sure. I've thought a lot about renting another body so if I want zoom, I don't have to switch lenses. Alas, I did mention that I'm free and I already have spent a decent amount to upgrade so the pictures turn out better, so I'll stick with what I've got.

TNB
07-23-2008, 04:59 PM
Some use flash bracket, others omni-bounce/fong/etc.
Personally, I've been surprised by how many "schooled" photographers and wedding photographers I've encountered who don't know what a flash bracket is and wonder why they have "shadows" off to the side in their photos. Then again, I've been in the camera store when people have purchased a dSLR the day before they are going to shoot a wedding, yet have never used a dSLR or any other camera for that matter and then want a crash course on "automatic" or "program" mode at the time of the sale.

jcon
07-23-2008, 06:38 PM
Do we have any wedding photographers here using Nikon gear?
Just trying to get some feedback on what lenses are a "must".

Thinking 50mm 1.8, 85 1.8, two SB600's grouped (with softbox/umbrellas) should do but yea, I'm sure I could use some more pointers :) Money is an issue so best value is priority :)


Youll want to add the 70-200mm F2.8VR. Most places dont allow or frown upon flash during the actual ceremony. So youll want something with reach, VR, and a nice low-light friendly 2.8. Pair that with the 17-55 2.8, and you do have a nice set-up to start off with.

I have found I rarely, if at all use my 50mm 1.8... I also have used(or taken with) a 85mm and also found that sitting in my bad... I prefer the versatility of a quality zoom.

I agree with TNB, a flash bracket is a MUST, but if you are using multiple flashes for the formals, you can use a backlight flash and that will help reduce shadows.

Best of luck... I remember how terrified I was for my first wedding.

jcon
07-23-2008, 06:42 PM
I'm shooting my BIL's wedding next month. I'm a wee bit terrified as, well, I've never done it and I want the pictures to turn out GOOD. But I am the best they can afford (free) as they are young and poor.

Maybe I should have invested in an 85mm f/2.8 (is it 2.8 or 1.8?) lens instead of lighting, but I know that lighting is a key difference to shots. I thought a lot about a softbox but I want to be more mobile than that. So I went ahead and bought a sb 800 and plan on slaving my sb 600. I also got a reflective umbrella and stand for when they are wanting more portrait-y shots and then I can use a person (I have a feeling my 11 year old is going to be thrilled to be a flash stand) to hold it when I need to be more mobile.

I'll use my 50 mm when I'm indoors for sure. I've thought a lot about renting another body so if I want zoom, I don't have to switch lenses. Alas, I did mention that I'm free and I already have spent a decent amount to upgrade so the pictures turn out better, so I'll stick with what I've got.

CJ... what will you use for the actual ceremony? The 50mm could work well, but only if youre up close, which can be tricky and a bit of a distraction to the ceremony. Your idea for the lighting for the formals/posed is a great idea, and you are on the right path, but id strongly suggest thinking about the ceremony and what youll be shooting with for that.. as I mentioned in my last post... youll find flash isnt very popular during the ceremony.

Hope this helps..

Classic96
07-23-2008, 06:44 PM
I use the Demb flash bracket in conjunction with their diffuser setup. I modified the bracket quiet a bit as the design is 75% good, but overall I'm real happy with the results.

truflip
07-24-2008, 02:22 AM
Depending on the size of the church/chapel/location where the ceremony is held, a 70(80)-200/2.8 is a very popular choice. Nice versatility while moving and working with crowds.

Add this to your list, along with your 17-50/2.8, and you have a nice setup for a wedding.

I agree with that. I visited the venue the other day and the main hall where the reception will be at is quite big. I don't mind walking around to get the shot but I think the 70-200 2.8vr will help a lot. I don't have the money for that though so I might have to rent it. Here's the venue:

http://www.wcmcweddings.com/thegallery.htm

click on the photo gallery pic to see the venue by the way.. I might get away with natural light till the sun starts to set.. the windows are quite big but once afternoon sets, the sunlight would be on the opposite side.. so late afternoon, i might need to bring out the flash.

Thanks for the feedback also :)

Here's a link to one of Esoterra's threads. However, his signature appears to be slightly ahead of what has been released at the current moment, i.e. D700.

http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=34220
thanks! I'll have a read there also

Been nosing around various wedding photog sites. Most have the following in thier camera bag: 70(80)-200mm f/2.8, 50mm f/1.4 or 1.8, mid range 2.8 zoom, nice wide, depending on DX or FX camera.

Flashes are generally the SB800 or 600. Very few use soft-boxes, prefering to remain fast and light. Some use flash bracket, others omni-bounce/fong/etc.
I shadowed a wedding photog this spring and was thinking of getting into more. Started reading on various forums and really feel like I have a LOT to learn before jumping in.
Thanks! Was thinking of selling my 17-50 for the 28-75 2.8 but decided to keep it for the wide angle.


I'm shooting my BIL's wedding next month. I'm a wee bit terrified as, well, I've never done it and I want the pictures to turn out GOOD. But I am the best they can afford (free) as they are young and poor.

Maybe I should have invested in an 85mm f/2.8 (is it 2.8 or 1.8?) lens instead of lighting, but I know that lighting is a key difference to shots. I thought a lot about a softbox but I want to be more mobile than that. So I went ahead and bought a sb 800 and plan on slaving my sb 600. I also got a reflective umbrella and stand for when they are wanting more portrait-y shots and then I can use a person (I have a feeling my 11 year old is going to be thrilled to be a flash stand) to hold it when I need to be more mobile.

I'll use my 50 mm when I'm indoors for sure. I've thought a lot about renting another body so if I want zoom, I don't have to switch lenses. Alas, I did mention that I'm free and I already have spent a decent amount to upgrade so the pictures turn out better, so I'll stick with what I've got.

the 85mm u want should be at least the 1.8 :)
I was terrified also at first when I was contacted by the bride to shoot her wedding but after talking more to her, I'm at ease. Very nice lady who really likes my photo style (so that boosts me up) etc.. hopefully, same goes for you and the BIL doesnt put a lot of pressure on you :)

I'm in the process of looking up renting (lens and body) but if insurance is pretty much the cost of the gear, I might just borrow a friends D80 :)


Personally, I've been surprised by how many "schooled" photographers and wedding photographers I've encountered who don't know what a flash bracket is and wonder why they have "shadows" off to the side in their photos. Then again, I've been in the camera store when people have purchased a dSLR the day before they are going to shoot a wedding, yet have never used a dSLR or any other camera for that matter and then want a crash course on "automatic" or "program" mode at the time of the sale.
Yea man, a lot of the sales clerk at local camera stores here seem to be schooled photographers.. they know some stuff but get lost once in a while. Today I went to Henrys and the guy didn't know how to put in a battery on the MBD80 battery grip. All he had to do was line up the grooves.. wtf


Youll want to add the 70-200mm F2.8VR. Most places dont allow or frown upon flash during the actual ceremony. So youll want something with reach, VR, and a nice low-light friendly 2.8. Pair that with the 17-55 2.8, and you do have a nice set-up to start off with.

I have found I rarely, if at all use my 50mm 1.8... I also have used(or taken with) a 85mm and also found that sitting in my bad... I prefer the versatility of a quality zoom.

I agree with TNB, a flash bracket is a MUST, but if you are using multiple flashes for the formals, you can use a backlight flash and that will help reduce shadows.

Best of luck... I remember how terrified I was for my first wedding.
Thanks! I contacted the venue lady to ask about flash photography but I never got a reply about that, lol. From what I've seen on their website though, flash photography should be allowed. BTW, I have the Tamron 17-50.. not the Nikon 17-55, just to avoid confusion :) I don't have VR :(

I'll see what I can do with the 70-200mm though.

Camerajunkie
07-24-2008, 12:01 PM
CJ... what will you use for the actual ceremony? The 50mm could work well, but only if youre up close, which can be tricky and a bit of a distraction to the ceremony. Your idea for the lighting for the formals/posed is a great idea, and you are on the right path, but id strongly suggest thinking about the ceremony and what youll be shooting with for that.. as I mentioned in my last post... youll find flash isnt very popular during the ceremony.

Hope this helps..


I've already cleared with the bride that I will be up close. She said as long as I'm not in her face or blocking the view of the guests, that should be fine. I'll scout it out better the night before the ceremony. Unfortunately they are getting married in St. Louis and we don't live there, so I can't see the venue til I get there.

The GOOD news is that it's outdoors. I'm hoping, hoping, hoping that there is enough light to not have to use the flash during the ceremony. I'd hate to do that. Otherwise my only other option is the 55-200mm. Do you think that's a better option? Because I can't really afford to buy another lens at this point. Unless someone wants to sell me their 70-200 f/2.8 or 85 mm f/1.8 dirt cheap. ;)

rawpaw18
07-24-2008, 08:25 PM
You are not in the neighborhood are you? I forgot where you are.

Camerajunkie
07-24-2008, 10:14 PM
I used to be in your neighborhood, Rich. Now I'm in Tennessee.

How's Maryland? I still miss it. Though we have a Rita's coming in within easy driving distance of my house now. That will help. :D

rawpaw18
07-25-2008, 04:16 AM
Rita's, thats funny. I'll ship you down something. I am the only one in the family
never to even try anything from there, guess I will have to see what all the fuss is about. Maryland, well its way overtaxed and poorly run but its home.

tekriter
07-25-2008, 08:36 AM
I've already cleared with the bride that I will be up close. She said as long as I'm not in her face or blocking the view of the guests, that should be fine. I'll scout it out better the night before the ceremony. Unfortunately they are getting married in St. Louis and we don't live there, so I can't see the venue til I get there.

The GOOD news is that it's outdoors. I'm hoping, hoping, hoping that there is enough light to not have to use the flash during the ceremony. I'd hate to do that. Otherwise my only other option is the 55-200mm. Do you think that's a better option? Because I can't really afford to buy another lens at this point. Unless someone wants to sell me their 70-200 f/2.8 or 85 mm f/1.8 dirt cheap. ;)


CJ -

I'm in St. Louis, I have an 80-200 f2.8 (non-AIS and not VR) that you can use. I also have an 85mm 1.8, a spare D50 body, a D300 body, two SB-800s, a 50 1.8, tripods, monopods, lightstands, and other assorted stuff. If you know the location, I might be able to check it out for you.

Send a private message and I'll see what I can do to help.

truflip
07-25-2008, 09:30 AM
^^ are u in ottawa? :D

Camerajunkie
07-26-2008, 11:41 AM
CJ -

I'm in St. Louis, I have an 80-200 f2.8 (non-AIS and not VR) that you can use. I also have an 85mm 1.8, a spare D50 body, a D300 body, two SB-800s, a 50 1.8, tripods, monopods, lightstands, and other assorted stuff. If you know the location, I might be able to check it out for you.

Send a private message and I'll see what I can do to help.


OMG. I'm PMing you, lol.

rawpaw18
07-26-2008, 03:10 PM
There is a site called www.lensrentals.com I was thinking of using them myself.

StuartN
07-26-2008, 04:01 PM
There is a site called www.lensrentals.com (http://www.lensrentals.com) I was thinking of using them myself.


I've used them before and they are quite good, both pricewise and shipping the lens to you on time. The price even includes return FedEx shipping.

They're in Memphis, TN so if you're close, you could even stop and pick it up.

truflip
07-26-2008, 08:54 PM
lol u guys totally just thread-jacked me :(:(. no offence, good info-- for americans.:p
i found http://lenslenders.ca/ for any canucks who might run into this thread in the future..
however if you have a henry's/headshots or vistek near your town/city.. go to them as their rates are cheaper.

rawpaw18
07-26-2008, 09:29 PM
Sorry my friend, sometimes they just kind of wander off in another direction.

I do not shoot weddings, fwiw.

truflip
07-26-2008, 10:52 PM
hehe no biggie. more the merrier :D

Camerajunkie
07-27-2008, 04:01 PM
Truflip.

I spend a lot of time looking up wedding photography and seeing what cameras and lenses people shoot with. For some reason photographers really like to brag about their equipment, lol. ;)

e_dawg
07-30-2008, 12:04 PM
I'm not a wedding photographer per se, but I do take pics at weddings for friends and family as a backup to the backup photographer ;)

I use the S5 Pro + 18-200/VR + SB-800. The wide range of focal lengths is very useful to me, although the DOF control and quality of the bokeh is not that great. Ideally, I would bring a second body to use for portraits or group shots, but I'm not doing this in any official capacity, so it's not that necessary.

I've found that the equipment is not as important as positioning, timing, and luck. The last two weddings I shot were very different wrt results. The first wedding I had a couple dozen great shots and some real keepers. The second wedding I really struggled to come away with a handful of good shots and few keepers.

The main difference was how the events unfolded... the type of events, the physical layout of the church and reception hall, where the subjects were, how far apart they were, where I could stand in relation to them, etc. The reception for the first wedding had most of the action in one area close to the head table, almost like a stage. The reception for the first wedding had the action taking place all over the reception hall, with lots of table to table movement making it very difficult to get a good position because of all the people crowding around whatever table the activity was at. Nothing was really conducive to getting a decent composition and the subject's expressions were not good when I could get the framing and composition.

truflip
07-30-2008, 10:20 PM
Yea I'm planning on borrowing a friends D80 body and mount a 70-200 f/2.8 (renting) and my Tamron 17-50 f/2.8.. then my D80 with a 50mm 1.8 and an 85mm 1.4 (renting) .. I dont generally like to use flash but I'll probably have an SB800 just incase. I don't plan on doing any strobist stuff either since weddings seem way too fast paced to try and set that stuff up properly. Probably in the after party I can play with that though.