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steve-s
12-18-2007, 12:57 AM
I normally set WB to Auto on my D70s, and then change as necessary in RAW. What is perceived as the best.Setting white balance in the camera or adjusting in RAW??

Merry Xmas everybody

XaiLo
12-18-2007, 01:07 AM
That really depends how well the camera does in auto and the current lighting conditions in the sanctuary that I shoot in every week for instance depending on where I'm standing daylight, incadescent, flash, or stage lighting anyone of those three could be my key light. Auto does not fair well in this enviornment. :(

toriaj
12-19-2007, 12:52 AM
Hmm, Xailo, here I thought that the lighting in your sanctuary would be EXACTLY the kind of situation where AUTO would be most useful. The light is changing all the time, so you don't have time to be manually adjusting it. AUTO measures it for each pic, and therefore comes up with a pretty decent white balance, with little effort on your part. Then you can do any needed adjusting on your RAW photo in post-processing.

Sounds like I had that all wrong?

So do you you just adjust it yourself when you have a second, and do the rest of the adjustments on the RAW photos in PP?

tcadwall
12-19-2007, 06:21 AM
We have been around a couple of times on this... The real thing is preference. Personally I shoot raw most of the time and just leave WB in auto. There is no loss. Even though it has been disputed I vehemently disagree that there is loss. The raw image is a file of what each photosite saw. WB in camera is a setting that is used to convert to jpg. If the conversion happens in camera (you are shooting jpg), then it will generate a jpg based on that white balance and correction later, is lossy. If you are capturing raw, then the setting is saved in the file, and the raw converter uses that setting for viewing and converting to jpg. The setting does not affect the values provided by the photosites until your raw converter uses it... Even then it doesn't change the actual values of the raw file's photosite data.

So, if you want to have less post processing, you can take the time to get WB right when you shoot. If you are fine with taking the time to make the adjustments in post, then put the camera in auto, and fix the WB if needed later.

XaiLo
12-19-2007, 01:33 PM
Toriaj, you and me both, but in auto too many of the images looked like they were in super sepia mode very warm. I happen to like the effect for the most part. A couple of my favorite images do not translate or have the same impact with the white balance corrected. I shoot raw + JPEG, while raw gives you more to work with... it's a two edge sword it takes a little bit more effort to get the color I want out of it. It's like working with panatone color and that's a pain, there's so much variety it's hard to pin down the color you want (need), maybe it has something to do with photoshop. Anyway my results have been much better without using auto WB I tend to go with what works there's something to that path of least resistance thing at times.

tcadwall
12-19-2007, 04:48 PM
We are all talking about different models... I am not certain whether there are differences in WB accuracy between models... There very well could be since I think the D40, D50, and D70s all have different metering I believe. Even though I think they are all based on the same ccd. So experiences could really vary.

SpecialK
12-19-2007, 08:02 PM
We have been around a couple of times on this... The real thing is preference. Personally I shoot raw most of the time and just leave WB in auto. There is no loss. Even though it has been disputed I vehemently disagree that there is loss. The raw image is a file of what each photosite saw. WB in camera is a setting that is used to convert to jpg. If the conversion happens in camera (you are shooting jpg), then it will generate a jpg based on that white balance and correction later, is lossy. If you are capturing raw, then the setting is saved in the file, and the raw converter uses that setting for viewing and converting to jpg. The setting does not affect the values provided by the photosites until your raw converter uses it... Even then it doesn't change the actual values of the raw file's photosite data.

So, if you want to have less post processing, you can take the time to get WB right when you shoot. If you are fine with taking the time to make the adjustments in post, then put the camera in auto, and fix the WB if needed later.

Exactly. And, I guessing most people do "something" to the jpgs anyway, so doing it with RAW is not really any different. It's easy enought to just do a one-step batch process.