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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    7

    Question LCD Problems with SD500?

    I was going to buy the SD300, but so many reports of easily cracked LCDs gave me hesitation. Does anyone know if this issue has been resolved with the new SD400 and SD500 models, or do you think this will be a problem for all the 2" LCD Elphs? I don't really need more than 4 MPs, but if the durability is inferior on the SD300 batch, I'd be willing to splurge on the higher MP models (since it will cost $170 to have a broken LCD fixed by Canon anyway)...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    296
    Quote Originally Posted by JRoster
    I was going to buy the SD300, but so many reports of easily cracked LCDs gave me hesitation. Does anyone know if this issue has been resolved with the new SD400 and SD500 models, or do you think this will be a problem for all the 2" LCD Elphs? I don't really need more than 4 MPs, but if the durability is inferior on the SD300 batch, I'd be willing to splurge on the higher MP models (since it will cost $170 to have a broken LCD fixed by Canon anyway)...
    No problems for the SD500 so far. The SD400 isn't in stores till April so no info on that.
    Where is the 8 MP Elph?
    Unofficial Canon discussion site

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    7
    Thanks for your reply - I trust this forum will keep posted if problems develop...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4

    Question SD500 LCD replacement

    I bought a cannon sd-500 for my 17 year old son. LCD broke after three days. I ordered a new LCD from cannon for about forty dollars w/shipping.
    I'm having problems getting the two part camera case to come apart.
    Does anyone know if there is some secret latch or something that is holding the two halves together at the top of the camera?
    I have taken out six screws and the two side panels. The bottom comes apart but not along the top. I don't want to force it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    52
    How can this happen after 3 days ? Did your son drop the cam ? I havenīt had any problems yet, not one scratch, far away from breaking.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4

    Exclamation

    I think he had the camera in his pocket. Nontheless, there was a bit of drama for a while. I have successfully replaced the LCD. It was a bit tricky once the halves decided to let go. The camera works fine...went to Best Buy last night and traded up to the Rebel XT. A lot of money, but at least the LCD seems more protected. Trust me, you had better be extremely careful with your sd500 because there is no protection for the LCD!! Good luck.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    296
    Well, there are lots of 3rd party LCD protectors
    Where is the 8 MP Elph?
    Unofficial Canon discussion site

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    18
    I asked Canon if they stood behind their LCDs on this series - the techie on the phone indicated that A) this isn't a real problem and B) people who say it is a problem have abused their cameras by carrying them in a purse or PANTS pocket instead of SHIRT pocket, or leaving them in a cold car overnight. I did not think this was a very satisfactory answer. The camera shop here AND Best Buy said they do not cover anything with an extended warranty that Canon will not cover.

    I think it is a crap shoot. Lots of people have great luck with the SD series and then there are the unlucky ones. One guy takes his skiing all the time, no problem.

    I'm back looking at the Casio Exilim, but I'm afraid I'd like the Canon picture quality more..

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4
    I'm not slamming the camera, and it's obvious I don't work for Canon. If I did, I would include a big caution about the sensitive LCD and stick it right on the camera...perhaps it's there but we missed it...and then again, that might be admitting a flaw in their (SONY'S) product. I'm sure that with meticulus care, one could get a useful & long life out of the LCD. Yeah, I suppose we were one of the unlucky ones. But I guess everyone can't be skiing. It just seems that for that size of camera, i.e. small and portable, there should be a better protected LCD right from the factory. We bought it for quality and convenience. I agree, common sense should prevail. At least my 17 year old gets good grades. Good luck all, I'll be with the digital SLR folks.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4
    This was in response to questions from another reader who just broke their LCD on their SD500. Maybe someone else is looking for answers.

    Sorry to here about your sad moment. Don't despair. For less than $50 you can do the replacement yourself. I have never repaired a camera before and was a bit nervous...but I did it. It took about three hours...mostly spent pondering each step...but NOW I could probably replace the LCD in about thirty to forty-five minutes. Of course, I only needed to do it once!

    I called the number that was listed for Canon USA and asked for the parts department. Service was great. I told them I needed an LCD screen for a SD500. Cost was approx. $45 which included the $5 shipping. Paid for it W/VISA. The LCD is a SONY product.
    Ordered on Friday received on Tuesday morning...repaired camera that day. The camera worked perfectly as before. The SD500 is a great camera...just LCD probs. Maybe Canon should pay for pain and suffering! I guess you need a hard case for transport & look into getting a screen protector.

    Sorry, no pics, my camera was broken...please laugh now.
    No coverage for "damage" on the warranty. Although one employee at Best Buy said that it would have been covered if we had purchased the camera with the Best Buy credit card. (Something about malicious damage and coverage of items purchased with the Best Buy card until the item is paid off.???) I'm not too sure about this policy!!
    Anywhere from $140+ to have it repaired.

    This is from memory, so use your judgment when following these steps...Nonetheless; you could probably do this on your own without any help.

    Okay, I bought jewelers screwdrivers from Sears. Sizes (cross tips) 000 , 00 & (flat tip) 1/16.
    Wore latex gloves.
    Used an ice pick to work the LCD connecter into the socket.

    Wait till you get the replacement LCD before you start. It helps to know exactly how it looks before you remove the original.

    I put a piece of printer paper on a table.
    I penciled an outline of the camera to the paper.
    I edged the paper with reverse rolled masking tape to hold the screws in their relative locations.

    Remove all visible screws on the outside of the case. The screws are not all the same length.
    Remove the plastic end covers. You will have to use the flat tip to pop one out.
    Now remove the screws under the plastic cover...one is hidden where the wrist strap is located. Slide the plastic/rubber piece that slides under the metal loop for the wrist strap up to reveal the last screw.
    The two halves are now ready to be separated. All the buttons will stay with the cover.
    I was stumped at this point because the covers didn't separate easily at the top. I thought there might be a secret pin or something that needed pushing to release the halves. The halves basically snap together along the top in two or three places. I was frustrated at this point and pulled the bottoms apart enough to slide the camera out of its case. When I did, the two halves popped loose. I think some steady pressure with some slight lateral twisting might do the trick. Try to avoid doing it the way I did because you might bend the tabs resulting in a little gap at the top of the camera case when you snap it back into place.

    With the inside out, you will see the LCD and the touch pads on the back of the camera.
    The LCD is now ready to be removed. As I recall, it is held in place by a screw on the left side as you look at the camera from the back side...and maybe another on the right.
    Study the replacement LCD to determine what actually has to be removed.
    Once the LCD releases, notice how it is plugged in and rotated into place. You can pull the connecter loose at the end of the "ribbon wire" now or wait for the next step.
    I say this because you can't put the connecter back into place at this point and be sure it's properly connected in my opinion.

    You must remove another screw that is located close to the optical viewfinder. Look for the smaller ribbon wire that comes from the silver plate that the LCD rests on (look to the top right of this plate). The screw is under it. Carefully push the wire aside and back out the screw. This screw holds the silver back plate in place on the left and the touch pad to the right. Try not to take the screw all the way out as it will be more difficult to get the two holes to line up. Just lift the two parts up and out of the way to expose the plug.
    If you haven't done so already, pull the connecter loose.
    Use something such as the end of an ice pick to push the new LCD connecter into place. It has a small hole in it perhaps for that purpose.
    I practiced a couple of times with the broken LCD.
    Now go in reverse order to complete the repair.

    I hope this has been of some help. I wish I had documented the procedure as I went along...but have faith, you can do it!

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