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View Full Version : Just ordered my 50mm f/1.8



sherlock
02-02-2006, 08:13 PM
Hey all,

I just ordered the 50mm f/1.8D today from B+H :D I'm really excited to get it here, can't wait to try it out indoors/no flash (for the first time I might add :p ). Well thanks for reading and I'll let you know how it goes :)


Andrew

Esoterra
02-02-2006, 08:29 PM
Congrats on the new lens. The 50mm 1.8 Nikkor is a great indoor lens. I especially like getting shots of the kids near windows because it does a great job capturing natural light. Also, do a lot of shooting in Aperture mode and play with depth of field. You will be amazed at how good the lens is, allowing you to be very creative. On the other hand, there is a lot to be said about using a flash with a great diffuser...

ryan112ryan
02-03-2006, 07:56 AM
could someone talk about using fixed focal length lenses? i have only used zoom lenses and would like to know how practical they are. how much would i benifit from my sigma 18-50mm f2.8?

erichlund
02-03-2006, 09:05 AM
There was a time when zoom lenses were not very good. If you were pro, you used fixed focal length lenses for the quality they represented. Generally speaking, they are still better, but great strides have been made in the quality of zoom lenses.

Still, there are a few lenses you should always keep in your arsenel. One of these is the fast normal lens. Of course, on dSLRs, the "normal" lens is now the 35mm, as the 50mm is a short telephoto. In the Nikon line, the 35mm f2 is a very nice lens that has decent speed and a normal angle of view (Normal means it doesn't distort depth of view like a telephoto (flattens) or wide angle (extends)).

The 50mm f1.8 is a crowd favorite, but is not a normal lens on a dSLR (except full frame, something Nikon doesn't do). However, for about $100, you can't go too wrong, and it's a good length for portraits.

The traditional portrait lens, the 85mm is now equivalent to 127.5mm angle of view, so is actually outside the traditional 80-120 range thought to be the best for portraits. Still both 85s are designed for excellent bokeh (creamy background), so they are still relied on for this use. I don't have one of these...yet.

Though it may be considered too sharp, the 60mm Micro, and my AI-S 55mm micro, are 90mm and 82.5mm respectively in angle of view. The bokeh on my 55 is, in my opinion, excellent, so it's going to fill the role as my formal portrait lens, while the 50mm f1.8, with it's autofocus, will fill the role of candid portait length.

Of course, for everyday use, I still mount the 18-200VR because it's pretty decent quality, gives me a really wide angle as well as a decently long telephoto and lots of convenience.

Jason25
02-03-2006, 09:40 AM
Congrats, you'll use that lens a lot :) Mine is usually on my camera unless I'm outdoors and want zoom :D

sherlock
02-07-2006, 12:23 PM
Hey everyone,

The lens finally came today! :D I just shot a whole roll in about 20 minutes...I'm seriously in love with it. Just thought I'd update you guys, now I'm off to shoot some more! :)


Andrew

beachluvr
02-07-2006, 01:24 PM
Hey everyone,

The lens finally came today! :D I just shot a whole roll in about 20 minutes...I'm seriously in love with it. Just thought I'd update you guys, now I'm off to shoot some more! :)


Andrew

I could list 100 reasons I am in love with prime lenses, especially fast ones! No "serious" SLR I've ever owned didn't have a collection of the best prime lenses I could get. Zooms have their place too.

I've seen some of your work in the other thread ... no doubt you have the eye and the mind ... having the tool just makes it all the better.

sherlock
02-07-2006, 01:46 PM
I could list 100 reasons I am in love with prime lenses, especially fast ones! No "serious" SLR I've ever owned didn't have a collection of the best prime lenses I could get. Zooms have their place too.

I've seen some of your work in the other thread ... no doubt you have the eye and the mind ... having the tool just makes it all the better.

Thanks beachluvr :D I really think the new lens will help me get more creative with more control of DOF and such...I'm actually really starting to like the 'prime mentality' and the 50mm focal length in general. I took a shot of the 50 mounted on my cam for a friend so I figured I'd post it here too just for kicks.

beachluvr
02-07-2006, 02:03 PM
No doubt that is a fine piece of equipment and likely more capable than some of the newer low-priced DSLRs. The art of photography has little to do with the highest megapixels or latest gimmicks. Controlling DOF gets really limiting with slower lenses. With your new lens you get it all when you need it ... fast shutter speed, wide aperature range control and low ISO plus unbeatable sharpness. Hope to see more of your stuff in the photo forum.

coldrain
02-07-2006, 02:30 PM
I could list 100 reasons I am in love with prime lenses, especially fast ones! No "serious" SLR I've ever owned didn't have a collection of the best prime lenses I could get. Zooms have their place too.

I've seen some of your work in the other thread ... no doubt you have the eye and the mind ... having the tool just makes it all the better.
Try to find yourself a Minolta AF f1.4 85mm G, its a great lens and I am sure it will impress you.

beachluvr
02-07-2006, 02:48 PM
Try to find yourself a Minolta AF f1.4 85mm G, its a great lens and I am sure it will impress you.

Thanks (no ... sincerely). That would be a great lens to own. I own a couple of very nice 85mm lens for my work cameras that I use for portraits and am totally in love with them.

I likely won't do it for the 5D because I bought that as kind of a bridge between my pocket cam that is ALWAYS with me and my work cameras. The 5D is intended mostly for fun/family/vacations/hobbies and maybe some personal creative work. That will explain why Anti Shake was a feature I liked, a lot of my use for it will be handheld under widely-ranging conditions.

This will surprise you, coldrain, but I'm not sure I will own the 5D for a long time. I jumped on it when I did almost exclusively because of KM's announcement and I wanted one. If I didn't buy it immediately I wouldn't have the chance again. I'll post a owner/user review on it sometime soon, I haven't had the time to play with it much, but I'll give you a preview.

I may have been happier with the Sigma lens.

I haven't and likely won't be able to "compare" them for quality, but my comment is based on one simple little thing ... the Sigma has a switch to lock the zoom, the KM does not. Of all my cameras I have never had a problem with "zoom creep". With the KM lens, all I have to do is point the camera downward and the entire lens extends. This isn't "creep" it's obscene! No reviewer has ever mentioned this but KM should be shot for not having a zoom lock switch on that lens.

erichlund
02-07-2006, 07:00 PM
Of all my cameras I have never had a problem with "zoom creep". With the KM lens, all I have to do is point the camera downward and the entire lens extends. This isn't "creep" it's obscene! No reviewer has ever mentioned this but KM should be shot for not having a zoom lock switch on that lens.
Which lens is that?

I've discovered the same issue with the Nikkor 18-200. Once you get past about 75mm, it's steady as a rock, but before you get there, if you point it skyward, it'll close up like a turtle going into it's shell. I suspect it's part of the compromise of the triple tube design. I've never seen a lens with three sections before. Guess I won't be using it to take 60mm shots of the ceiling from a tripod.

beachluvr
02-07-2006, 08:03 PM
Which lens is that?

It's the KM 18 - 200 DT. Only had it a week. Creep to me meant the lens would move a little once you set it (and also described this kid I knew in high school, but we won't go there).

If you tilt the camera downward with this lens it will fully extend to it's almost 7" glory. Oh like when you carry the camera around your neck or place it in a camera case ...

Then you go to use it. You compose your shot and maybe want to wait a minute before taking it, or tilt the camera downward slightly to look at the LCD status screen on the back and BINGO the lens extends. Grrrrr. After a week it's so loose I think it would extend if I breath too hard.

I have a bag full of zoom lenses and none them have even a hint of creep. I know Jeff tested it and liked it, I wonder if I got a bad apple?

erichlund
02-07-2006, 09:41 PM
It's the KM 18 - 200 DT. Only had it a week. Creep to me meant the lens would move a little once you set it (and also described this kid I knew in high school, but we won't go there).
I wonder if the Sigma and Tamron varieties of this lens show this same tendency? Mine's the Nikon.

coldrain
02-08-2006, 01:37 AM
I wonder if the Sigma and Tamron varieties of this lens show this same tendency? Mine's the Nikon.
I do not think the Sigma does. The KM is derived from the Tamron, so the Tamron may also have this problem..

beachluvr
02-08-2006, 11:40 PM
I do not think the Sigma does. The KM is derived from the Tamron, so the Tamron may also have this problem..

The Tamron for KM has a lock switch. I know this got a little off subject in the Nikon thread, sorry guys, but apparently Erich had the same problem with a Nikkor so hopefully this is useful info to all

erichlund
02-09-2006, 08:45 AM
I do not think the Sigma does. The KM is derived from the Tamron, so the Tamron may also have this problem..
Well, I have no evidence, but the fact that the Sigma has a zoom lock is a possible indicator that lens creep can occur. It's quoted as for locking to avoid lens creep during transport. If it'll creep in the bag, draw your own conclusion.

coldrain
02-09-2006, 09:48 AM
Even my Sigma 18-50 f2.8 EX DC has a lock... but you can not force it to creep, no matter what you do. Accelleration, gravity, no creep (except the one abusing the lens). And this 18-50 f2.8 is heavier than the 18-200mm (445 g vs 385 g, 84mm vs 78mm for the Nikon mount versions).

So, maybe the 18-200 does creep, but the presence of the lock does not mean it creeps.

beachluvr
02-09-2006, 09:58 AM
Well, I have no evidence, but the fact that the Sigma has a zoom lock is a possible indicator that lens creep can occur. It's quoted as for locking to avoid lens creep during transport. If it'll creep in the bag, draw your own conclusion.

To be clear, I thought the lock switch was there for the same reason, so the lens would stay in place during transport. Sounds like a good idea, although my Nikon and other zoom lenses for my film cameras never seemed to need such a lock.

What this KM lens has is not "creep", it's like a 20 hp motor extending the lens everytime the camera is turned lens down. If the few models of 18 - 200 mm zooms that recently hit the market (from Tamron, KM, Sigma, Nikon, etc ... and who really knows for sure who literally manufacturers for them) are all of similar design, why would some have a zoom lock switch and others don't?

I'll tell you from real life experience, it looks like a good thing to have.

Now ... since I don't own a Tamron or Sigma can anybody tell me if the lock switch only works in the position where you would normally transport the lens, or can it be locked in any shooting position? Reason for the question is there are times one would want to compose a shot, then wait for the action and he/she might tilt the camera downward to look at the status screen or maybe just for comfort. You don't want the zoom lens extending and losing your zoom setting when that happens.

coldrain
02-09-2006, 10:02 AM
Using the lock while making photos is fine. All it does is to block the zoom mechanism, the lens remains functional. I know from experience, I have mistaken the lock switch for the M/AF switch on my Sigma 18-50mm f2.8 EX DC at times.

jcon
02-09-2006, 10:50 AM
My Sigma 18-125 will not allow me to lock the lens while using it. Only when camera is off.

beachluvr
02-09-2006, 11:00 AM
My Sigma 18-125 will not allow me to lock the lens while using it. Only when camera is off.

Hmmm, interesting. Thanks.

jcon
02-09-2006, 11:03 AM
I need to correct myself... the camera doesnt have to be off, I can lock it when its on, but if i zoom, and try to lock it, the lock switch wont lock. It only locks at 18mm.

D70FAN
02-09-2006, 11:43 AM
I need to correct myself... the camera doesnt have to be off, I can lock it when its on, but if i zoom, and try to lock it, the lock switch wont lock. It only locks at 18mm.

That is the way a zoom lock works. The idea is that when you are carrying it on a neckstrap, or lens down, the lens won't extend, (potentially causing painful injury on longer straps) when locked. That is the case for all zoom-locks I have used.

jcon
02-09-2006, 11:57 AM
Thanks for clarifying, George! I kinda figured that was the case, I was just answering beachluvrs question about being able to lock in any shooting position.

beachluvr
02-09-2006, 12:06 PM
Thanks George and jcon. That was my assumption as well. With most lenses having it lock in a shooting position wouldn't be necessary. With mine (only a week old and hardly used) I could use it both for storage conditions AND shooting conditions. But of course, that's not really the right solution to the problem. No other lens I've owned exhibits this behavior and no one else seems to be posting that they have seen anything as extreme as this. It's just annoying. I may test KM/Sony's tech people on this to see if I just have a defective one.

D70FAN
02-09-2006, 01:31 PM
Thanks George and jcon. That was my assumption as well. With most lenses having it lock in a shooting position wouldn't be necessary. With mine (only a week old and hardly used) I could use it both for storage conditions AND shooting conditions. But of course, that's not really the right solution to the problem. No other lens I've owned exhibits this behavior and no one else seems to be posting that they have seen anything as extreme as this. It's just annoying. I may test KM/Sony's tech people on this to see if I just have a defective one.

Yup. I would try to get it replaced. A new lens should be pretty snug. My 18-125 (after 18 months) is just starting to creep pointed straight up or down, but not bad. The local Sigma repair shop seems to think that this can be snugged up, but it's not a serious enough problem.

bbarlow641
02-15-2006, 08:19 AM
I think I made a mistake when I bought my D70. I passed up the kit lens to use instead a couple of Nikon AF lenses I had from the film era (about 20 years old). Increasingly unhappy with the sharpness of the 35-70 lens of the pair, I went shopping at the local camera store armed with info from this forum. Took shots with my lens, a comparable new Nikon zoom ($700+), and the 50mm 1.8. When I looked at the results on the computer screen, I burned rubber to get back to the store before closing time. They met B&H's price on top of it.

The shots I've included are crops (unretouched) from 3 photos taken from about the same place (give or take a foot or so.) The zooms were both at 70mm, so sharpness could be expected to suffer some, but the difference 20 or so years has made in zoom lenses is quite noticeable. I wonder what the kit lens would have been like...

Thanks for pointing me toward a good buy!

Ben