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View Full Version : F100 users view of the D70



sherlock
01-07-2006, 08:06 PM
Hey everyone,

I really have nothing to do right now so I thought I'd give you all my thoughts from a F100 (film) users point of view of the D70. I got to use it for about 3 hours on Christmas day because my cousin has one and when we went I went to visit we basically swapped cameras; he took my F100 and I got the D70. Remember this is just for fun, so please, no one get offended by anything I say ;) .

Well my first impressions were that it was a heck of a lot lighter, but everyone already knew that since the F100's is a pro metal body and the D70's plastic. It did seem well built though, just not as well as the F100. Although if I did own it I would be careful what weather I used it in and how I handled it.

The AF was alot slower than what I'm used to with the F100 and AF-S lens but that's probobly not the camera but the cheap Sigma lens he had on there :rolleyes: . I'll get to the AF point layout later. It also seemed that the D70 was just a little bit less responsive than my F100. Maybe if I spent more time using it I wouldn't feel the same.

I loved the instant feedback on the LCD of the shots I was taking. That's a big advantage of digital vs. film right there which I could definitely get used to. Not having to develop film is going to be a HUGE plus once I get a dSLR. Not feeling like I was "wasting" film was a great feeling also. But one thing I like about film is that it makes you stop and think about the shot before you take it instead of slacking off and fixing your shots later in PP. But by starting off with fim I think I've taught myself how to approach taking a photo and can carry that on in digital.

There were really only 2 big negatives in my experience with the D70. The first was the viewfinder. To be frank; it was awful compared to what I'm used to :mad: . It was small, dark and not very clear. I was never actually sure I had focused correctly because it was so dark and unclear. I really don't know how everyone with cropped-sensor cameras live with that VF. Maybe coming from an F100 I'm expecting too much but when I do get a dSLR it will have a good VF or its not coming home with me;) . The second problem I had with the D70 was the arrangement of the focus points. They were were very big and covered the entire frame, not like my F100 where they are in the middle of the VF and are pretty area-specific. How you get very precise focus with that AF system I don't know.

These were really my only big complaints with the D70, and overall it was a very fun experience. I think one of the reasons I'm so intrigued with the D200 is that it is said to have a very good VF and AF system, so maybe in a few years when the price drops it'll be mine :D . But until then the F100 serves me well.

I hope you all enjoyed my rant. I just thought it'd be cool to share my point of view as a film user of this venerable dSLR.

Andrew S.

D70FAN
01-08-2006, 08:56 AM
Hey everyone,

I really have nothing to do right now so I thought I'd give you all my thoughts from a F100 (film) users point of view of the D70. I got to use it for about 3 hours on Christmas day because my cousin has one and when we went I went to visit we basically swapped cameras; he took my F100 and I got the D70. Remember this is just for fun, so please, no one get offended by anything I say ;) .

Well my first impressions were that it was a heck of a lot lighter, but everyone already knew that since the F100's is a pro metal body and the D70's plastic. It did seem well built though, just not as well as the F100. Although if I did own it I would be careful what weather I used it in and how I handled it.

The AF was alot slower than what I'm used to with the F100 and AF-S lens but that's probobly not the camera but the cheap Sigma lens he had on there :rolleyes: . I'll get to the AF point layout later. It also seemed that the D70 was just a little bit less responsive than my F100. Maybe if I spent more time using it I wouldn't feel the same.

I loved the instant feedback on the LCD of the shots I was taking. That's a big advantage of digital vs. film right there which I could definitely get used to. Not having to develop film is going to be a HUGE plus once I get a dSLR. Not feeling like I was "wasting" film was a great feeling also. But one thing I like about film is that it makes you stop and think about the shot before you take it instead of slacking off and fixing your shots later in PP. But by starting off with fim I think I've taught myself how to approach taking a photo and can carry that on in digital.

There were really only 2 big negatives in my experience with the D70. The first was the viewfinder. To be frank; it was awful compared to what I'm used to :mad: . It was small, dark and not very clear. I was never actually sure I had focused correctly because it was so dark and unclear. I really don't know how everyone with cropped-sensor cameras live with that VF. Maybe coming from an F100 I'm expecting too much but when I do get a dSLR it will have a good VF or its not coming home with me;) . The second problem I had with the D70 was the arrangement of the focus points. They were were very big and covered the entire frame, not like my F100 where they are in the middle of the VF and are pretty area-specific. How you get very precise focus with that AF system I don't know.

These were really my only big complaints with the D70, and overall it was a very fun experience. I think one of the reasons I'm so intrigued with the D200 is that it is said to have a very good VF and AF system, so maybe in a few years when the price drops it'll be mine :D . But until then the F100 serves me well.

I hope you all enjoyed my rant. I just thought it'd be cool to share my point of view as a film user of this venerable dSLR.

Andrew S.

Some valid points in there concerning film vs. dSLR. Using a better lens helps the VF, and making sure that the diaopter setting is correct helps a lot as well. Focus is a matter of what the eye sees vs. a split image. you get used to it after a couple of hundred shots.

I'm not sure that I understand the focus point complaint, other than to say that they are individually selectable, and are placed in a diamond pattern to cover the 4 main off-center focus points and the center. You can change that to center only as well (but I wouldn't).

Had you been using an AF-S lens I'm sure that the AF speed would have been equal to the F100.;)

sherlock
01-08-2006, 01:02 PM
Hey George,

Maybe I'm just used to the large VF. With the AF points I think it was just that they seemed very large, like AF 'areas' instead of AF 'points'. I guess I'm just used to the smaller AF points. It was really a great camera to use overall, now I know why you rave about yours :D .

Andrew

thesween
01-08-2006, 04:29 PM
Well, I also hope no one gets offended, but the trade-off with the F100 vs. D70 is a no-brainer for me - I'll take digital. I have a N90s and a N70, neither of which I have used in better than two years, other than to fire the shutters repeatedly so they don't freeze. Quite frankly, I used to drool over the F100, but am now happy I never did buy one. I could list all of my cameras, both 35mm and 6x6, but all that matters is this; digital gives me what I want and need HERE AND NOW, without film processing. I can bracket and get "thee shot" and know immediately that I have, no need to wait and travel and return to pick up prints. Sorry, but in the words of a pro print photog friend of mine when asked what to do with my film fear, "Sell as fast you can, take the money and run, film is not going to survive." Personally, I believe that film is indeed doomed.

This will sound harsh, but I am convinced that those who stubbornly cling to film will soon find themselves in the predicament of not being able to find that film easily. It's already to the point where I cannot find 6x6 roll film locally, and locating, say, a roll of Velvia would likewise be all but impossible. Oddly enough, I do have several rolls of Velvia sitting in the fridge and don't much see me ever using them.

There is an old saying, "There is no stopping an idea whose time has come." To me, digital's time has come, film's time has gone. And for anyone who might care, I am 55 years old and have been a serious amateur photog since the early '70s, my opinions and observations, while certainly not infallible, are based on a lot of years behind the lens. Cheers!

erichlund
01-08-2006, 09:02 PM
I agree with you opinion of the D70 viewfinder. I never felt comfortable trying to manually focus with it. The D200 viewfinder is much better, though it cannot be as large and bright as a full frame viewfinder. Still, I have not problem focusing on a reasonable contrast subject on the matte viewfinder.

Cheers,
Eric