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  1. #1
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    Jan 2011
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    help with the A65

    I bought a A65 and shoot alot with a tamron 200-500 i have not had very clear shots with this can someone give me some advice . Have a A330 and had no problems . pulling my hair out trying to figure it out i like to shoot at shutter or aperture priority. I thought these cameras are good at moving subjects , but i have a problem with moving or still.

  2. #2
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    Lightbulb Examining the issue

    Quote Originally Posted by ericst11 View Post
    I bought an α65 and shoot a lot with a Tamron SP AF 200-500mm f/5-6.3 Di LD. I have not had very clear shots with this lens. Can someone give me some advice? I have an α330 and have had no problems. I've been pulling my hair out trying to figure it out. I like to shoot at shutter or aperture priority. I thought these cameras are good at moving subjects, but I have a problem with moving or still.
    One of the problems with dealing with an issue of this nature is understanding the scenario. You are complaining, but you are not providing specific information to base any advice upon.

    That leaves us to start at the beginning and the fact that the α65 is an entirely NEW camera body. You have stated that you are familiar with using the α330, which is basically a starter DSLR camera with a tilt-screen.

    Some basic rules for shooting subject movement:

    1/60 sec = a non-moving flash shot
    1/125 sec = relative assurance that if your subject blinks, you won't see it.
    1/250 sec = used for a subject walking at a normal gait (this is usually the Shutter Speed extreme setting for a non-HSS* flash shot).
    1/500 sec = used to freeze a subject moving at less than 5 mph.
    1/640 sec = will freeze a jump shot
    1/1000 sec = effectively freeze a runner and stop a propeller on an airplane
    1/2000 sec = freeze most traffic movement
    1/4000 sec = effectively freeze aircraft in flight.

    Gauge yourself accordingly... as these are merely guidelines for a "motion shot" set up. HSS* will definitely help freeze moving objects. It allows the camera's shutter to time itself with the external HSS-equipped flash unit. Normal flash shutter speed (1/160 sec) is basically for people standing still. There is nothing special in the new camera that will freeze motion of a subject, other than the standard shutter speed control.

    * High Speed Sync is available with high-end Minolta and SONY external flashes (e.g., 5600 HS D, HVL-F56AM & HVL-F58AM).

    The main thing you need to understand about Aperture Priority mode, is that it is a terrible choice for motion photography. It allows you to use your aperture setting to get the depth of field you desire, but it sacrifices the ability to freeze motion, because the shutter speed will automatically ramp down... as you tighten up the aperture, say going from f/6.3 to f/11, effective ruining your speed capture.

    A way to counter the speed sacrifice is to ramp up the ISO, from say ISO-200 to ISO-1600. That will allow you to shoot three f-stops FASTER. On the α65, the newer sensor design should provide a much less noisy image than you had out of the α330 at that higher ISO.

    You know what... shoot an image out of both cameras at the identical setting. Then, post it here, for comparison.

    When it comes to the performance of the Tamron Super Zoom lens on either camera, I cannot help you there. I have the lens, but I do not have access to this new camera body and there may be issues that no one is aware of yet, because of the camera body being such a new release and the 200-500mm being a pretty exotic range choice for most folks. I have no intention of purchasing an α65, either... so it could be a long wait.

    Anyway, I hope that some of this helps clear up the issue.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 11-29-2011 at 05:46 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #3
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    A 500mm lens is not an easy lens to use and takes practice; easier with a Monopod or tripod.
    It's fairly slow so you need plenty of light to get a decent shutter speed.

    From what I've read, the AF is a bit slow, it needs f8 to be really sharp.
    Crank up the ISO to 1600 and practice but I sure hope you have a steady hand.

  4. #4
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    Ok thanks for your help . the both of you. Here is some of my complaints and how i have it set up.
    I have tried both of these .
    shutter priority at 1/2500 and up and have tried to raise and lower the iso from 400 to 1600 on sitting birds and end up with the same problem grainy and not clear at all. On the sony A65 ,lens tamron 200-500.

    On aperture priority i have tried from a f8 to f11 with a iso from 400-1600 on sitting subjects and ended up with the same unclear and grainy. on the same setup.

    I also have used it on moving subjects with just blurred out pictures i understand that shutter priority is the way to go but still the same problem ,grainy and blurry and unclear and yes i bought the camera brand new and the lens new a year ago when i was getting into shooting wildlife . It just seems that the a330 was much clearer and not even as grainy even at high iso.

  5. #5
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    Lightbulb Being the way I am...

    I would take the "new" camera body back and swap it out. It sounds inherent to the body, if you are getting different results than you do with the a330. If anything, the results should be better, overall, from what I understand from other forums discussing this camera. You might also try the a77... because it and the a65 use the SAME sensor, just to test the overall results.

    Do that and start again. Good luck.

    BTW: here is a link to an a65 review, written by a good and noted acquaintance of mine, Carl Garrard, for what is is worth to you.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 11-30-2011 at 08:07 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  6. #6
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    Jan 2011
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    93
    Thank you Don.

  7. #7
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    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
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    Blurry = Camera shake or low shutter speed or both.
    Unclear = Focus possibly.

    You need to give us a clue. Post pictures.

    Ok, this is the A77 but the same sensor. Point is, not blurry.

    Name:  LR3-0619.jpg
Views: 746
Size:  687.7 KBGrainy = Noise (maybe)
    Camera: Sony A77
    Lens: Minolta AF 200mm f/2.8
    Focal Length: 300mm Equivalent
    Exposure: 1/500th at f4
    ISO 50
    29th Sept 2011
    Last edited by Peekayoh; 11-30-2011 at 10:57 AM.

  8. #8
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    Where to look for "noise"

    Peter,

    As I recall, he addressed the issue as "grainy"... and that is something you really should not notice in today's sensors (under "normal" illumination) unless they are malfunctioning.

    If I were looking for minor defect, due to noise, all you have to do is blow up a solid, light colored area, with a bit of shadowing in it, and inspect it. The telltale speckled purple and green flecks will quickly tell you if you have a noise issue. Noise is supposed to be better controlled in the new sensors, so they say. To me, nothing beats a better exposure... add light, lower the ISO.

    Grainy? That's something else, entirely. That is, more often than not, light starvation in both digital and film cameras. It can result in noise... but that is a side-effect... noise is generated by the sensor... as a substitute for what it cannot get from the light. Grainy looking stuff is just not enough light making to the sensor or the sensor just not being able to use it properly. I mean, they're close... but grainy is not generated by the sensor... it is the result of not enough photon information to create a salient image.

    Again... I suggest a quick comparison between the two identical images (a330 & a65) would be telling, to a point.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 11-30-2011 at 02:15 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #9
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    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
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    Yep, I missed the line...
    Grainy = Noise

    I thought it though.

  10. #10
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    Jan 2011
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    93
    I took the camera over to friend that has been into shooting for a very long time and he shoots with nikon, so he had me shoot the same thing he was shooting in aperture priority 100 iso thru 1600 and same shot on a tripod and compared pictures not much difference in the quality of picture. So he sat down with me and went thru the camera wow their is alot of stuff on this and alot of stuff that the manual doesn't tell you. Is there any sites out there that get indepth on this camera body A65. I 'm thinking its just a new camera that i don't really understand yet and its alot different then my A330.

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