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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1
    I've been getting by with slave flashes, but it's really a bad compromise for candid photography unless you do it right. I've resisted upgrading from my Canon S60 because I haven't found an affordable camera with external flash provision and aligned tripod socket (I often use a monopod). Since not one of the compact cameras I've seen has both these features, I have to use a modified external flash bracket with and without a variety of slave flashes to overcome these inadequacies. I can still carry almost everything in my jacket pockets, but having a hot shoe and proper tripod mount make it much easier.

    I can live without a hot shoe, but it seems like modern camera designers have never actually used a compact camera for serious photography- they consistently put the tripod socket in the wrong place. I think that it's ludicrous that they haven't thought of going back to the best of the 1970's era 35mm compact rangefinder designs for basic ergonomics of a compact camera.

    Instead they have copied the packaging of the 1990's disposable cameras- small and light, then loaded them up with image stabilization and facial recognition that don't come close to the intrinsic mass stability of a 14 oz camera nor the visual ability of a 5 week old baby.

    Why don't they separate the idiot-proof elphin camera philosophy from the advanced compact design, instead of taking the former and simply enlarging it and adding more and more automatic features that an advanced photographer doesn't really need??

    I can see the difficulty in adding a hot shoe to one of the newer, mostly plastic, camera designs, but adding a PC connector and a buffer circuit should be a tiny cost addition to an advanced compact camera. Aligning the tripod mount with the lens axis should be a no cost change. Designing advanced compact cameras on the assumption that they can be held and operated well using only the right hand isn't very smart of the designers (perhaps if engineers were involved if would be better?) . Positioning the lens far enough away from the left end of the camera so a right-handed person can hold it steady in the left hand while operating the controls with the right, without interfering with the flash or lens should be common sense in a $200+ "compact" camera, but apparently not.
    Last edited by ps.dig; 09-30-2010 at 04:28 PM.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    So Calif
    Posts
    3,226
    Just get a 5-dollar bracket and flash that can be triggered/slaved by the pop-up, and away you go. The only trick is the off camera flash has to "see" the pop-up flash.
    Pentax K20D/K5/15/21/40/70/10-17/12-24, Sigma 17-70 2.8-4.5/150-500, Tamron 90 Macro/70-200 2.8, Canon SX20 IS/Elph 500HS
    (formerly Pentax 50 1.4/50-200/55-300/K100D, Sigma 18-50 2.8/70-300 APO, Tamron 28-75, Viv 800, Tele-Tokina 800, Canon S3 IS, Samsung L210)
    http://s133.photobucket.com/albums/q78/KylePix/

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    295
    You have to have a camera that can use it's pop up flash as a commander mode. My D5000 doesn't have it.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Brisbane, CA
    Posts
    3,591
    Quote Originally Posted by Myboostedgst View Post
    You have to have a camera that can use it's pop up flash as a commander mode. My D5000 doesn't have it.
    What does commander mode do exactly? I was under the impression it just made a small flash that doesn't impact the exposure to set off the other flashes. Can't you just turn your flash power down a couple stops and get something similar?
    Lukas

    Camera: Anonymous
    I could tell you but I wouldn't want you to get all pissy if it's the wrong brand

    Flickr

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    So Calif
    Posts
    3,226
    Serious cameras should have hotshoes at the very least.
    Actually, not really. High-end studio users would likely use multiple strobe heads or softboxes with a dedicated power source, and "serious" wedding or portrait shooters would at least be using a handle-mounted system.

    Hotshoe flashes are only for convenience.
    Pentax K20D/K5/15/21/40/70/10-17/12-24, Sigma 17-70 2.8-4.5/150-500, Tamron 90 Macro/70-200 2.8, Canon SX20 IS/Elph 500HS
    (formerly Pentax 50 1.4/50-200/55-300/K100D, Sigma 18-50 2.8/70-300 APO, Tamron 28-75, Viv 800, Tele-Tokina 800, Canon S3 IS, Samsung L210)
    http://s133.photobucket.com/albums/q78/KylePix/

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