Home News Buyers Guide About Advertising
 
 
 
   
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 25
  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA, USA
    Posts
    161
    Serious cameras should have hotshoes at the very least. I'm not sure an ultra-zoom should have one, if only because it would require a dedicated flash that knows about the zoom setting.
    A manual-focus slide shooter lost in the world of digicams.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    76
    It is an extra expense to buy an external flash, but if you are actually going to buy an external flash and use it then a hot shoe is great. Personally I don't like carrying big bulky cameras in most indoor enviroments (public at least) and will sacrifice picture quality for a compact size. The external flash will add quite a bit of bulk to you camera.
    Canon S2 IS, Canon A510

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    3
    I know this is a digital camera resource site but I was actually looking for a cheap digital camera with a hotshoe to test film camera setups. I would actually be using studio flash for film portraits with Nikon/Mamiya gear.
    The digital would just be used to test the lighting set-up really. ( In the old days you would use polaroids to do this. )
    I cant seem to find many low-end models with a hotshoe, though. Fuji MX 2900? Anyone know of any others?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kapellen, Antwerp, Belgium
    Posts
    345
    Quote Originally Posted by Waz View Post
    I know this is a digital camera resource site but I was actually looking for a cheap digital camera with a hotshoe to test film camera setups. I would actually be using studio flash for film portraits with Nikon/Mamiya gear.
    The digital would just be used to test the lighting set-up really. ( In the old days you would use polaroids to do this. )
    I cant seem to find many low-end models with a hotshoe, though. Fuji MX 2900? Anyone know of any others?
    I don't know a low-end model that has a hot shoe on it and basicaly I won't suggest one if it would exist. Low-end models don't have manual controls and I guess that's what you need to be able to set when you want to test your lights. Another option is getting a camera with full manual controls and use a flash trigger to have an external flash fired.

    Retired: Fuji A205S
    Current: Fuji F6500FD

    My album -> http://wutske.deviantart.com/
    My blog -> http://my.opera.com/wutske

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    4,428
    How cheap is 'CHEAP'?
    You maybe able to find discontinued FZ20, FZ30 which has a hotshoe that may suit your need. There are plenty on Ebay.
    All new digital cams with hotshoe are more like higher-end models like Wutske already said.
    Nikon D90, D80
    Nikkor 16-85mm AF-S DX F/3.5-5.6G ED VR, Tamron SP AF 28-75mm F/2.8 XR Di LD Aspherical (IF) macro, Nikkor 50mm F/1.4D, Nikkor 50mm F/1.8D, Nikkor AF-S VR 70-300mm F/4.5-5.6G IF-ED, Sigma 105mm F/2.8 EX DG Macro ||| 2x SB800 | SB600 ||| Manfrotto 190XB

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    3
    Thanks for the quick advice, Wutse/Tim. I managed to do what I wanted on a 20 quid Fuji digital. You can set the aperture to F4 or F8 on this camera to preview the shot. Image quality wasnt really important because the final shot would be on film anyway ( yes, I can hear you tittering!). I would be using two off-camera strobes and a backlight, which was why I needed the hotshoe digital to test the lighting setup.

    A nice article on studio flash techiniques is here. You will all want a hotshoe/PC after reading this!

    http://www.ephotozine.com/article/St...dvice---Part-3

    Thanks again.
    Waz

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Mattoon, IL USA
    Posts
    143

    Like hair....

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayde View Post
    Like hair, its nice to have the option !!!
    What is so great about hair? I can't remember!
    Respectfully,

    Mike Sneddon
    Mattoon, IL USA

    Canon SD1000, S3, 20D & 5D; Panasonic LX2. Canon lenses: 50mm f1.4, 16-35mm f2.8, 28-70mm f2.8 and 70-200mm f2.8 IS Also have two film cameras: Canon Elan 7E and a Yashica TL Super (which I purchased in Vietnam in 1969 for $106).

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    268
    I couldn't live without either a hotshoe or sync connector. On-camera flash has only one purpose, which is convenience. It's a good way to get mediocre photos. The attached photo has an external flash to the left, firing through a translucent diffuser. (If the chipmunk looks guilty, it's because he just swiped all the peanuts I put out for the birds. )

    Regards,
    Bill
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    3
    Yep, Bill. You would definitely have lost texture in the bark and the fur if you had used on-camera flash on that shot. The odd thing is that we (old farts) were always taught that on-camera flash was a sin - you will almost always get red-eye. But most builtin camera flash units are placed exactly where you dont want them - bang on top of the lens! If you could at least twist the flash then you could bounce it off a wall but many just seem to be the pop-up-flash variety.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Taipei, Taiwan/from Canada
    Posts
    1,313
    Pop up flashes work for a quick fill flash where nothing too strong is needed, but I wouldn't trust an on camera flash for anything other than that.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •