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View Full Version : Anyone Using Filters with Their dSLR???



thesween
01-21-2006, 06:57 PM
Specifically, I miss using a circular polarizer, which I used extensively with all my film bodies. A CP could make the sky pop and likewise make some magic with fall foliage, and a CP also eliminates glare. Any input appreciated much...

sherlock
01-21-2006, 07:52 PM
Specifically, I miss using a circular polarizer, which I used extensively with all my film bodies. A CP could make the sky pop and likewise make some magic with fall foliage, and a CP also eliminates glare. Any input appreciated much...

Hey,

I couldn't agree with you more about the circular polarizer. I love the extra saturation it gives and how I can take the glare off of alot of the things I shoot. I wonder how using a polarizer on the lens vs. faking it in photoshop would compare.

Andrew

ktixx
01-21-2006, 08:01 PM
Specifically, I miss using a circular polarizer, which I used extensively with all my film bodies. A CP could make the sky pop and likewise make some magic with fall foliage, and a CP also eliminates glare. Any input appreciated much...
I don't quite understand the post, I use a circular polarizer all the time on my DSLR, the only reason you would miss it is if you don't buy one...

ridewya
01-27-2006, 09:06 PM
I use filters for all of my lenses..the brand I use and trust is only B+W Multi resistant Coating...never let me down...even on my 12-24mm lens or 80-200mm F2.8..perfect every time:p ;)

kanderson42
01-31-2006, 10:04 PM
Graduated neutral densities really help add dynamic range to digital cameras. Ever tried to shoot something outside in the shade? the sky is always blown out if the shade is properly exposed. Graduated ND filters are dark on top and clear on the bottom and come in several different stops. I use the cokin system because they are cheap and you can move the filter up and down, with the round ones you are stuck with the graduation in the middle. The other and sometimes better option is to use fill flash.

ktixx
01-31-2006, 10:24 PM
Graduated neutral densities really help add dynamic range to digital cameras. Ever tried to shoot something outside in the shade? the sky is always blown out if the shade is properly exposed. Graduated ND filters are dark on top and clear on the bottom and come in several different stops. I use the cokin system because they are cheap and you can move the filter up and down, with the round ones you are stuck with the graduation in the middle. The other and sometimes better option is to use fill flash.
The best ND filter is a digital one :) :D check out Fred Miranda's Tutorial (http://www.fredmiranda.com/article_2/). With a digital ND filter you can properly expose for the sky and the landscape, you don't have worry about carying around multiple ND filters depending on how bright the sky is.
Ken

kanderson42
02-02-2006, 10:33 PM
That works well if you have alot of time to produce an image and can take the same picture twice. Most of my work is for a newspaper so i dont have the luxury of taking the same picture twice. I will only use a graduated ND for special situations, most of the time i use fill flash or just deal with losing the sky.
I may try the photoshop thing when i actually get some time to myself.

kanderson42
02-02-2006, 10:49 PM
After reading that article a little more closley that technique is considered unethical for press photographers because it is merging 2 images together. I know its not quite like stamping in a football but people do get fired for things like that. Its still something i want to try when i shoot for myself.

derekinla
02-03-2006, 01:16 PM
Is there a situation where you wouldn't want a circular polarizer on when outdoors? Or can you pretty much leave on your camera the whole time?

Bullitt
02-03-2006, 08:01 PM
I do not think it would do much good on cloudy days as I've been told, but they work nice in certain situations on sunny days. I use a Hoya UV filter on my lens all the time for protection more than anything.

thesween
02-03-2006, 09:30 PM
For years I used a UV or 1A Skylight filter for protection, thinking it made sense. Then, a wizened photog mentor of mine made this observation to me; unless you put the absolute finest, best(meaning REALLY expensive)filters in front of your well-made lens, you are compromising the glass you spent a small fortune for in the first place. Simply put, why put crappy glass in front of great glass? Since then, I gave up on "protective filters."