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YZdirtrider13
05-20-2007, 10:50 AM
i hvae been looking at dSLRs for a while now, but i actually have enough money to get one. i have about a $1000 budget max, but would be willing to sacfrifice a bit for a cheaper camera. this price has to include a kit lens, or a body and some other lens.




Budget

* What budget have you allocated for buying this camera? Please be as specific as possible.
$1000

Size

* What size camera are you looking for? Or does size not matter at all to you?
doesnt matter

Features

How many megapixels will suffice for you?
not a big deal. overall quality is more important

* What optical zoom will you need? (None, Standard = 3x-4x, Ultrazoom = 10x-12x, Other - Specify)
not expecting much with a kit lens...

* How important is “image quality” to you? (Rate using a scale of 1-10)
10

Do you care for manual controls?
yes
General Usage

* What will you generally use the camera for?
sports photography, outdoor shooting but i would like good low-light performance as well

* Will you be making big prints of your photos or not?
probably not, but it would be nice to have the ability. not really a deciding factor.

Will you be shooting a lot of indoor photos or low light photos?
some.
Will you be shooting sports and/or action photos?
yes. lots.
Miscellaneous

Are there particular brands you like or hate?
any mainstream brand (canon, nikon) that has a large selection of accessories will be fine.

Are there particular models you already have in mind?
d50, 350d, 400d

(If applicable) Do you need any of the following special features? (Wide Angle, Image Stabilization, Weatherproof, Hotshoe, Rotating LCD)
no

mcenut
05-20-2007, 11:14 AM
Are there particular models you already have in mind?
d50, 350d, 400d


Take you pick. All will work well and are available within your budget. The only thing to consider is this. A SLR purchase brings with it a significant future investment in the interchangeable lenses. Three, five years down the line you may want to replace the camera body and not have to replace all the lenses you have acquired.

So it really boils down to: Do you like Canon or Nikon? That is it. Buying a SLR is like going to Harvard or Yale. Both will get you places, but forever taint your allegiance.

toriaj
05-20-2007, 11:29 AM
All too true, mcenut!

The best thing to do is to go to the store and play with the cameras. See which one feels "right" to you. That counts for a lot. And no matter which camera you choose, it will be a good one. Don't worry.

YZdirtrider13
05-20-2007, 12:20 PM
between the d50 and the 350d, i like the d50 better. is the 400d similar to the 350d?

YZdirtrider13
05-20-2007, 01:23 PM
All too true, mcenut!

The best thing to do is to go to the store and play with the cameras. See which one feels "right" to you. That counts for a lot. And no matter which camera you choose, it will be a good one. Don't worry.
i see you have a d50... how do you like that 70-300?

RichNY
05-20-2007, 02:11 PM
I am not a fan of the Rebel family of cameras because I find them uncomfortable for my hands and would also pick a D50 over them.

If I were in your position though I would purchase a used Canon 20D (about $450) and a Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 lens. The Canon 20D is a much better built camera and basically the same thing as the current $1000+ 30D except with a slightly smaller viewfinder and no spot metering mode which you won't miss anyway. You can even shoot at 5fps as opposed to the 3fps of the other models.

The Tamron is an excellent lens optically and has a fast aperture for great low light shots- definately a much higher class of glass than you will find with any mfg. kit lens.

With this kit you will find yourself adding glass over time but not needing to replace either your camera body or your lens. Even people with 1D Mark IIs tend to hold on and still use their 20Ds with a different lens mounted on it.

Don't hesitate to purchase a good condition higher end used body in favor a newer lessor camera.

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/eos_20d-review/index.shtml

fionndruinne
05-20-2007, 02:16 PM
I'm not fond of the 20D. It's rather clunky, and outdated. Tiny LCD, may not mean much to some, but I find a viewable size to be helpful.

YZdirtrider13
05-20-2007, 02:24 PM
i wanted to narrow it down, not add more options :rolleyes:

but i still appreciate all the suggestsions, i want to get the best deal possible

toriaj
05-20-2007, 09:23 PM
i see you have a d50... how do you like that 70-300?

I really like it, especially at the lower end. It loses contrast and sharpness at the higher end, but it isn't usually noticeable unless the subject is still rather small in the 300mm frame.

Honest Gaza
05-20-2007, 09:40 PM
Any of the cameras you have nominated will serve your purpose.

Comments are often made that the "feel" of the Canon 350D/400D is hard to get used to if you have big hands. In the immortal words of Colonel Potter...."Horse Hockey".

The average garden variety person will adapt easily to any shape "mainstream" camera. If it does feel too small, then buy a Battery Extender Unit.

Personally, I prefer the Nikon D50 viewfinder over the Canon 400D, but the menu layout of the Canon 400D over the Nikon D50. So there are pros and cons for both camera types.

You'll enjoy your camera no matter which way you go.

mcenut
05-20-2007, 09:50 PM
is the 400d similar to the 350d?

Simple answer is yes. The 400D is just the replacement model for the 350D and is the same relative size. It does have improved features but basically is the same camera.

I have heard that a lot of people like the Nikon D50 over the Canon 350D due to size (the Nikon is bigger.) If that is also your reason, then I'd echo RichNY's recommendation of the Canon 20D. It is basically a better and larger version of the 350D. However the 20D suffers from higher accessory prices than it's diminutive cousin.

If size and price mattered, I would go with the Nikon.

coldrain
05-21-2007, 04:06 AM
Simple answer is yes. The 400D is just the replacement model for the 350D and is the same relative size. It does have improved features but basically is the same camera.

I have heard that a lot of people like the Nikon D50 over the Canon 350D due to size (the Nikon is bigger.) If that is also your reason, then I'd echo RichNY's recommendation of the Canon 20D. It is basically a better and larger version of the 350D. However the 20D suffers from higher accessory prices than it's diminutive cousin.

If size and price mattered, I would go with the Nikon.
What accessories would be more expensive? Both are a Canon EOS... so I can really not think of what accessories would be more expensive for a 20D.

Rooz
05-21-2007, 04:12 AM
if you cant stretch your budget to a d80 i can;t see why you wouldnl;t go for a 400d. 10mp and the latest sensor technology. the d50 is a great camera but its no 400d. unelss of course you dont like the feel of the rebel, then i understand the choice issue.

i;d be intersted to know why you haven;t considered the alpha and k10.

mcenut
05-21-2007, 09:28 AM
What accessories would be more expensive? Both are a Canon EOS... so I can really not think of what accessories would be more expensive for a 20D.

Battery Grip, Remote Switch and Wireless Remote are three accessories that come to mind that are significantly cheaper for the 350D/400D than for the 20D/30D.

coldrain
05-21-2007, 09:59 AM
Battery Grip, Remote Switch and Wireless Remote are three accessories that come to mind that are significantly cheaper for the 350D/400D than for the 20D/30D.
The OP is not someone who would buy a battery grip, nor the other items.
It is just a very odd thing to bring up. Instead of lenses and flashes, which do matter, and which are exactly the same for either camera.

If you want to bring up costs of wireless remote and battery grips into the discussion, then also look at what that would cost on Nikon and the other platforms mentioned.

mcenut
05-22-2007, 05:36 AM
The OP is not someone who would buy a battery grip, nor the other items.
It is just a very odd thing to bring up. Instead of lenses and flashes, which do matter, and which are exactly the same for either camera.

If you want to bring up costs of wireless remote and battery grips into the discussion, then also look at what that would cost on Nikon and the other platforms mentioned.

I have. You should check too before making uninformed statements.