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Thread: Differences

  1. #1
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    Differences

    I've looked into the reviews of all the dSLRs and read people's opinions of all their dSLRs, listened to the problems and the benefits of all of them and have come to one inescapable conclusion - there just isn't a "best" dSLR. It seems to me that unlike SLRs where quality depends entirely upon the film and lens - the actual SLR taking very much of a backseat - there's a lot more involved with dSLRs.

    The good points seem to be:
    Olympus - anti-dust sensor
    Minolta - anti-shake sensor
    Nikon - Possible to use a manual, mechanical backup camera on the same lenses
    Canon - low power-consumption
    Fuji - AA batteries
    Pentax - AA batteries


    Aside from that, there seems little difference. All have photo quality that has been described as too soft. I know it can be sharpened and tweaked by fiddle-faddling with RAW format files but that's hardly what the end user (IE me) would ever wish to do. Thus, I'm looking purely at JPEG output.

  2. #2
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    Not sure about the others but on Nikons and Canons you can alter the level of sharpness applied in-camera to the jpg file.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhys
    I've looked into the reviews of all the dSLRs and read people's opinions of all their dSLRs, listened to the problems and the benefits of all of them and have come to one inescapable conclusion - there just isn't a "best" dSLR. It seems to me that unlike SLRs where quality depends entirely upon the film and lens - the actual SLR taking very much of a backseat - there's a lot more involved with dSLRs.

    The good points seem to be:
    Olympus - anti-dust sensor
    Minolta - anti-shake sensor
    Nikon - Possible to use a manual, mechanical backup camera on the same lenses
    Canon - low power-consumption
    Fuji - AA batteries
    Pentax - AA batteries


    Aside from that, there seems little difference. All have photo quality that has been described as too soft. I know it can be sharpened and tweaked by fiddle-faddling with RAW format files but that's hardly what the end user (IE me) would ever wish to do. Thus, I'm looking purely at JPEG output.
    I am compelled to disagree with your assessment. There is, in my opinion (and I stress in my opinion so that the attack dogs don't get all in a tizzy), a best dSLR that is affordable by mere mortals...the Canon 20D* (in my opinion).

    I think if you asked people (including some fans of other brands) they would tend to agree. This is also merely my opinion.

    *Disclaimer:
    The opinions stated, as they appear in this post, are solely the opinions of the respondent and are not to be construed as categorical statements or as anything other than opinions as defined by Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Tenth Edition which specifically defines an opinion as: A view, judgment or appraisal formed in the mind about a particular matter. These opinions are subject to change without prior notification, and, in which case, the respondent shall be held harmless in all matters relating to and resulting from the opinions, the changing of the opinions and all other opinions that may result as a consequence of a change in opinions or the holding of the original opinions, whichever may come first, in perpetuity.
    Last edited by JTL; 05-05-2005 at 01:22 PM.

  4. #4
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    The "best" is what suits you.

    On paper (and as some here will say, in reality) the EOS 350D is better than the Nikon D70, but I tried holding them and the Nikon felt better to me. Since I will be spending quite a bit of time holding my new toy that was important to me. Others will value weight, picture quality, features etc. There's feck all difference between them, but minor differences can be important. Every dSLR will be very good, each with its' own minor peculiarities.

    I disagree that there is no best dSLR. There is - but the best for me is not necessarily the best for you.

    Ultimately a camera is a tool. Use the one that suits your need best and has the features you want.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    not there yet

    I think what I've read so far about all the fine DSLRs out there so far has taught me that we're not there yet in terms of price and performance. I could slight all of those cameras for being less than full frame, for example, unless we're including the three of four full-frame cameras that are out of an ordinary mortal's reach.

    No man steps in the same river twice. We could play the waiting game forever (always with a weather eye on the horizon for the next big thingz) or we can close our eyes, take a breath, and buy something.

    I do agree with my comrade above who said, "The best is what works for you", with all the subtleties that that entails.

    yours,

    Julian


    ---------------------------------------------------------
    Amateur Photographer
    Nikon D70s
    Nikkor 50mm f/1.8
    Nikkor 18-70mm f/3.5
    Canon PowerShot G2


    I need new ways to interpret things. Photography gives me new interpretations.

  6. #6
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    20D for those who require the most, for the least.
    New they can be had for $1240 with the rebate.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by JTL
    *Disclaimer:
    The opinions stated, as they appear in this post, are solely the opinions of the respondent and are not to be construed as categorical statements or as anything other than opinions as defined by Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Tenth Edition which specifically defines an opinion as: A view, judgment or appraisal formed in the mind about a particular matter. These opinions are subject to change without prior notification, and, in which case, the respondent shall be held harmless in all matters relating to and resulting from the opinions, the changing of the opinions and all other opinions that may result as a consequence of a change in opinions or the holding of the original opinions, whichever may come first, in perpetuity.
    LOL @ JTL

    I agree with j26 when he says "The best is what suits you"

    Side note: You can't dismiss the canon XT and 20D's high ISO performance.
    Nikon D90 | Sigma 10-20 HSM | DX 18-105 f3.5-5.6 VR | DX 55-200 VR | 35 f/2.0 D | 50 f/1.4 D | 85mm F/1.8 D | SB-800 x 3 | SU-800
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    Flickr | Twitter

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by j26
    The "best" is what suits you.

    I disagree that there is no best dSLR. There is - but the best for me is not necessarily the best for you.

    Ultimately a camera is a tool. Use the one that suits your need best and has the features you want.
    No disclaimer like JTL and I agree with j26. This is just my experience and opinion. I held onto my old Canon ae1p film as long as I could. I looked and thought about countless digi's over the last 3-4 years. I never could get "the one" that felt right and met my needs. Lord knows I came very close to buying one several times, but held out. Last October hooked me when I saw the Canon 20D. I had read the reviews and pre hype, but once I picked it up, it wasn't leaving my hand. I love it and it fits my use well. It may not fit yours, that is a decision we all have to make. Thank goodness for sites like this and others where you can get info, although sometimes too much info can confuse. I'm having that with a lens choice If it will do what you want and it feels good in your hands, then get it and don't look back!

    Dennis

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by aparmley
    LOL @ JTL
    I am glad you liked it. This is how amuse myself instead of working.
    Quote Originally Posted by aparmley
    I agree with j26 when he says "The best is what suits you"
    I gotta tell you, this "what suits you" stuff is starting to stick in my craw. We've been brow-beaten into being afraid to state our opinions and preferences. If someone said "Gee, I'm thinking about buying a used Ford Pinto", would you say "whatever suits you..." ? No! You'd say "Whadda'ya nuts?" Some things ARE better than others. And if we've come to feel that way...we should be honest about it...and not hide behind the politically correct answers.* Ah...I guess I'm just cranky today and looking for a fight...



    *Disclaimer:

    The respondent is not endorsing any particular political viewpoint nor is the respondent implying that a particular political orientation is preferable, insofar as such orientation may be construed to have meaning beyond any and all points that may or may not be qualified in the response. Furthermore, all rights and warrants associated with the holding of a particular political viewpoint by the respondent in relation to the response in question shall be deemed forthwith to have no meaning whatsoever beyond its original intent, the definition of which is at the sole discretion of the respondent and may change without prior notice.

  10. #10
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    My problem is that I look at the advantages of each of the dSLRs and want all the advantages and none of the disadvantages.

    I'd like a dSLR with a 4:3 format, anti-dust sensor, anti-shake sensor, AA batteries, low power consumption and which also allows a manual, mechanical film-powered backup camera to be used with the same lenses.

    Interestingly, that counts out all the current dSLRs. Notice I've said nothing about image quality/size or functionality yet.

    In terms of image quality/size, I want something that'll give me a fantastic double-elephant folio-sized print (29 x 41 inches) as I figure that's the maximum size anybody will ever want in terms of printsize. In terms of megapixels at 150dpi, this would be 4350 x 6150 or 26.75 megapixels. The highest size I've thus far seen has been a Mamiya at 22 megapixels - which comes close enough to make little difference.

    As far as functionality is concerned, I want to be able to focus by twisting the lens barrel or by using a camera-mounted servo. I don't want lenses with built-in electronic junk. Rather than having possibilities for electrical failure spread throughout the system, I want it all in one place so that I have to replace just one unit rather than several or being left wondering whether the lens is at fault or the camera. I also want quick, accurate focussing. IR laser beams would seem to be ideal in this instance yet few manufacturers seem to employ them. I want to have accurate focus checking in the viewfinder for occasions when I must focus manually. I want to be able to use flashes of all ages and styles, not just funky new electronic all-singing-all-dancing flashes that never quite perform as advertised.

    Do I want my cake and eat it? Yes - most certainly since it'd be my money paying for a dSLR and I want to make darned sure that I get at least twice the milage for my money and have a camera that will last at least 20 years without repairs.

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