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View Full Version : More d40 vs. XT, My situation:



Knittingfor4
05-26-2007, 08:14 PM
I know NOTHING about photography. I just need speed. I keep missing expressions and actions with my Kodak P712. I'm leaning towards the XT. I shoot in Auto mode, mostly indoors, always action shots although I will take some close ups and stuff (see siggy ;)). I just want speed, and good quality pics. I won't be blowing up any of my own pics past 8x10. I'm going to get an instructional DVD for whichever camera I get, but honestly I'm not too into real photograghy. I've held both and though the d40 feels better, I think I want the XT instead. It's faster and has more megapixels in case I need to crop and zoom. I definately want something better than the kit lens. I'm using a 12x zoom and I used it to it's fullest at Kindergarten graduation. If I don't even know what spot meter, ISO and stuff are, do I care about their specs? Is refurbished bad? I'm sorry I'm just confused LOL. Thanks for your help :o

RichNY
05-27-2007, 07:02 AM
People interpret 'speed' in many different ways and based on your use I don't think you are looking at it in the traditional photography way. For example, cameras that take 8-10 pictures per second (speed) cost between $2000-$4500 plus lenses that will run another few grand.

I am guessing that your issue is what we call shutter lag- the time delay between when you press the shutter button and when the camera actually takes a picture, is that correct?

When you move into DSLR cameras like the D40 or XT we stop using the word zoom and start using the measurements of the focal length of the lens. For example a lens may go from 18mm-72mm, or it may go from 24mm-96mm. In the marketing world both of these would be called 4x zoom because the long end of the lens is 4x the short end yet 4x isn't really telling us how wide or close up a picture we can take.

With your existing Kodak 712 the 12x takes the equivalent pictures to a 35mm camera of 36mm-412mm. I'll skip the technical part but when buying lenses for a DSLR such as the D40/XT you need to divide these numbers by 1.5 or 1.6 to get to the 35mm camera equivalent so just accept that to take pictures as wide or as close up as your Kodak 712 you will need a lens that goes from about 24mm-275mm.

Can you post one or two pictures you took that represent what doesn't work with your existing camera and it will give us a better idea how to help you. Also an idea of what your budget is.

Knittingfor4
05-27-2007, 07:19 AM
Sure I can post one as soon as I get them on the computer :o Yes, shutter lag is a major problem, but so is shot to shot time. I'm constantly missing fleeting moments because of the shutter lag AND the recycle time of the whole camera itself. In the store I pointed the cameras at the baby and just kept clicking the button and they just kept taking pictures. That's what I want. I just want to make sure that I get the right one for the lighting and subjects I'm going to have 99% of the time. I've heard Canon's cmos thing is really great. I just want to make sure it'll perform well indoors with action.

Visual Reality
05-27-2007, 08:00 AM
Are you using continuous shooting mode? My Canon S3 (very similar to the P712 and Sony H5) can do 2-2.5 shots per second in daylight on high speed continuous.

This mode gets rid of the "preview" after each shot and just keeps going as long as you hold down the button.

When I think of an SLR camera in terms of "speed", I would want it for its ability to stop a picture dead in its tracks with no motion blur, with high quality due to its large sensor.

Knittingfor4
05-27-2007, 08:13 AM
My camera has never been out of Auto or Movie mode. I'm not even sure how to get continuous shooting. Here's a pic of what I mean. DH pressed the button while ds was facing the crowd. They only stand there for a second before going back to line up. Anyway, this is what we ended up with because the camera was too slow. The lady across the isle had a Nikon and I could hear it just clicking away! I bet she got a face shot of her kid LOL! BTW, that's pretty zoomed up. We were far away. I was actually able to get very close ups of just his face from where we were by using full zoom. A couple of them aren't very grainy either. Oh heck, I'll just throw one in here:
http://www.geocities.com/knit_for_food/slowshutter.JPG http://www.geocities.com/knit_for_food/12xZoom.JPG

coldrain
05-28-2007, 11:30 AM
The XT (and XTi) will be fast enough for sure, you will have no shutter lag with a good lens. How well they perform indoors in low light partly has to do with the lens you use. The bigger the lens opening can be (aperture), the less high a ISO setting you need to use.

With an XT/XTi and a 35mm f2 (standard focal point lens for an APS-C size sensor DSLR), a 50mm f1.8 (nice for portraits) or a 85mm f1.8 (nice for portraits at a distance) you will be able to conquor most situations. With a standard zoom lens (about 18-55mm) with f2.8 max. aperture you will be able to do ok in most situations. But then I would go for the XTi, its AF system is more reliable with 2rd party lenses.
The XT and XTi are less cut down than the D40, and its missing internal motor will mean you can not get any of above mentioned lenses that will auto focus.
Which is really a problem for lower light photography, you will need to be able to use bigger apertures to catch more light.

Knittingfor4
05-28-2007, 01:40 PM
Well I played with an XT with a 18-200 lens today. Heavy but fast. I think thats the lens I'd want so I don't have to change them and I still get what I'm getting from my 12x zoom, mostly. Does that one have a big enough apeture? I just honestly wish I didn't have to go this far. The camera store didn't have a Sony Cyber Shot H9 which I've seen very good things about. The sports mode is supposed to be super fast. But I'd want to use it indoors and the guy said the flash won't go off in sports mode :( I guess I'm just gonna have to get a dslr. Such a shame when it will never be out of auto mode. Oh well. I am leaning towards the XT even though the d40 feels more comfy in my hand. But what is it that sets the XTi apart? I know the sensor cleaner and more megapixels. I just want to make sure it performs well indoors. I'd still like to find an H9 to try!!

Visual Reality
05-28-2007, 02:27 PM
May I ask why you are so persistent on using the inferior Auto mode? A camera doesn't have a brain and will not always make the right decisions. Plus you will never get into many of its features. That's like buying a high end gaming computer and doing nothing but internet browsing and word documents.

The H9 is a good camera...however it is in the same category as what you already have - a superzoom with a small sensor. It will be no match for an SLR.

Knittingfor4
05-28-2007, 02:58 PM
May I ask why you are so persistent on using the inferior Auto mode?
As I explained in my first post I know NOTHING about photgraphy. I don't know what ISO, fstop, spot meter, apeture and stuff are. I don't know how lighting affects pictures. Don't know how lenses affect pictures. NOTHING. I just want something that I can keep pressing the button and get that facial expression I see, or the blink of an eye hug, or whatever. Other features don't matter so much to me. My only concern is that these high end cameras have way more hangups about lighting and lenses. I want to get a good combo for shooting indoors with only natural light coming through the window or inside overhead lights. If I could just stay with a point and shoot I would, but it's apparent that I can't. So I'll use a dslr on auto with the right lens and hope it turns out well. I don't look at my photos with a magnifying glass, so some of the things they showed me at the store won't matter to me.

As for the H9 I don't need it to be a match for a dslr, I just want something almost as fast. I'm happy with the picture quality I get from my Kodak P712 so if that's what you mean by matching dslr, it's not an issue. I'm looking only for speed and low light ability.

RichNY
05-28-2007, 03:10 PM
Can I suggest you take a step back for a second and purchase a really great simple to understand book called Understanding Exposure by Brian Peterson. It will show you (with easy language and great images) how to take the type of pictures you might want (sports shots, portrait with blurred background, etc.) very easily by using the Aperture Priority and Speed Priority settings on your camera.

*You will never even think about modes such as sport, night, portrait or Auto again since setting one value and letting the camera pick the other is as simple as putting the camera in a 'mode'.

You will also get a better idea as to what 'speed' lens you need- do you need an f/1.8, f/2.8, or can you get by with f/4 and f/5.6 as the fastest speed. This book can be read in a day, although you'll find yourself reading it over and over again once you get your camera.

I'm suggesting it now because its the book you'll buy once you purchase your camera and reading it now will help you to make a better purchase decision.

I came to this site last summer with no DSLR experience (and $10k more cash than I have today) all set to buy one of the soon to be released Nikon D80s. After lots of research and advice by Coldrain and others I purchased my first DSLR, a Canon 30D. Once you start taking pictures you will find yourself wanting more and more out of your camera. For me, I was happy to get a 30D that shot 5 frames/second and was fine until I started taking lots of indoor action sequences of my nephew scoring in hockey when I wanted faster focusing and the ability to shoot 8 frames/second.

The point I'm trying to make is that you are probably fooling yourself into thinking you will be using the camera on Auto mode only once you get a little knowlege on how simple it is to use Av and Tv modes and the control you'll get over your images.

RichNY
05-28-2007, 03:20 PM
I'm looking only for speed and low light ability.

I don't want to dismiss what you've just said but rather to explain to you that speed and low light ability are the two most costly things when it comes to cameras and lenses: and the cost differences are BIG.

Whether with a point and shoot or DSLR you do need to know a bit about light to take pictures. I will use a simple example. You see a beautiful background and have your child pose in front of it. The sun is coming from behind your children. Guess what won't be clearly visable if you shoot in Auto? Your children's faces.

I'm guessing you are finding the shopping experience a little 'overwhelming'- we all did. I started just looking for $200-$300 digital camera to take on vacation with me to Tahiti & Bora Bora last summer and wound up finding I had a real interest in Photography. (I used the Sony H3 which took great pictures but had that dam shutter lag issue)

I'll again recommend the Understanding Exposure book to you. You will find it much easier to read and see at your own pace than to talk to a salesman in a store who is using terms quicker than you can absorb them, or for that matter even discussing things online- though I do recommend you being as active as possible on this forum (probably the best for beginners).

Knittingfor4
05-28-2007, 03:50 PM
Thank you RichNY, that was very helpful! I put that book on my list at the library, but I'm way down so it'd take months. I guess I'll buy it if it's that important. I would like to make the best purchase possible as I see it being the only one for several years unless something amazing happens with technology! I was just about to start researching lenses, but I think I'll read the book first.

coldrain
05-29-2007, 02:48 AM
Well I played with an XT with a 18-200 lens today. Heavy but fast. I think thats the lens I'd want so I don't have to change them and I still get what I'm getting from my 12x zoom, mostly. Does that one have a big enough apeture? I just honestly wish I didn't have to go this far. The camera store didn't have a Sony Cyber Shot H9 which I've seen very good things about. The sports mode is supposed to be super fast. But I'd want to use it indoors and the guy said the flash won't go off in sports mode :( I guess I'm just gonna have to get a dslr. Such a shame when it will never be out of auto mode. Oh well. I am leaning towards the XT even though the d40 feels more comfy in my hand. But what is it that sets the XTi apart? I know the sensor cleaner and more megapixels. I just want to make sure it performs well indoors. I'd still like to find an H9 to try!!
What sets the XTi apart to me mostly is the AF system. Its 9 point AF system is accurate, and will track moving subjects very well (depending on used lens of course).
A DSLR can flash too of course, and then you do not need such a big aperture. But I am a fan of non-flashed photos, flash robs the photos of atmosphere and so I would want the camera to suck up enough light on its own, even indoors. Especially on spontaneous non-posed photos of children being busy with something.

But if you do not mind to flash, a 18-200 lens will do, as will a Sony H9 or Canon S5 IS.

RichNY
05-29-2007, 09:49 AM
This is one of those books that you will want to own. You are going to be going back to it over and over. After the first read you'll know about choosing the right ISO, Aperture, Shutter Speed, and focal length to use for you picture. (This alone is worth the price of admission)

In future reads you'll be going back to see what settings to use for special lighting situations or to see what settings were used to create the effects you want to include in one of yours. The book also serves as a motivational coach to get you out taking great pictures- and succeeds here as well.

Understand Exposure (http://www.amazon.com/Understanding-Exposure-Photographs-Digital-Updated/dp/0817463003/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/103-9318914-2797433?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1180456877&sr=8-1) You are one click away from having it tomorrow ;)

Another great book he has when you are ready is Learning to See Creatively. The book is 100% dedicated to how to take better pictures thru composition (what goes where in frame, filling the frame, the use of lines, etc.) It was really helpful for me to develop a much better eye and nice to have a book with pictures and explanations that dealt NOTHING with ISO, Aperture, and Shutter Speeds. This was a book on how to 'design' your images for maximum impact.
Learning to See Creatively (http://www.amazon.com/Learning-See-Creatively-Composition-Photography/dp/0817441816/ref=pd_bbs_2/103-9318914-2797433?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1180456877&sr=8-2)
This link also has a bundle price with both books if you want or you could look at it next time you're in Borders or Barnes and Noble.



Thank you RichNY, that was very helpful! I put that book on my list at the library, but I'm way down so it'd take months. I guess I'll buy it if it's that important. I would like to make the best purchase possible as I see it being the only one for several years unless something amazing happens with technology! I was just about to start researching lenses, but I think I'll read the book first.

Visual Reality
05-29-2007, 03:28 PM
We just don't want you to get too over your head in search of something, and ultimately dropping upwards of $1,000 on, something you will never use to its fullest.

Would you buy an expensive gaming computer and never game? Would you buy a sports car to take to the mall and the grocery store? ;)

Knittingfor4
06-01-2007, 08:47 PM
Hehe, well I know I said I'd wait for the book, but...I had all but decided on the XTi until I read a review that said the d200 was pretty much the best camera around. Especially for not always dialing in personalized settings. Apparently it just always gives the best color and focus and isn't fooled. Plus that 5fps is exciting! So now I'm confused, cause I'd love a camera that doesn't require ME to know all the little nuances of every scene. Especially since my mom is my designated birth photographer and doesn't get technology at all - even worse than me! I don't know what the light will be like in my bedroom at whatever hour it happens, so that's a big issue for me. But spending an extra grand for just one event seems, well a bit controlling even for me LOL. I just wonder how difficult it will be for me to program in to the best of my ability what I think the lighting conditions will be in 2-3hrs on the XTi. Cause that's about where I really start to go into myself and stop responding to questions and stuff. Also, I'll be shooting indoors probably 90% of the time. And I've read that any camera can do well outdoors, that's easy.

I've also been thinking about checking out the S5 when it comes out. But I'm not sure that I'll be satisfied with anything less than a dslr when it comes to shutter lag and shot to shot time, even in a burst mode.

I know that's not very helpful to you, just wanted to get my thoughts out. :o

Rooz
06-01-2007, 10:46 PM
its a little unfair comparing an xti to a d200 though. the xti is even cheaper than the d80. you could buy an xti with some great glass for the price of just the d200 body. thats pretty damn good value.

the d200 is pretty much widely recognised as being the best prosumer body out there and the closest thing to the d200 from canon is the 30d which makes up for most of the xti shortcomings like size, ergonomics etc. keep in mind the biggest gripe with the d200 is its iso performance which you would have to say is poor in comparison to its competitors. this could be a problem for you indoors with lower light. however, iso aside, indoors means either faster glass or mounting a flash which in essential imo for good indoor photography.

when moving into 30d/ d200 territory is that these are MUCH bigger cameras than the xti so be careful that you don;t buy a big camera that you will feel uncomfortable in using.

its also a little misleading to say a camera is never fooled. i think the reviewer was just excited about the cam and made remarks like that tongue in cheek. i don;t think that sort of DSLR exists ! if you buy any of these DSLR's, (even the d40 or XT), you are going to have to put a bit of work in them to get great results. and if you do put a bit of work in them, you will get awesome photos from ANY of them.

i would strongly recommend that you handle these cameras in person becasue a DSLR is not a DSLR. they are vastly different in size, feel and setup. for example, my wife hates my D80 with a passion, (and the d80 is smaller than a d200), and loves my firends xti cos its smaller and fits her hands better. she is less likely to use manual mode and adjust settings so the things i love about the d80 are irrelevant to her. she wants small and is pushing me very hard to buy a d40 cos its so much smaller for her to use when i'm not around.

Knittingfor4
06-02-2007, 07:40 AM
That's a good point, it's already an adjustment looking at the XT/d40. I would really hate to go bigger/heavier. Do you think I could do well indoors with the right XTi setup? I'd prefer not to get the nifty fifty because there's no zoom. I'd like to just stick with the one 18-200 for everything, but the smallest number is 2.8, is that enough for indoors?

As for flash, I've seen the term "bounced". Does that mean you point it to the ceiling? I could do that, so that the flash isn't pointing right into our eyes at a very peaceful moment!

RichNY
06-02-2007, 10:52 AM
That's a good point, it's already an adjustment looking at the XT/d40. I would really hate to go bigger/heavier. Do you think I could do well indoors with the right XTi setup? I'd prefer not to get the nifty fifty because there's no zoom. I'd like to just stick with the one 18-200 for everything, but the smallest number is 2.8, is that enough for indoors?

As for flash, I've seen the term "bounced". Does that mean you point it to the ceiling? I could do that, so that the flash isn't pointing right into our eyes at a very peaceful moment!

Go with either the XT or D40- you are going to get the same quality (good or bad) with either one. If you are shooting indoors at a target close enough for a flash then an f/2.8 lens is fine. What you will realize is that with an 18-200 you going to be zooming outside of the scope of your flash though.

There are 2 types of flash- the built in one on the camera good for emergencies and when you'd like to cause red eye and the other ones that you purchase for a few hundred dollars that get mounted on your camera's hot shoe. If you want to bounce the flash (you are correct in its use) off the ceiling or a wall then this is the type you need. The built in flash just shoots straight into your subject's face.

With all the energy you are spending looking at various cameras you could have learned the most important basics about photography already. The D200 and Fuji are not what you should be looking at. The D200 isn't the best camera around by a long shot- several thousand dollars worth of long shot. Not only is it more camera than you need in terms of weight and features but it will be much more complicated for you to learn and take the type of basic pictures you want.

There is absolutely no reason for you to purchase more than an XTi or D40x for your needs. Either start with the kit lens and a 50mm f/1.8 or f/1.4 if you budget allows for the times when you will be shooting indoors w/o light. If you're budget is a bit more then buy a Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 lens instead of the kit lens and you'll be even better off.

Flip a coin, the decison between those two cameras are both fine and suitable to your needs. Just learn how to use whichever you purchase.

Knittingfor4
06-02-2007, 12:21 PM
Ok, sounds good. XTI with Tamron lens and speedlight flash. Oh and instructional books and DVDs. I've ordered Understanding Exposure and JumpStart guide to dslrs DVD. I'll also order the XTi DVD!

I've been learning a bit from reading reviews and stuff. But it'll be easier for me to absorb once I have the camera in my hand and can see it on the DVD.

RichNY
06-02-2007, 05:37 PM
Ok, sounds good. XTI with Tamron lens and speedlight flash. Oh and instructional books and DVDs. I've ordered Understanding Exposure and JumpStart guide to dslrs DVD. I'll also order the XTi DVD!

I've been learning a bit from reading reviews and stuff. But it'll be easier for me to absorb once I have the camera in my hand and can see it on the DVD.

Good first steps. Please post a review of the JumpStart guide once you've watched it so those that come after you will benefit from your purchase.

speaklightly
06-02-2007, 07:20 PM
knittingfor4-

The choice of a Canon XTi is excellent, as is the appropiate flash unit (perhaps an EX580 EX) to match that wonderful XTi camera. Please just keep close track of your subject to camera distance, and then you will do well.

Sarah

Rooz
06-02-2007, 09:43 PM
look at the sigma 18-50mmf2.8 b4 you buy the tamron. i bought the tamron first, against advice, and it didn't go well.

Knittingfor4
06-03-2007, 08:52 AM
Well they both have top notch ratings. What was the problem with the Tamron?

sjseto
06-03-2007, 10:13 AM
I think Rooz had the Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 at one point and he found the build quality to be poor. He can fill you in on the specifics.

I've had the Tamron 28-75 f/2.8 (which offers the same perspective as the 17-50 for film SLR's), for a couple of years now and have had no issues with the build quality. I'm happy with the image quality and with having a constant f/2.8 aperture available in a relatively small, light lens. But I've read posts from another user who had a used version and found lens creep (the barrel extending or retracting of its own accord when the camera is pointed down or up, respectively) to be a problem. So maybe it's just a matter of getting a good sample.

The Sigma 18-50 is a bit bigger and heavier than the Tamron but has the benefit of a smaller minimum focusing distance for macro shots.

Stephanie

Todd
06-03-2007, 02:29 PM
Most of the advice given here seems spot on. From what I'm reading, I think the discussion did get a little complex for what you're asking. But hey, you seem more interested in photography than even you thought.

Understanding Exposure is a great book, I own it and it explains the different aspects of photograhy very well so I think you'll like it. It's also somewhat of a visually-appealing "picture book"; It's not a 250 page headache.

About the cameras, from what you're asking for, all of the DSLRs would be good for you.

I forget what you're using now, but the D40, D50, D70s, Rebel XT, Rebel XTi, etc... will all get what you need done. As someone mentioned before though, the thing about the D40 is it has no autofocus lens motor. The D50, a camera built before the D40 (the D40 was also more expensive at the time) does. Personally, I own a D50. I had a choice between the D50 and D40 but I wanted the autofocus motor for future use and for other reasons (I'm really "into" photography).

I don't know if the D50 is relevant though because I think they either stopped producing it or cut back so that it probably went up in price again.

Anyway, I'm not sure how much you've tried these cameras but as someone above said, a lot of it is also about feel. Just go into a store (electronics or even better a camera store). If you have to talk to a salesman, tell them your plight so that they spare you of all of the technical details; you could always ask DCResource anyway. Try out these cameras and see if they feel right and respond as quickly as you need them.

About the D200. I thought it was funny that you mentioned it because it seems like you were led in the wrong direction. The D200 is an extremely advanced camera that contradicts what you said about how you would mainly like to leave it in auto. Let me just put it this way: I AM very technical about photography, but the D50 is sufficient for even me right now. You'd be MUCH better off getting one of the aforementioned cameras and just spending more money on the lens. This brings me to my other point.

About the lens, this is the area which I may be least knowledgeable in because I only own my kit lens. However, I am in a photo class and I have used other lenses both there and at a photo expo. Once again, as someone else mentioned, the DSLR industry speaks about mm rather than zoom X. You probably want at least 18-200mm if you REALLY wanna zoom in there. The last thing I have to say is when you are looking for a lens, you also need to take into account vibration. Unfortunately, when you zoom far in like with an 18-200 lens or higher, unless you use a tripod or "get lucky," a lot of your pictures will turn out blurred.

Special lenses are made for this with "vibration reduction," "stabilization" or whatever you wanna call it. As you guessed it, the ones with this feature are also more expensive. Basically, you get what you want to pay for. For example check these 2 lenses:

18-200mm (http://www.amazon.com/Sigma-18-200mm-3-5-6-3-Digital-Cameras/dp/B0007U0GZC/ref=sr_1_8/002-2135366-8773623?ie=UTF8&s=photo&qid=1180905883&sr=1-8)

18-200mm with stabilization (http://www.amazon.com/Sigma-18-200mm-3-5-6-3-Optical-Stabilizer/dp/B000NOSCGW/ref=sr_1_10/002-2135366-8773623?ie=UTF8&s=photo&qid=1180905883&sr=1-10)

Those are the same lens but the 2nd one has the vibration reduction. If you're gonna shop for lenses, especially online, make sure you get the one with the right mount for the camera. For instance, those 2 lenses above only fit on cameras with Nikon mounts so if you get a Canon, don't order those exact lenses, order the Canon mount version.

Don't let all of this technical talk ruin the photography for you though. We can sit here and downgrade anything until we've got you spending $50,000 on an outfit. When in reality, spending only $550, you can get some of the most amazing pictures if you really try. I'm living proof.

Rooz
06-03-2007, 05:02 PM
Well they both have top notch ratings. What was the problem with the Tamron?

as sj mentioned i bought the tamron first and had issues, i returned it for a brand new one and the second one was faulty aswell.

this is obviously purely personal experience and i'm sure lots of people have hd no problems.

Knittingfor4
06-03-2007, 07:23 PM
Thank you for the advice! I think first I will go with an indoor lens, since most of my shooting is around the house and I want to make sure to get better birth photos than last time. Then I will worry about an 18-200. Sigma is coming out with a new one that has IS in it.

Right now I have a Kodak P712. I've begun playing with the settings a bit. Using Beach mode for my son's outdoor preschool luau, and apeture priority at the Home Depot Kids Workshop. Not really sure how this made any difference LOL, but hey, I gave it a shot. I guess I'd have to sit with them and change settings and take a bunch of similar pics and just keep track of which ones were with which settings. I'm not so much interested in photography as I am in my subjects ;)

Todd
06-03-2007, 08:11 PM
Thank you for the advice! I think first I will go with an indoor lens, since most of my shooting is around the house and I want to make sure to get better birth photos than last time. Then I will worry about an 18-200. Sigma is coming out with a new one that has IS in it.

Right now I have a Kodak P712. I've begun playing with the settings a bit. Using Beach mode for my son's outdoor preschool luau, and apeture priority at the Home Depot Kids Workshop. Not really sure how this made any difference LOL, but hey, I gave it a shot. I guess I'd have to sit with them and change settings and take a bunch of similar pics and just keep track of which ones were with which settings. I'm not so much interested in photography as I am in my subjects ;)

I was in a similar circumstance not too long ago. My first one was the Kodak Z7590 (also called DX7590). Those cameras are good for starters but yeah, there's a HUGE difference in response time and continuous speed between SLRs and those Kodak cameras.

Sounds to me like you're on the right track! And as soon as you get that book, you can read each section (shutter speed, aperture, ISO) and you will understand those in no time. :)

RichNY
06-03-2007, 09:19 PM
I'm not so much interested in photography as I am in my subjects ;)

LOL- I think we all feel the same way. It's just that to get our subjects to look their best we begin to realize that it's US that are the limitting factor not our equipment. That's when we are stuck learning all that 'stuff' about f stops, depth of field, light, etc. I can tell you with 100% certainty if there was a camera with an auto setting that I could have used as opposed to everything I've had to learn I would have bought it also. Unfortunately, reality sets in and we find ourselves into photography.