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camerabug
04-13-2008, 10:46 AM
I have a Canon Powershot S2 IS. The camera manual recommends use of NiMH rechargeable batteries which I have been using. Recently I found my self in an emergency situation where my batteries went down and I bought Energizer AA lithium batteries. The camera seemed to operate normally. My question is, does it matter which battery type is used as long as they are AA, (1.2 lithium vs 1.5 V NiMH ratings)?

griptape
04-13-2008, 11:39 AM
No, it doesn't make any difference as long as they're AA's. Alkalines won't do you a whole lot of good (extremely short life), but you can use any AA.

rx_morph
04-13-2008, 11:40 AM
I have a Canon Powershot S2 IS. The camera manual recommends use of NiMH rechargeable batteries which I have been using. Recently I found my self in an emergency situation where my batteries went down and I bought Energizer AA lithium batteries. The camera seemed to operate normally. My question is, does it matter which battery type is used as long as they are AA, (1.2 lithium vs 1.5 V NiMH ratings)?

I don't think it matters really. However I believe some/most cameras have a setting where you can select which battery type is being used between the two (Alkaline / Ni-MH) so it can adjust itself for optimal performance. Hope that helps.

Visual Reality
04-13-2008, 11:56 AM
The "Lithium" batteries you used were non-rechargeable. Those are the best non-rechargeable AA's you can buy and using them is fine.

However the best route to go is to get yourself some Eneloops.

ColColt
04-13-2008, 12:34 PM
For recharging purposes, would the La Crosse BC-900 be better/quicker than Sanyo's recharger? I've read it takes seven hours to recharge the Eneloops in Sanyo's system as opposed to the La Crosse.

Visual Reality
04-13-2008, 12:39 PM
There's a reason for that - it's better for them.

ColColt
04-13-2008, 12:57 PM
That still seems like an excessive amount of time. Four hours should be sufficient to recharge any battery. The LaCrosse listed on Amazon even gives you four AA's and AAA's along with some C and D batteries. With four of the Eneloop's, that totals $52.89. Seems like a decent charger and versatile plus, you get four Eneloops and four LaCross batteries.

griptape
04-13-2008, 03:12 PM
I personally use a 1 hour charger (none of my cameras take AA's anymore, but in the past I've used them and still use them for my xbox controller and other stuff around the house) and batteries, and it's true that the heat is bad for the batteries and they don't last as long, but we're not talking night and day difference. I'd just rather have my batteries ready in an hour and have to replace them once a year than wait 7 hours and only have to replace them every 2 or 3 years.

Having said that, Enloops are reportedly the best battery/charger set currently going. But if you're like me, quicker chargers are a compromise you might be very willing to make.

Visual Reality
04-13-2008, 08:33 PM
The batteries fill to a higher capacity when charged slower. 1 hour is just way too fast, and you will never get the full mAh out of them.

What's so urgent that they have to be done in 1 hour? I plug mine in when I go to bed, and they are full when I wake up. If you have multiple sets you won't ever run into a time where you will say "crap! I have to charge these now!".

I'd rather not risk them bursting or catching fire because I'm so impatient I can't charge them overnight.

cdifoto
04-20-2008, 06:04 PM
What's so urgent that they have to be done in 1 hour?

Try having 12 sets. ;)

canon_A620
04-26-2008, 10:52 AM
The batteries fill to a higher capacity when charged slower. 1 hour is just way too fast, and you will never get the full mAh out of them.

What's so urgent that they have to be done in 1 hour? I plug mine in when I go to bed, and they are full when I wake up. If you have multiple sets you won't ever run into a time where you will say "crap! I have to charge these now!".

I'd rather not risk them bursting or catching fire because I'm so impatient I can't charge them overnight.

Charging at 1C is not "Way too fast" and will not damage cells, burst them, or set them on fire. Charging too slow can lead to increased crystalline formations within the cells, higher resistance, and lower capacity, not to mention missing charge termination.

I charge my cells between .5 and 1C and have achieved excellent capacities.

Most NiMH manufacturers recommend a charge rate between .5 and 1C, 1C being a 1 hour charge.

Visual Reality
04-26-2008, 03:47 PM
Charging at 1C is not "Way too fast" and will not damage cells, burst them, or set them on fire. Charging too slow can lead to increased crystalline formations within the cells, higher resistance, and lower capacity, not to mention missing charge termination.

I charge my cells between .5 and 1C and have achieved excellent capacities.

Most NiMH manufacturers recommend a charge rate between .5 and 1C, 1C being a 1 hour charge.
But not Sanyo. They specifically state that their Eneloops should not be charged from near empty to full any faster than 2 hours, with at least 4 being recommended.

Their own charger is a 6-8hr charger.

I personally would never use any 1-2 hour charger, but that's me.

K1W1
04-27-2008, 10:23 PM
If you are serious about using rechargeable batteries get one of these (http://www.mahaenergy.com/store/viewItem.asp?idProduct=423) from Powerex.

canon_A620
05-04-2008, 07:13 PM
If you are serious about using rechargeable batteries get one of these (http://www.mahaenergy.com/store/viewItem.asp?idProduct=423) from Powerex. I agree, this is my primary charger and I've been very happy with it.

I'll continue to charge my NiMH cells (LSD and Non-LSD) at a rate between .5 and 1A. And regarding Sanyo's charging recommendations for the eneloop cells, I'd say that's up for debate. The MH-C9000 put 900 mAh into my eneloop AAA cells at a charge rate of .7A :) and they were barely warm to the touch.