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View Full Version : And for my next silly question....



pjd
05-27-2007, 05:09 PM
..... if I get the Pentax K100D with two lenses for under 400, and just leave it on AUTO for the vast majority of the time, will I get better results than a top end p & s/ prosumer? (Obviously there is more to be had from utilising all the functions available but I'm still learning.)

My Fuji F30 is great indoors and fine outdoors, but I want a little bit more. I figure that I don't really need a DSLR and the associated expense and bother with swapping lenses. But the likes of the Canon S3/5 and Sony H5/7 have, I believe, only a slight improvement in sensor quality and really only have zoom as their main advantage over the F30. The other thing I'm looking for is wide-angle, and the likes of the above don't even have that. I'd be prepared to go for the Pentax at the above price if I've got this right, otherwise I don't know what will tick enough boxes for me.

Help?

tim11
05-27-2007, 05:22 PM
DSLR have advantages over PnS hands down if you are willing to explore them. But since you will leave it in auto anyway then most of those advantages will be lost.
I see you are happy with F30. Are you aware of Fuji FinePix S6000fd (aka S6500fd)? It's F30 with longer zoom, 28 mm wide angle, manual zoom and focus rings. Excelleng face detection technology and solidly built with 10.7 optical zoom. It has no IS though but neither do most DSLR. It's menu structures are very similar to F30 and it the characteristic of F30 since they the same image sensor. I suggest you have a look.

SpecialK
05-27-2007, 06:12 PM
I would recommend shooting in P(rogram) over Auto as Auto uses the "Bright" mode which can cause some colors to glow excessively. If you shoot in RAW then you can change it to "natural" but I doubt you would use that format if you plan to shoot in Auto.

fionndruinne
05-27-2007, 06:19 PM
P mode is not that hard, when you just keep an eye on a few settings, such as ISO and exposure value. Not any much harder than using it on auto.

pjd
05-29-2007, 02:12 PM
Am certainly aware of the S6500fd- in fact, I went for a "hands-on" test today with it and a Pentax, Olympus E500 and the D40 (might be interested in the D50, but they didn't have one). They all felt very similar to me, certainly not any great difference in any of them that would either rule one in or out. I found myself wondering again, though, am I being too ambitious and questioning my need for a DSLR-especially considering the price of the Fuji! My main concern about it is the difference it offers over the F30, particularly in respect of IQ- is there any (same sensor)?
In terms of IQ, I know a DSLR would have an advantage. Wider angle is a big plus over the F30 but 18mm in a DSLR vs 28mm in a s-zoom is fairly significant I would have thought. The 10.7 zoom is very appealing but I can't really detect any other major differences.

Ultimately I want to be able to print selected holiday (scenery) and portrait shots for display in our home- so the image quality has to be as top notch as possible. Will the Fuji "cut it" or should I bite the bullet and go DSLR?

Rooz
05-29-2007, 02:33 PM
..... if I get the Pentax K100D and just leave it on AUTO for the vast majority of the time, will I get better results than a top end p & s/ prosumer?

in short, no you will not. dslr's will ultimately provide much better IQ but you need to put some work into it. i would also be concerned that if you are going full auto all the time AND getting the shitty pentax kit lens then you will end up being very disappointed. it is much easier to get quality shots in auto from a p/s in auto than from a dslr.

shahmatt
05-29-2007, 07:28 PM
Between the S6500Fd and the F30.

IQ: Noise reduction for the S6500 is a tad more aggressive that the F30, but the S6500 has RAW capability, which will give you a chance to make your own adjustments for a shot that you feel is critical.

The flash is more powerful than the F30. And it has a full manual mode, unlike the F30 which only goes as far as shutter/aperture priority modes.

Price and convenience ought to feature in your choice. A DSLR will definitely give you a better quality image, but with the lenses you will inevitably collect, you might end up lugging around some weight and probably will end up paying more. The Fuji gives a 'limited' deal for a reasonable cost. Amongst the prosumers, I would say it give the best overall image quality with pretty decent features.