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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    5

    Photoshop necessary for newbie?

    While I recognize that Photoshop completes (or enhances) the entire SLR package and experience, is it really a necessity when starting out or can I invest in that further down the road? I've been saving and saving and finally have enough for a digital slr but am wondering if I should wait and also save for Photoshop. I believe there is going to be a learning curve for me in the new camera so I'm a bit intimidated at the thought of also having to learn Photoshop. I currently have a Canon PowerShot.

    I should mention that I am wanting to use the camera to take pictures of my children, lovely Colorado scenery, and interesting images for my blog so I don't expect to be doing a ton of manipulating to begin. Many thanks ahead of time for your responses. I'm learning so much for you all!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Georgetown, KY
    Posts
    1,627
    IMO you don't need the full version of PS, just get PS Elements and it should do all you need at quite a savings.
    Dennis

    Canon 5D
    Canon 20D


    Georgetown, KY Photographer
    Retouching

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Brisbane, CA
    Posts
    3,591
    I find PS Elements to be good enough most of the time. Most cameras come with some sort of editing software too. Some are better than others though. It's covered in the reviews on this site. That might be sufficient to start.
    Lukas

    Camera: Anonymous
    I could tell you but I wouldn't want you to get all pissy if it's the wrong brand

    Flickr

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    814

    To PS or not?

    Even PS Elements may be a steep learning curve for a beginner?

    Maybe something like Picasa which is a free download from Google would be a better way to get a feel for post-processing. Then, later on, you can better decide which post-processing software will suit you, as there's several other excellent products available apart from PhotoShop.

    If you'd like to check out a bit about how PS Elements work, you might like to check out the tutorials HERE.

    Cheers

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kerala,India
    Posts
    334
    Agree with Beowulff....i live with picasa and photofilter...both are easy to learn.
    Nikon D40,
    Nikon TC 200
    Vivitar 28-80 AIS
    Nikon Micro 55mm AI 1977,
    Nikon 50mm f/1.8 E AIS 1979,
    Nikon 300mm f/4 ED IF AIS 1982.....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    95
    Get your slr and start shooting.
    Olympus E-410
    Queens, New York
    U.S.A

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    530
    I agree with the post above. Get your camera and start shooting. You might try saving copies of your original pictures and only edit copies of the original. Years down the road you can always go back to that original file and edit with whatever software you are comfortable with at that time.
    Spook
    Canon EOS 50D,7D and some lens and equipment.
    Fuji F200 Exr

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    5
    I also would recommend Picasa for beginners! It's free and it rocks! Most of the common modification requirements of a new photographer can be easily done using Picasa..
    Photo-Print-Reviews.com - A Guide To Online Photo Printing & Sharing Services!

    300 Free Prints | Photo Coupons | Compare Photo Services

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