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mugsisme
08-01-2007, 01:41 PM
My reverse ring came, and it is right now. Any help someone can give me would be great, since there are no instructions with it. I put it on the lens, and put it on the camera. I got an error message that says lens is not attached. The view finder is black. How do I take a picture?

Ray Schnoor
08-01-2007, 01:48 PM
You are getting that message because the ring doesn't provide electrical contact between the lens and camera. You will have to use the camera in full manual mode to take photos. I don't however understand why the viewfinder is black. Do you have the lens cap on?

Ray.

mugsisme
08-01-2007, 02:27 PM
No, cuz the lens is facing the body.

Ray Schnoor
08-01-2007, 02:35 PM
What about the lens cap on the other end?

Ray.

mugsisme
08-01-2007, 02:50 PM
Nope, it was the cheap plastic one, and I took it off before I put it on.

OK, I figured out that part of it. I had the appeture ring locked at f/22, so it was so dark. I set the flash to manual. but I can't seem to get some good pictures. Wow, this is a lot harder than I thought it would be. I just wonder how people get good shots. I have to hold the camera, and it is so hard to hold it perfectly still. I still have to figure out the shutter speed, cuz the whole thing is manual. :-(

Any hints would be lovely.

toriaj
08-01-2007, 08:53 PM
Have you considered camera shake? Look at the focal length you're using and multiply the focal length by 1.5, for the crop factor of your camera sensor. You should not try to hand-hold a shutter speed longer than 1/that number. If you're at 18mm, you shouldn't try to handhold longer than 1/27 second. If you're using your longest focal length, 1/200, you shouldn't hand-hold a shutter speed longer than 1/300 sec.

Try to keep the aperture between f/8 and f/16 as much as you can, for best sharpness. And I'd recommend not using the on-camera flash ... better to shoot subjects in bright off-camera light.

aparmley
08-02-2007, 08:02 PM
Have you considered camera shake? Look at the focal length you're using and multiply the focal length by 1.5, for the crop factor of your camera sensor. You should not try to hand-hold a shutter speed longer than 1/that number. If you're at 18mm, you shouldn't try to handhold longer than 1/27 second. If you're using your longest focal length, 1/200, you shouldn't hand-hold a shutter speed longer than 1/300 sec.

Try to keep the aperture between f/8 and f/16 as much as you can, for best sharpness. And I'd recommend not using the on-camera flash ... better to shoot subjects in bright off-camera light.

:rolleyes::confused: ???

I don't think you're rule applies to this situation Toriaj? The reason why holding the camera still becomes a big issue in this case would have to be the reverse magnification factor - Imagine holding a slide with your fingers under a microscope; the slightest bit of movement is mangnified - similar to shooting at extreme focal lenghts 600mm +.

toriaj
08-02-2007, 11:52 PM
aparmley, sounds like you're way ahead of me on this ... I don't really know, it was the first thing I thought of :)

mugsisme, it might help if you posted a pic. Good luck :)

K1W1
08-03-2007, 12:27 AM
I think a tripod and/or a couple of heavy bean bags plus a wireless remote should probably be your next purchases if you want to persist with the reversed lens.

Viky
08-03-2007, 05:21 AM
I've just got myself two reverse coupling rings that allow you to mount an inverted lens on the front of a regular lens.

I'm currently experimenting with the 50mm f/1.8 reverse mounted on my 70-300IS, and am facing a similar problem of camera shake...

From my diagnosis, the reason seems to be that with this setup, the 'focus distance' is so drastically reduced that the front lens element is effectively covering your subject and blocking most of the light, which results is slower shutter speeds leading to camera shake.

I need to try more during the day in bright sunlight:rolleyes:

On the plus side, it gives you amazing magnification....

aparmley
08-03-2007, 06:47 AM
aparmley, sounds like you're way ahead of me on this ... I don't really know, it was the first thing I thought of :)

mugsisme, it might help if you posted a pic. Good luck :)

I'm no expert and you were thinking along the same lines, its just not related to the 1/focal lenght rule that normally applies so you were infact slightly ahead of me on that one. ;)