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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Derbyshire, UK
    Posts
    2,505
    Sarah fantastic fireworks shot what settings did you use to capture such sharp detail? On the point of concert shots with an FZ20 I have just tried doing the same myself & yes as you said it was obviously pushing the noise boundaries & only worked reasonably at relatively still moments, although I did inadvertantly get some interesting blurred motion on a few images. Shame I can't claim it was by design

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,099
    Hi Sarah,

    Those are fantastic firework shots! Excellent stuff.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    96

    Fireworks

    First let me say THANKYOU for this guide

    I will be at Walt Disney World on the 4th of July this year I just purchased a Canon S3 IS, will this do for fireworks and night shots? Doesn't the flash help on night shots up to like 10ft away? For fireworks no flash correct (it sounds dumb to me, i just wanna make sure)

    Thanks in advance
    Just getting started and having fun

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/franko515/

    Canon S3 IS (May 16th '06)
    Canon 30D (Feb. '07)

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    6
    Does anyone have any good tips for me in regard to photographing seascapes, ie. time of day (I assume early morning, early evening?).
    Should the horizon be high or low or does in matter?
    Anything else I should be paying attention to?
    I'll be using a Canon Rebel XT.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Newton ,Massachusetts
    Posts
    500
    Quote Originally Posted by lyre_byrd
    Should the horizon be high or low or does in matter?
    Anything else I should be paying attention to?
    I'll be using a Canon Rebel XT.
    A good rule of composition is to place the horizon about 1/3 of the way down from the top or 1/3 of the way up from the bottom. If you want to emphasize the sky, use the latter.
    Panasonic FZ20, Kodak DC4800, Canon SD850 for when I don't want to carry a camera
    http://JLVACCARO.4T.COM

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kapellen, Antwerp, Belgium
    Posts
    345
    Quote Originally Posted by JLV
    A good rule of composition is to place the horizon about 1/3 of the way down from the top or 1/3 of the way up from the bottom. If you want to emphasize the sky, use the latter.
    I'm not shure if the Rebel XT does, but some camera's can draw a small grid on the screen that helps you allign the horizon, or helps getting the subject in the center of the photo.

    Retired: Fuji A205S
    Current: Fuji F6500FD

    My album -> http://wutske.deviantart.com/
    My blog -> http://my.opera.com/wutske

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    6
    Thank you all so much for your thoughts and tips.

    Regarding the light: This morning I went out about 5.30 for about 10 minutes to experiment, and I guess it was a tad early; there was not sufficient light (I try not to use a flash), because the camera had a hard time focusing and therefore the shutter would not depress. With perseverance, I did manage to get a few good shots, though.

    I only shoot in automatic mode because I am a novice, but had I shot in manual mode, would setting the ISO to a higher number have helped me? What else could I have done with the settings to bring in more light. Would a tripod have helped?

    Also, is there a rule of thumb that would indicate the best morning time for light. How close to 'sunrise' for instance?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Newton ,Massachusetts
    Posts
    500
    Quote Originally Posted by lyre_byrd

    Also, is there a rule of thumb that would indicate the best morning time for light. How close to 'sunrise' for instance?
    Time of day is really relative to what you want to achieve. Any time of day may be good. When there is not much light, you need to compensate by using a larger lens opening (lower number) or a slower shutter speed or a higher ISO, or a combination of any or all. You will need to experiment to see what you like. If you are using a slower shutter speed a tripod is helpful. By the way, unless you wish to illuminate something in the foreground, the flash will not help.
    Panasonic FZ20, Kodak DC4800, Canon SD850 for when I don't want to carry a camera
    http://JLVACCARO.4T.COM

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    61
    awsome articles......thanks alot gary
    Canon Digital Rebel XTi w/EF-S 18-55 & EF 75-300 III USM

    Panasonic DMC-FZ20

    CHECK OUT MY GALLERIES
    http://www.bryanbendo.com/gallery

    http://flickr.com/photos/bryanbendo

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,099
    Hi thanks for the feedback. I am planning to put in more tips here... just need to get some time on my hands.

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