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View Full Version : More Architecture shots... I think I did better this time.



VTEC_EATER
07-09-2007, 08:02 PM
Hey everyone,

Some may know that I am an architect (little "a" not big "A" as Im not licensed yet), and if you had read my previous post about Architecture photos, you may know that I am taking photographs for my company's (soon to be revamped) website.

Well, I posted up some photos in this (http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=32371) thread where I got some very nice C&C. In addition, I received similar C&C over at Nikonians, and I am hoping I have made improvements with this latest round of photos.

A brief overview: This was an impromptu photo session. I did not have a tripod, and I had to go out and purchase an SB-800 on my way to the home. The weather was a balmy 90 degrees, and my car does not have air conditioning. Needless to say, I was a bit frazzled when I got there, but I think I managed okay and got some photos that have improved over the last batch.

As before, these were all shot in RAW and the have now been adjusted in Bibble (thanks tcadwall for the recommendation) as opposed to Adobe Camera Raw 3.5. Bibble is a million times better, and allowed me to do EVERY correction I needed to before I turned the image into a .jpeg. Its a wonderful program so far.

These are a few I have corrected, I still have about 15 more to go, but its almost 9 PM and Ive been at work for the past 13 hours. Its time to go home, and read up on this SB-800.

I hope these arent too boring for everyone, so please take a look and let me know what I may be able to improve on. On with the show:

Nikon D50 w/ Sigma 18-50 F/2.8 Macro @ 26mm, F/11, 1/8 sec, ISO 200
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1251/765519206_2a6ca15ce0_o.jpg

Nikon D50 w/ Nikkor 12-24 F/4 @ 12mm, F/9, 1/10 sec, ISO 400, w/ SB-800 flash
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1251/765519224_c977e7fbe9_o.jpg

Nikon D50 w/ Nikkor 12-24 F/4 @ 12mm, F/8, 1/6 sec, ISO 400, w/ SB-800 flash
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1260/765519264_e5d8300d91_o.jpg

Nikon D50 w/ Nikkor 12-24 F/4 @ 12mm, F/8, 1/15 sec, ISO 400, w/ SB-800 flash (yes, I know a light is burnt out, I will have to try and fix that in Photoshop)
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1336/765519286_b10ac5b6b0_o.jpg


Nikon D50 w/ Nikkor 12-24 F/4 @ 12mm, F/9, 1/25 sec, ISO 400, w/ SB-800 flash
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1084/765519302_931ac7ea7d_o.jpg

K1W1
07-09-2007, 09:26 PM
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1251/765519206_2a6ca15ce0_o.jpg


I'm not sure I like the dead leaves in front of the deck in this shot. A little snip with some secateurs would have framed the house better.

Rooz
07-09-2007, 10:05 PM
i agree. first thing i noticed about that photo was the branch hanging down, dead or not, it doesn;t need to be there.

i'm not architect by any means but the lighting and overall coposition and ambience of the interior shots are great and they wouldn;t look out of place in any of my wife's "help me spend more money by looking at this picture" magazines.

i would point out though that if you are going top end and do this as a living you need to have an impeccable attention to detail. little things like on one of the kitchen bench shots there is an empty milkshake cup and another canaster with it looks like scissors inside?? there is also too much of the black electrical cord showing on the toaster in the other kitchen bench shot. they all have to go. i know that sounds petty but like i said, if you are gonna do this pro with what looks to be a beautiful high end home, there will be a certain expectaion of elegance and "perfection".

K1W1
07-10-2007, 12:55 AM
If we are getting picky we could talk about the way the towels are folded above the cistern as well. :):)
I agree that I like the ambiance and framing of the shots though.

VTEC_EATER
07-10-2007, 07:23 AM
Yep, the branch was pissing me off when I got back to the office. I thought I would give it a shot though, and I think I agree with you guys. It is annoying. I don't mind the green leaves still on the branch, I think they fill that dead space of overexposed sky, but the dead guy has to go. I focused too much on blocking the A/C condenser units with that big tree on the right that I didn't pay attention to how that dead leaf would look in the photo. And if we are really getting picky, I should have taken out that sign in front of the tree as well.

The mug was a complete oversight. I had that kitchen pretty cleaned up, but the homeowner must have put it there when I was upstairs. Its okay though. It should be a simple photoshop adjustment and it will be gone. Same for the scissors, and the toaster cord.

The tough one will be replacing that burnt out light above the vanity. Im not that skilled in photoshop and it will probably take a bit of time to get that to look somewhat right.

As for the towels, I knew I should have refolded all of them. I quickly adjusted them so they werent falling through the holder, or spilling all over the place, but I really should have refolded all of them.

I dont plan on doing this professionally. Im an architect (little "a"), and that is my career. This photography thing I do for a hobby. However, this attention to detail should be something I do without thinking. I mean, the level of detail we go into in our drawings is crazy, so I would think I would be more astute to detail. Oh well, just one more thing for me to check before I push the shutter release.

Thanks for the help guys.

aparmley
07-11-2007, 07:24 AM
These seem to be more home decor shots rather than architecture, but last time I checked, I wasn't an architect so what do I know really. Overall I think you did an excellent job. Very nice kitchen - I bet the kitchen upgrade cost more than my entire house and car combined! :D


. I mean, the level of detail we go into in our drawings is crazy, so I would think I would be more astute to detail. Oh well, just one more thing for me to check before I push the shutter release.


As I recall from my mechanical drawing classes, CAD class, and my architectural drawing class in highschool, its a very different thing to be responsible for adding all the detail yourself one step at a time rather than say noticing a small detail thats already present in any given scene. You know, just as well as I, what they say about hindsight. . . ;)

VTEC_EATER
07-11-2007, 06:19 PM
These seem to be more home decor shots rather than architecture, but last time I checked, I wasn't an architect so what do I know really.

Well, they arent totally home decor, but I can easily see what you are referring to. The idea, I guess, would be to show the spaces (ie. details like coffered ceilings, stone and tile layouts/patterns, cabinetry, doorways/archways, etc.) and how they work (ie. furniture placement, ambiance, spacial restrictions, adjacencies, etc.). That is of course just for interior shots, but exterior is more about the Architecture of the home. Unfortunately, I haven't really shown you guys too many shots of the exteriors because so far, I haven't been out on too many large additions to take shots. I have included a couple exterior shots, one of which is in the post I liked to above, and another is here, which I know I have to go back and re-shoot to get rid of the branch and sign. But thats pretty easy.


Overall I think you did an excellent job. Very nice kitchen - I bet the kitchen upgrade cost more than my entire house and car combined! :D

Lets see, the kitchen cabinets in that home were probably close to $35,000 ( I would have to look in our files), then you add approximately $17,000 for appliances, another $6000-8000 for granite counter tops, another $1500-2000 for the sink and faucet, etc... You are looking at around $60,000 or so. I don't have the exact numbers, but it does get rather pricey when it all is added up. As a side note, we are the designers/suppliers of the cabinetry as well. We design probably 90% of the cabinetry in the homes we design. As an off shoot of the company we are beginning a custom cabinetry business that sort of makes a one stop shop so to speak. Thats why I take so many pictures of vanities, and kitchens. In case anyone was wondering.


As I recall from my mechanical drawing classes, CAD class, and my architectural drawing class in highschool, its a very different thing to be responsible for adding all the detail yourself one step at a time rather than say noticing a small detail thats already present in any given scene. You know, just as well as I, what they say about hindsight. . . ;)

No doubt. I took some more photos today at another clients home and I stripped that place bare. They look like minimalists in the photographs. In hindsight, I would have added some place settings at the kitchen table to spruce up the photo a bit, but I became so focused on removing all the kids drawings on the walls, the miscellaneous papers lying around, the paper towel roll, tooth brushes, shoes, etc... You know, all the stuff everyone uses on a daily basis and accept unknowingly in real life, but look really bad in a photograph.

Here are a few from that photo shoot (Same editing as above: RAW, Bibble, Photoshop, Jpeg):

D50 w/ Nikkor 12-24 F/4 @ 12mm, .769ss, F/11, ISO 200, SB-800
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1306/781101656_49659be211_o.jpg

D50 w/ Nikkor 12-24 F/4 @ 12mm, .769ss, F/11, ISO 200, SB-800
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1029/781101792_adb4e2b5ce_o.jpg

D50 w/ Nikkor 12-24 F/4 @ 14mm, 1/2ss, F/11, ISO 200, SB-800
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1226/781101806_5fcdb62a8d_o.jpg

D50 w/ Nikkor 12-24 F/4 @ 24mm, 1/40ss, F/11, ISO 200 (circular polarizer)
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1326/781101760_89021f5870_o.jpg

The one thing Im pissed about is that I dropped the 12-24 on the driveway from about 12 inches. Minor nick on the lens hood, and pushed the lens cap into my polarizer and cracked it. So theres $140 down the drain. But the lens itself is perfectly fine. I guess thats the last time I ever try to stuff a lens in my pocket. Time to bring out the whole camera bag and store those pricey lenses in their little padded pockets.

wh0128
07-11-2007, 07:15 PM
Excellent photos of the houses you shot at. I really like the lights in the bedroom. Kinda different.

As for that one photo with the burnt out light you could easily clone one of the other lights and put it where the burnt out light is without any trouble of being able to notice you had done so.

And just to be annoying, and to get really picky:), you could have mowed the lawn and blow off the porch in the first picture with the dead leaf in the frame.

This kinda makes me wanna take some architectural photos of my own.

VTEC_EATER
07-11-2007, 07:41 PM
Excellent photos of the houses you shot at. I really like the lights in the bedroom. Kinda different.

Yeah that was something a little different, especially for a bedroom. Thats something we would typically do for a media room, or perhaps a dining room for a little more ambiance, but it was just one of those funky details that makes a rather bland room a little more special.


And just to be annoying, and to get really picky:), you could have mowed the lawn and blow off the porch in the first picture with the dead leaf in the frame.

Well, it may have been awkward to have asked the client to mow her lawn before I come out to shoot. I have a hard enough time trying to get them to clean up before I come over.

K1W1
07-12-2007, 04:03 AM
The drink container has gone! :)

tcadwall
07-12-2007, 06:25 AM
Tough balance between stark and empty vs cluttered. Think you are doing a good job with that. One of the outdoor shots (from memory, I can't see the photos through the firewall here) had a porch roof (or other horizontal line) that seemed to bow. The lower (parallel) line did not bow. IOW some barrel distortion that could be fixed? Forgive me if I am wrong since I can't look at it to confirm.

Friend has a countertop business, and I initially setup his (very basic and boring) website. But I nagged and nagged for him to take before and after pictures. But according to him, the before pictures normally would have too much clutter, and the after pictures would be TOO stark and barren. So I only was given a few "After" pictures... That DID have a few appliances in them.

aparmley
07-12-2007, 08:03 AM
Wow. . . I can't get over that kitchen. Beautiful interiors. . . As for the price tag on that kitchen, ya, I was right, more than my home and car combined. :o

VTEC_EATER
07-12-2007, 08:11 AM
If you were to look at the "before" pictures, you would laugh. Not necessarily at the current homes look, but the photos themselves are horrible. Pictures where half the house is blocked by a huge tree, or power line. Here, Ill post one for you guys below. In other words, the before pictures are very unattractive. This photo below is a before shot of the home in the second set of shots I have posted in this thread.

Rooz
07-12-2007, 08:33 AM
Wow. . . I can't get over that kitchen. Beautiful interiors. . . As for the price tag on that kitchen, ya, I was right, more than my home and car combined. :o

if it makes you feel any better, the only way they could have made the oven more inconveniently placed would be if they put it by near the mailbox. :)

great set of pics btw vtech.

VTEC_EATER
07-12-2007, 09:40 AM
Wow. . . I can't get over that kitchen. Beautiful interiors. . . As for the price tag on that kitchen, ya, I was right, more than my home and car combined. :o

It is a bit crazy where I work. Our typical small addition/remodel is in the $350,000 - $500,000 range. Larger addition/remodels are in the $750,000-$1,000,000 range, and new homes can be anywhere from $1,000,000 and up. That is typically just the "construction" cost of the project. That doesn't include architectural fees, permit fees, cabinetry, appliances, interior painting, landscaping, furnishing, etc... The amount of money our clients have to spend is rather mind blowing. What is strange is that after 2 years of working here, I have become sort of numb to it. A half million dollar project is just an every day thing now.

Crazy.