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derekinla
02-07-2006, 07:47 PM
I'm not sure if there is a clear answer to this but how long does the mirror/shutter on a Nikon last? Is that a part that will eventually fail? What will fail first in a well cared for Nikon dSLR?

beachluvr
02-07-2006, 09:19 PM
I'm not sure if there is a clear answer to this but how long does the mirror/shutter on a Nikon last? Is that a part that will eventually fail? What will fail first in a well cared for Nikon dSLR?

(Forgive me if this shows up twice, I think I forgot to hit submit)

That is a question that is sure to get a lot of heated responses, so I'll decline to answer except to say I have 2 classic Nikon film SLRs that have been around the world many times and have never had mirror or shutter (two different components) fail. Your results may vary, tax and license not included, offer void where prohibited.

ktixx
02-07-2006, 09:40 PM
Usually the more expensive the SLR the longer the shutter will last. The mechanism that flips the mirror is not a motor, so you don't have to worry about that burning out, however the shutters do have a life. Although this is entirely based on estimates I beleive the D70 is rated for 50,000 frames, and I would assume the D50 is the same. The Canon 300D (I know this is a Nikon forum) is rated for 50,000 frames and the 20D and 5D are rated for 100,000. Once you get up to the professional bodies (1d's) they are rated for 150,000 - 200,000 frames. I would assume Nikon uses the same ratings, so the D2X is probably rated for 150,000 - 200,000 frames and then it goes down from there.
Again - these are all estimates and your shutter could last for many more, or many less frames than the estimate.
Hope this helps
Ken

derekinla
02-08-2006, 08:03 AM
Thanks for the info.

I asked the question because I've always been fascinated about "planned obsolescence" in consumer electronics (or any other consumer products for that matter).

Check Out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence

It's never advertised by the manufacturers or even openly discussed very much but it's a fact of life in the modern economy we live in. If things were build to last, assembly lines would not be as busy. Toasters Ovens last 5 years because... well, they're designed to last five years. The next potential big ticket item that kinda frightens me in terms of longevitiy is a big screen LCD or plasma HDTV with a 4 digit price tag.....

Back to my D50..... Should the shutter/mirror mechanism (or camera in general) be lubricated or serviced at some point?

Ray Schnoor
02-08-2006, 08:10 AM
Thanks for the info.

I asked the question because I've always been fascinated about "planned obsolescence" in consumer electronics (or any other consumer products for that matter).

Check Out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence

It's never advertised by the manufacturers or even openly discussed very much but it's a fact of life in the modern economy we live in. If things were build to last, assembly lines would not be as busy. Toasters Ovens last 5 years because... well, they're designed to last five years. The next potential big ticket item that kinda frightens me in terms of longevitiy is a big screen LCD or plasma HDTV with a 4 digit price tag.....

Back to my D50..... Should the shutter/mirror mechanism (or camera in general) be lubricated or serviced at some point?
I don't think that there is any reccommended servicing required for any part of the camera (just firmware updates). You just keep going until it fails. Fortunately, I have never had a digital camera fail. I do have a Nikon Coolpix 5000(~4 years old) that has a sticky button that does not always work, but other than that, the only digital camera that I have ever had to have serviced is a Polaroid DMC1e, which is probably 5-10 years old.

As to toaster ovens, my current one is at least 15 years old.

derekinla
02-08-2006, 09:23 AM
Wow that's one fantastic toaster oven.....

My parents have a canister vacuum cleaner from sunbeam that's older than I am... and I'm in my 4th decade of life!! They don't make em like they use too!

ktixx
02-08-2006, 11:17 AM
I don't think that there is any reccommended servicing required for any part of the camera (just firmware updates). You just keep going until it fails. Fortunately, I have never had a digital camera fail. I do have a Nikon Coolpix 5000(~4 years old) that has a sticky button that does not always work, but other than that, the only digital camera that I have ever had to have serviced is a Polaroid DMC1e, which is probably 5-10 years old.

As to toaster ovens, my current one is at least 15 years old.
I would definitely agree to just use it until you can't anymore. The Nikon Coolpix 5000 that is spoken of is not a dSLR and therefore does not have a real shutter/reflex mechanism. Therefore the camera shutter can't and won't really "fail" but rather just die because of electrical/processor problems. I would say that depending on your use you could probably go 5 - 10 years without having a shutter problem (with an SLR), If the shutter does fail you could always get it fixed, however it may not be worth spending the money on an obselete camera (5 - 10 years down the road. As Ray said before, Just use it until it breaks...if you are really into photography and really interested in your dSLR you will be dying to get a new camera in 5 years...actually probably 2-3 years :p
Good Luck,
Ken

beachluvr
02-08-2006, 11:38 AM
Back to my D50..... Should the shutter/mirror mechanism (or camera in general) be lubricated or serviced at some point?

With film SLRs, having an occasional "tuneup" was something many users had done. Shutters were calibrated to assure speed accuracy and yes mirrors were lubricated. Important to note that this service was performed by a certified PROFESSIONAL calibrator.

I haven't seen anyone offer such a service for the sub-$1000 entry level DSLRs, but I haven't looked.

An aside ... I cringe when I see cameras on display at local electronics big box stores with their mirror exposed, sometime for months at a time. I would not want to be the person who buys that display model.

Ray Schnoor
02-08-2006, 11:41 AM
I would definitely agree to just use it until you can't anymore. The Nikon Coolpix 5000 that is spoken of is not a dSLR and therefore does not have a real shutter/reflex mechanism. Therefore the camera shutter can't and won't really "fail" but rather just die because of electrical/processor problems. I would say that depending on your use you could probably go 5 - 10 years without having a shutter problem (with an SLR), If the shutter does fail you could always get it fixed, however it may not be worth spending the money on an obselete camera (5 - 10 years down the road. As Ray said before, Just use it until it breaks...if you are really into photography and really interested in your dSLR you will be dying to get a new camera in 5 years...actually probably 2-3 years :p
Good Luck,
Ken
Ken is right. Hope I didn't mislead anyone into thinking that the Coolpix 5000 was a dSLR. In this instance, I was referring to whether or not digital cameras in general need to have service before they are broken.

You probably have just as good a chance to have electrical/processor problems with a dSLR before the shutter fails anyway.

Ray.

derekinla
02-08-2006, 12:50 PM
An aside ... I cringe when I see cameras on display at local electronics big box stores with their mirror exposed, sometime for months at a time. I would not want to be the person who buys that display model.

I know what you mean beachluvr. When I see the D50 or 350 XT at Circuit City or Best Buy with the lens missing... perched up "naked" on that plastic display mount with the SLR mirror exposed for everyone to see... I always shake my head in dissapointment. Have you noticed that there is always a big fat greasy fingerprint smack in the middle of the mirror..... It's so wrong..... You know that management is gonna put that model up for sale as a floor sample at 20% off at some point. Yikes!

D70FAN
02-08-2006, 03:34 PM
I'm not sure if there is a clear answer to this but how long does the mirror/shutter on a Nikon last? Is that a part that will eventually fail?

50K releases seems to be the consensus, for a D70, with several reports (on Nikonians) of over 75K and going strong, and a few at 100K+. There was one reported failure at 40K. The cost for replacement was $200.


What will fail first in a well cared for Nikon dSLR?


Besides the shutter probably nothing. There were a few exposure circuit failures in some early D70's (mine was one of the lucky few), covered under waranty, and turned in 2 weeks, from shipped to received. But 12,000 frames and a year later the "camper" is still happy.

Lens contacts may need cleaning (probably not), and the flash strobe capacitor, xenon tube, or mechanism, may go in extreme use, but no more likely than on a film SLR.

Since I have no plans to print above 13 x 19 I would expect to be using this same camera for the forseeable future, as 6MP works just fine. So I'll let you know about the shutter in 3-4 years.

But... there is always the tug of technology, and the D200 is like a sirens song. Seems my bank balance is the soundproof wall.;)

beachluvr
02-08-2006, 05:22 PM
I know what you mean beachluvr. When I see the D50 or 350 XT at Circuit City or Best Buy with the lens missing... perched up "naked" on that plastic display mount with the SLR mirror exposed for everyone to see... I always shake my head in dissapointment. Have you noticed that there is always a big fat greasy fingerprint smack in the middle of the mirror..... It's so wrong..... You know that management is gonna put that model up for sale as a floor sample at 20% off at some point. Yikes!

I'd probably run from it at 80% off. Not that used cameras in general are a bad thing but a demo DSLR with that big hole in front? Uh uh

britkev
02-19-2006, 01:01 AM
To get back to the original post, we haven't mentioned the "free film" factor of digital. For an amateur, shooting film meant that for anything but the most special of occasions we would limit ourselves to 36 exposures, maybe 72. The price of film and processing meant that your film SLR would not reach 50,000 actuations for decades... my father just replaced his 25 year old Pentax body.

These days, film is free, we come back from a weekend away with hundreds of shots, and even a walk in the park can generate 50 pics without thinking, so the camera is going to hit it's life expectancy of 50,000 shots a lot sooner.

With highly automated manufacture the cost of a new body will soon be cheaper than the cost of having a highly skilled technician work on your worn out one.

My solution: I have resolved to put five bucks in my piggy bank every time I shoot a hundred shots on my new D50, a fraction of what that would have cost me in film. By the time my D50 expires I will have enough to buy a very nice replacement.

Incidentally, pg 117 of the D50 manual contains a recommendation that you have it inspected every year or two, and serviced every three to five years.

derekinla
02-19-2006, 09:43 PM
:)

$5 in the Piggy Bank for every 100 pics..... Great idea!!!