PDA

View Full Version : Purchasing a D50 what do I need to start?



mike62
12-09-2005, 10:13 AM
I am upgrading from my point and shoot mainly to be able to take pictures of my daughter playing basketball and apparently a dSLR is my best bet and the D50 overall. As you know gyms have poor lighting and players probably prefer I don't use a flash. All my other pictures will be family, vacation, outdoors, etc. With that said what essential two lenses do I need (hopefully one will have zoom ability) to get started and what filters? Until I can take the classes offered by the camera shop what would be a good setting to shoot basketball pics at indoors?

Thanks for any suggestions. And BTW, cost is a major issue.

Rambler358
12-09-2005, 11:47 AM
I wouldn't worry about filters for right now. You may want to consider getting one lens for the moment. Nikon's new 18-200 zoom would be a very nice lens, but its price may be a factor. But that lens could very well replace 2 or 3 other lenses.

GrimJeeper
12-09-2005, 12:09 PM
If cost is an issue, you won't like what I'm going to say. To shoot basketball indoors with no flash, you'll need a fast lens and a monopod unless you want to double your investment with an image stabilized lens. The Nikon 80-200 mm f/2.8 is a good lens for this purpose, but it's also pricey at $850 without image stabilization. Good news is that there is a $100 rebate on the lens. And you'll definitely want to get a clear lens filter to screw on the end of it to protect your investment. That'll be another $50 - $75 for a 77 mm filter. Plus the monopod at about $50. If cost is an issue, then I'd go with the kit lens for now for your family photos rather than the $700 18-200 VRII lens suggested in the previous post since it's not suitable for shooting basketball indoors and instead sink your moeny into the 80-200 f/2.8 lens for basketball. You'll be sorely disappointed with the 55-200 mm slow lens that is offered in some of the packages with the D50 if you try to use it for basketball. I returned mine and bought the lens I described above. I shoot figure skating and gymnastics indoors with no flash. The low lighting and inability to use flash makes for an inescapably expensive problem.

coldrain
12-09-2005, 12:10 PM
The Nikon Nikkor AF 180mm f/2.8D ED-IF may be a nice idea too, it is much faster (more light sensitive) than that Nikkor 18-200mm VR and about half its price. And it is a much better lens, a really good prime. Get the 18-55 kit lens or the 18-70 kit lens of the Nikon D70s with it and you will have a very nice combination of snap shot camera with a fast indoor sports lens.

erichlund
12-09-2005, 01:37 PM
If cost is an issue, you won't like what I'm going to say. To shoot basketball indoors with no flash, you'll need a fast lens and a monopod unless you want to double your investment with an image stabilized lens.
Image stabilization will not help you with moving subjects. It allows you to hand hold slow shutter speeds, but moving b-ball players will be blurred by motion (however, the court will be nice and sharp :p ). The 2.8 lenses may not be fast enough for indoor sports, which is why many people like the 85mm lenses for this (either the 1.8 or even the 1.4). There are 105mm and 135mm f2 lenses that might work as well. A good option that George often points out would be to rent these lenses until you find one that works well for your chosen environment. For low light action, speed is everything.

I should mention, the VR can be useful for one particular shot. If you are trying to isolate one player and blur the others, then using the panning mode on a player moving against the grain (so to speak) can result in getting that player sharp while the others are out of focus. Of course, people being what they are, some parts will be blurred as those parts move in different directions from the pan direction. And, forget it if the player can't run without bouncing.

Cheers,
Eric

caveman017
12-09-2005, 04:00 PM
Try to get the Nikkor 50mm F1.8 Its only $100 and its worth it

GrimJeeper
12-09-2005, 07:21 PM
[QUOTE=erichlund]Image stabilization will not help you with moving subjects.

Right, just meant the comment about the monopod...no monopod then you need the IS version of the fast lens, not that IS will help with the moving subjects. Apologies for being unclear on that. Agree completely.

ktixx
12-09-2005, 08:23 PM
For shooting in-doors you will need a fast lense, something f/2.8 or below. If you will be able to get close to the action I would suggest the Sigma 24-70 f/2.8 (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=350972&is=REG&addedTroughType=search) - $399.99 from B&H. That lense does not have very much on the wide side (36mm) and not much on the long side (95mm) but it is fast and overall a good walk around lense. If you think you will be in the stands, and you won't be able to get close to the action maybe the Tokina 80-200 f/2.8 (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=101947&is=USA&addedTroughType=search) - $610.00 from B&H. I have no idea how the tokina performs, but if you are on a tight budget that lense is cheap for the speed and zoom.
For settings - High ISO, I would suggest Shutter speeds no less than 1/250 but overall it will be trial and error to see how fast of a shutter you will need to freeze the action. Definitely use a monopod, as this will stabilize you, and will reduce the shutter speed you will need to get clear shots. In addition, I would shoot in raw, or make sure you do a custom white balance, as those Gym lights can be tricky to photograph under.
Good Luck
Ken

ktixx
12-09-2005, 08:29 PM
Try to get the Nikkor 50mm F1.8 Its only $100 and its worth it
Sure 50 f/1.8's are great lenses, I have a canon version for my 20D and I have never regretted getting it, however if he is on a budget, and has a specific purpose for purchasing the camera, I would suggest using the $100 on a better zoom lense, and saving the 50 f/1.8 for a future purchase.
Just JMO
Ken