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urfslam
08-04-2007, 10:18 AM
Here is another of my Africa picts. Hope it is liked by all. Comments would be appreciated.

EXIF Data Below.

Urf

Nikon D80
2007/07/14 08:22:38
JPEG (8-bit) Fine
Image Size: 2212 x 1228
Color
Lens: 70-300mm F/4-5.6 D
Focal Length: 120mm
Exposure Mode: Programmed Auto
Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern
1/800 sec - F/7.1
Exposure Comp.: 0 EV
Sensitivity: ISO 250
Optimize Image: Normal
White Balance: Direct sunlight
AF Mode: AF-A

TNB
08-04-2007, 10:51 AM
Meoooooooooow! More cats. ;)

Rooz
08-04-2007, 04:52 PM
thats a brilliant shot. more please. no more drip feeds ! all in one go in one thread. :D

bobc4d
08-04-2007, 07:00 PM
an incredible picture of a majestic animal. great photo

urfslam
08-05-2007, 10:07 AM
thats a brilliant shot. more please. no more drip feeds ! all in one go in one thread. :D

I took 3000 photos, do you want to see them all?:) I've gotten the sense that people that post tons of photos at one time get flamed so I've been wary to do too many but I'll sift through them and cull it down to a couple hundred and post them.

Urf.

urfslam
08-05-2007, 10:40 AM
OK, due to popular demand here is a virtual flood of photos from Africa.

The first is two Cheetahs (there's a third off shot) warding off a Hyena. You can see one baring it's teeth and both have their hackles up. Typically the cheetah would be alone and run away but there were three of them and only one hyena.
The second is a mum elephant trying to decide if we are too close to her baby. Shortly after I took this photo our guide started to back the truck up, thought she was about to charge. Too bad she didn't, would have been a great picture.
The third is the remains of a Warthog. It was the dinner of the Leopard we saw later on in the evening. I'll post pictures of the leopard but they require a lot of pp because of the lighting.

Urf.:D

herc182
08-05-2007, 03:27 PM
lovely photos. one thing i have noticed (which is basically down to the nature of a safari) is the harsh lighting. I would either underexpose by a stop (which i am not sure whether you are doing already or not). Actually i downloaded the elephant one and it shows you were shooting at iso 200 which you shouldnt need to, and 0EV compensation (D80 tends to overexpose generally). Hence the image is a touch overexposed (in my opinion! Others might disagree).

Good composition, good photos, just a tad overexposed.

longroad
08-05-2007, 05:29 PM
Awesome photos!
Im sooo jealous. Its my dream to see big cats in the wild..... which safari company did you go with?

Rooz
08-05-2007, 05:48 PM
I took 3000 photos, do you want to see them all?:) I've gotten the sense that people that post tons of photos at one time get flamed so I've been wary to do too many but I'll sift through them and cull it down to a couple hundred and post them.

Urf.

have you got a flickr account ?
best bet is to upload a bunch of em there and send thru the link. :)

Pinoy2.0
08-06-2007, 02:09 AM
hey all...new here...

would having a lens hood have more contrast in the (elephant) photo...or underexposing the slightly over-exposed image? i just found out about those things yesterday :)

great photos though, my dream is to see an african safari. absolute dream.

Rooz
08-06-2007, 02:54 AM
welcome to the forums. start posting some pics ! :)

re: lens hood.
not really, a circular polariser would add more contrast. lens hoods try and minimise sunlight reflecting and boucning all over your lens which can cause lens flare, especially when the sun is coming at you from an angle.

the elephant photo is taken at f5.6 1/500s. so probably setting it at f8 or even f10, 1/250s would give you a little better sharpness and contrast. possibly setting it to -0.7EV to underexpsose a tad aswell. but really, under those conditions where the sun is very harsh and the landscape is very bright, and your taking a pic of a dark object, that shot, (and the cheetah one aswell), is actually metered and exposed vey well !

urfslam
08-06-2007, 10:57 AM
lovely photos. one thing i have noticed (which is basically down to the nature of a safari) is the harsh lighting. I would either underexpose by a stop (which i am not sure whether you are doing already or not). Actually i downloaded the elephant one and it shows you were shooting at iso 200 which you shouldnt need to, and 0EV compensation (D80 tends to overexpose generally). Hence the image is a touch overexposed (in my opinion! Others might disagree).

Good composition, good photos, just a tad overexposed.


I agree. I had the camera for about a month before the trip and was still getting familiarized with it. Basically a neophite. I think I've seen people comment that the Nikons tent to be on the overexposed side.

Thanks for the comments.

Urf.

urfslam
08-06-2007, 11:01 AM
[QUOTE=longroad;241878]Awesome photos!
Im sooo jealous. Its my dream to see big cats in the wild..... which safari company did you go with?[/QUOT

We did three safaris in total. We spent four days in Tanzania and went to Lake Manyara and the Ngorogoro Crater. There we stayed in the Serena Lodges and the safari company was Bushbuck Safaris. We also went to the Maasai Mara in Kenya with Heritage Intrepids Safari Company. We stayed in a tent lodge that were as nice as a 5 star hotel. Our tent looked out over a river about 20 feet away. At night the hippos would come to the water and snort around for a few hours.

If you're planning a trip I've got some contacts in Nairobi that can book everything for you. They are local Kenyans. Let me know.

Urf.

urfslam
08-06-2007, 11:03 AM
hey all...new here...

would having a lens hood have more contrast in the (elephant) photo...or underexposing the slightly over-exposed image? i just found out about those things yesterday :)

great photos though, my dream is to see an african safari. absolute dream.

I had a hood on for all of the photos. Mostly the problem is with my skill with the camera. Next time I'm in Africa on safari I'm sure I'll do better.:D

Urf

urfslam
08-06-2007, 11:05 AM
welcome to the forums. start posting some pics ! :)

re: lens hood.
not really, a circular polariser would add more contrast. lens hoods try and minimise sunlight reflecting and boucning all over your lens which can cause lens flare, especially when the sun is coming at you from an angle.

the elephant photo is taken at f5.6 1/500s. so probably setting it at f8 or even f10, 1/250s would give you a little better sharpness and contrast. possibly setting it to -0.7EV to underexpsose a tad aswell. but really, under those conditions where the sun is very harsh and the landscape is very bright, and your taking a pic of a dark object, that shot, (and the cheetah one aswell), is actually metered and exposed vey well !


Hey, thanks a lot for the encouragement. I appreciate it.

Urf.

Pinoy2.0
08-06-2007, 02:16 PM
so, i did some research, but don't know as much as y'all do.

polarizers are more for cities with all the reflecting light, and hoods...well...i thought hoods could be used all the time, even encouraged?

i'm just thinking, to some if that one photo was over-exposed, what would work better...a hood or a polarizer? how would you know when to use what?

herc182
08-06-2007, 02:32 PM
Pretty much have a polarisor on all the time in sunshine.

However, the thing with the safari is that the lighting is very harsh. Direct sunlight high in the sky. makes good for black and white converts but otherwise its very demanding light to shoot in. you need to know the limitations of your camera well. one limitation is that the D80 overexposes...

I would have the histogram on review screen and make sure its not bunched up to the right. alternatively shoot raw as that gives you more scope to adjust the levels in photoshop later (if need be).

jcon
08-06-2007, 03:22 PM
Urf, there is a guy over on the Panasonic side of this site that would LOVE to see these pictures... he loves his wildlife too! His name is Genece:)

Thank you for sharing!

Rooz
08-06-2007, 05:36 PM
polarizers are more for cities with all the reflecting light, and hoods...well...i thought hoods could be used all the time, even encouraged?

i'm just thinking, to some if that one photo was over-exposed, what would work better...a hood or a polarizer? how would you know when to use what?

yes, you are right, a polriser is great for reflections in cities cos they minimise sun glare. the way a circular polariser works is a bit technical but essentially, it is used for bright sunny days to minimise the glare from the sun which produces more contrast and a slightly darker image, (it reduces your light by a couple of stops aswell). it renders skies a deeper blue and provides more "saturation" to most other colours, especially greens and browns in a landscape.

i always use a lens hood outdoors or with flash photography but alot of times its really out of habit and not all that necessary. the hood prevents other forms of unwanted light from interfering the lens face, like sun glare etc