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Thread: 85mm round up

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Apopka, FL
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    I think that that is going to be my next macro lens, after a wide angle.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    Lightbulb MACRO choices

    Personally, I would still consider the TAMRON SP AF 60mm f/2 Di-II LD 1:1 MACRO (IF). It will deliver a superior MACRO shot, it is small, and internally focuses, so their is no filter movement or extension of the lens toward your subject.

    It is designed to work on the APS-C sensor and provides you with, effectively, the standard 90mm shot. The 105mm, on the APS-C sensor is, effectively, 157mm and that is a little long. You have to back up a good foot from your subject to get a good focus.

    Whatever you do, try them both out and see what works before you plunk down the cash.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #13
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    Nov 2010
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    Apopka, FL
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    How do i try them out? Wolf/Ritz camera that is around me doesnt carry almost any sony mount lens's, they are special order only. So that really only leaves B & H

  4. #14
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    Feb 2006
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    Des Plaines, IL
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    Lightbulb Lens checking ...

    I recommend buying BOTH, do the side-by-sides, and return the one that does not cut the mustard. It is fair and they make the sale, seeings that they are not going to fly you to New York for the comparison check. Also, consider that there is a $100 rebate on the TAMRON until ... July 31st.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 05-08-2011 at 07:31 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Apopka, FL
    Posts
    447
    Yeah that $100 rebate is making it hard to decide on that Tamron Macro or a Wide Angle lol

    The reason I was a Wide Angle is because in August were going to Myrtle Beach South Carolina for a family reunion. So I wanted some group shots and i was hoping it would get some good shots at the beach, hopefully some sunrise shots too.

    Is a wide angle lens something that I should get or wait on?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    9,554

    Talking Wide, I oughta ...

    Wide-Angle is all about NOT being able to back up in order to get the shot. Tripods are a marvel and a disaster at the same time. When you are indoors, getting enough room between you and your subject(s) can be a real problem, usually resulting in frustration and something getting knocked over.

    Also, ceilings are only so high, so if you want to get all the artwork on them, without having to panorama the whole shebang (which looking-up and moving can be problematic) ... and which can have all sorts of lighting implications as you creep from one area to another ... it is wide-angle to the rescue. I took the image below with the SIGMA AF 10-20mm f/4.5-5.6 DC EX lens, at the full 10mm. It is effectively a 15mm shot, because I used the α700 APS-C sensor camera. The shot runs from just under the organ loft (at the top), all the way forward to the glass over the alter. It just fit.


    Again, vista images (mountains, plains, waterfalls, etc.), along the horizontal can be done, successfully, with a telephoto and some patience. A wide-angle is more to catch it all if it is moving around (like at a concert or seating problem where you are, again, too close to use a normal lens) ... or again, if you simply cannot back up far enough. It really is more of a "situation" lens, than a routine one. You grab it as your "last resort" lens option. The wider the focal length of a UWA lens ... well, the more option you have.

    TAMRON also has a $50-rebate on its SP AF 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 Di-II LD (IF) lens, until July 31st. You must choose ... and chose wisely. LOL
    Last edited by DonSchap; 05-08-2011 at 08:09 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Apopka, FL
    Posts
    447
    So you think for what i want to do the 28-75 Tamron would work just fine?

    If so that would send me alot of money in the near future.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
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    Talking Some proportionality

    A 28mm-shot, on an APS-C sensor camera body is effectively a 42mm-shot. That is what is referred to as a "normal" focal length ... and to get enough from between you and your 6-foot subject {only one person} (in portrait mode or vertical orientation <- rotating the camera a 1/4 turn) ... you will need to stand at least 8-10 feet away from them. If you shoot wide-ways (landscape mode <- normal kung-fu grip) ... that distance increases to about 12-15 feet for a full body shot. If you have that kind of room the 28-75mm will work. Otherwise ... the 10-24 might be the right choice. You could also buy a 17-50mm f/2.8, which really is the "indoor lens", per se, on the APS-C sensor camera.

    Again, nothing is going to change. Get a tape measure, have your spouse stand across the room, set the lens to 28mm and try to see how far you must back up to get her and some of the background in the image. Try it in both the portrait and landscape orientation. Then, you will know the limitation of your lens.

    Okay, are you writing this down? I feel like I am teaching ...
    Last edited by DonSchap; 05-08-2011 at 08:25 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    That is why I went with the 17-50. I wish it was a 17-80 but it will have to do. I want the 60Macro next.

    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Apopka, FL
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    447
    So the 17mm is a 25.5mm on my sensor?

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