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dxrocnxj
07-04-2007, 05:11 AM
happy july 4th everyone!
so i couldnt sleep this past night and i went to sunrise.
excited a si was about the pictures i was taking it was really hit and miss.
on this picture i feel like i just didnt get the shot right and im looking for some critique on it because most of the shots came out the same.
maybe i didnt focus correctly?
i really dont know and thats why im asking. :)

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1074/715100398_77dca01a32.jpg

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1136/714216803_7f613c9c53.jpg

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1262/714216787_9950295464.jpg

Rooz
07-04-2007, 05:13 AM
you need to post your exif data.

dxrocnxj
07-04-2007, 05:30 AM
1.
Focal Length: 18mm
Exposure Mode: Aperture Priority
Metering Mode: Spot
1/4000 sec - F/5

2.
Focal Length: 18mm
Digital Vari-Program: Auto (Flash Off)
Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern
1/125 sec - F/5.6

3.
Focal Length: 18mm
Digital Vari-Program: Close Up
Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern
1/60 sec - F/5.6


my girlfriend was taking pictures at one point because i had to move my car since i was getting written a ticket for where i was parked, and she might have played with the knob and i didnt check it on the way back to shooting:confused:

but either way, explain even though i see some of the problem already haha.

Rooz
07-04-2007, 05:39 AM
funnily enuf i really like #3 despite the error in the setting lol

anyway, for a landscape shot like that you need a smaller aperture to get more of the frame in focus. something like f11 and up.

dxrocnxj
07-04-2007, 05:46 AM
haha thanks a lot, might have to get rid of the woman for this.
:p

tcadwall
07-04-2007, 06:48 AM
Not a sunrise pro... I am not normally up by then. But, I agree somewhere around f10 or f11 depending on lens. Then also I shoot a sunrise (or more likely sunset) in RAW everytime. THere are SO many stops of light at this time of day, and the colors are brilliant. THIS means that 8-bit jpg is NOT going to touch what you are seeing without some help from you. You need to ensure that the right colors get the saturation needed, that darker foregrounds are brightened, while the sky gets some deeper color.

I think that is what you are feeling... Like the real scene was just sooo much more than the shot shows. - because it was. If you shot it raw, it isn't too late unless the sky highlights are blown, but your histogram would have told you that when you shot the picture. Another rule I use... ALWAYS use the Histogram.

Rooz
07-04-2007, 06:58 AM
thats a very good point tc. hopefully denis sees this thread and give his HDR advice aswell.

LR Max
07-04-2007, 07:24 AM
I like to take sunset photos as well, but I've only done it a few times. I did a lot of research on the subject and here is what I can tell you:

Its all about timing, clouds, and viewpoint. When you go to take a sunset photo, be out there about 10 minutes before sunset. Look up the exact sunset time on weather.com or somewhere. 10 minutes is the bare minimum. Sometimes it takes longer because of setup (need to change location, fiddle with camera, etc). Roughly three minutes before, during, and 3 minutes after sunset, take A LOT of photos. Its really a hit or miss kinda deal. Either the light lines up perfectly for that one instant, or it don't. But since you've got a digital camera, running the shutter isn't going to waste a lot of film so go for it. You'll have one picture out of 50 that'll be any good. But thats what it takes. Sometimes the photo taken at the exact sunset time is good, sometimes a hair after sunset time. Its a game of chance and it can be a pain sometimes.

I also use a tripod. Dunno why, I just do. For my camera settings, I use AWB, lowest ISO (200 for my D70s), I select the sharpest apeture for my lense (for my 18-200VR, I used f/8 up from 18-100 and f/13 from 100-200). That setup seems to work, so I don't mess with it. Sometimes you'll need to overexpose, sometimes not. Once again, its one of those things you just gotta play with to get right.

Here are a few examples that I've taken. Each one with a Nikon D70s with the 18-200VR lense. Everything mounted on a tripod.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/223/508603680_f0fa8c74aa.jpg
Exposure: 0.167 sec (1/6)
Aperture: f/13
Focal Length: 120 mm
Exposure Bias: 0/6 EV

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/150/421723497_a854dcc8d5.jpg
Camera: Nikon D70s
Exposure: 0.01 sec (1/100)
Aperture: f/8
Focal Length: 105 mm
Exposure Bias: 0/6 EV
ISO Speed: 200

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/177/420742067_6e3e5b0a1c.jpg
Exposure: 0.017 sec (1/60)
Aperture: f/8
Focal Length: 29 mm
Exposure Bias: 2/3 EV
ISO Speed: 200

wh0128
07-04-2007, 12:32 PM
Those photos don't look too bad. All you'd need to do is change the aperture and they'd be much better.

dxrocnxj
07-04-2007, 01:03 PM
thanks a lot for the input, i appreciate it all and i will be taking all this with me when i get the chance to do it again.

LR Max
07-04-2007, 06:39 PM
Those photos don't look too bad. All you'd need to do is change the aperture and they'd be much better.

Really? I'd like to hear more on this out of curiosity.

dxrocnxj
07-04-2007, 08:51 PM
Really? I'd like to hear more on this out of curiosity.


i think he was talking about my photos, but i could be wrong.
:confused:

XaiLo
07-04-2007, 10:20 PM
dxrocnxj, allow me to suggest picking up "Understanding Exposure" Revised Edition by Bryan Peterson an easy read with plenty of practical examples. It's a great book and for under $20 it a bargin. It will allow you to create the pics you want. and the pics are cool :)

dxrocnxj
07-04-2007, 10:43 PM
you know i think thatd be perfect and i appreciate the reference xailo.
i mean i know what all the camera terminology means, but i just dont get how it works just yet.

XaiLo
07-04-2007, 11:15 PM
you know i think thatd be perfect and i appreciate the reference xailo.
i mean i know what all the camera terminology means, but i just dont get how it works just yet.

No problem, you'll enjoy the book, have fun and happy shooting ;)