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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    25

    Canon versus Nikon menus

    I am still trying to find the ideal DSLR
    When I read the user guides of the Canon 60D and Nikon D7000, I find that
    the way to access the different settings in the menus is quite different.
    From what I read, it seems that the Canon 60D's menus are more intuitive
    to browse than the Nikon D7000's menus.
    However, since I have no hands on experience, I would like to know from
    those that have, perhpas the difference between the way Nikon and Canon
    organize the menus in general since I think they may each have their own
    view on how to to this and that the way they do it is not specific to one model.
    Willy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    6,931
    You have no experience and apparently no preference so it will make no difference. You will learn whichever camera you buy.
    What is way more important is how the camera feels in your hands and how intuitive to you the buttons and control wheels are. You use those things for every shot. You don't do that with menus.
    Don't buy a camera based on menus.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    25
    Contrary to your statement, I sooner adapt to a camera shape and/or button
    layout than I get used to menu structures that are difficult to use.
    I won't buy based on menus alone, of course not. But the way the menus are
    organized is important to me and I know from experience that some cameras
    have menus that are counter-intuitive and therefore uncomfortable to use.
    I sooner adapt to a the shape of camera or button layout than to "strange"
    menu structures (to me).
    Willy

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    oslo, norway
    Posts
    1,019
    My first DSLR was a canon (followed by another 2 canon DSLR's). Not having used a DSLR before, everything felt new and alien. But after a while it all worked like a charm. Then I sold all my canon gear and bought Nikon gear. While a lot was simmilar, I still had to resort to looking up things in the manual. It was frustrating. And all the extra buttons on the camera itself felt confusing. After a while I got used to Nikon, and love it.

    I got a chance to borrow a canon 5D MKII, and now the canon menu's was frustrating and felt "old" compared to nikon.

    What I'm trying to say is that there's no right and wrong between the two. They are different, but once you learn them (which is just as hard, no matter which one you start out with) then everything feels smooth.

    The big advantage I see in nikon is all the extra buttons on the body itself, the buttons I hated when I started using Nikon. Changing settings on the fly (iso, focus point etc) is a lot more intuitive and easy on the Nikon compared to canon once you get used to it. But it's not like its impossible on canon, so unless you've grown accustomed to using nikon gear, you'll never know that using your canon. And what's good is a subjective thing no matter what, so even if I like one thing - you might hate it.

    So, long story short: it doesn't matter what you buy (imho).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Terra Australis Incognita
    Posts
    3,877
    If it seams like the Canon ones are better to you then go for it. The Nikon ones works great for me, so if Canons are better they must be legendary.

    As the others said, I hardly go into the menus because most common things are on individual buttons. I only go in really to change the length of the countdown timer (about once per year), or to switch between remote flash and onboard flash (about once a month). The menus are easy for these things.
    D800, D300, D90, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200VR f2.8, 300 F4, 105 micro, 16-85VR, 50mm 1.8, Tammy 90 macro, 70-300VR, SB900, 2xSB600, MB-D10, 055XPROB 322RC2. New computers to run photoshop faster. C&C always appreciated. PhotoGallery
    Pressing the shutter is the start of the process - Joe McNally ... Buying the body is the start of the process - Dread Pirate

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    25
    Perhaps I am over-sensitive about the menus. This could be the result of the trauma
    I still experience with my Nikon Coolpix 8700. Every time I browse the menus
    I have the feeling it is the first time and some items seem to be hidden on purpose!
    The 8700 doesn't have much buttons, so it propably less of an item with a DSLR.
    Willy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    326
    Willy,

    I started with DSLRs with a Sony A200. The camera was fine, but it had few dedicated buttons. The menus were pretty logically arranged, so it was fairly easy to find things. I thought it was all OK at first, but then I started getting aggravated with having to hunt for things in the menus. For example, it lacked a second command wheel, so changing either the shutter speed or aperture in Manual mode was a pain.
    Then I bought a Nikon D90, and that made a big difference. It has more dedicated buttons and two command wheels. Making changes is extremely easy (it's even easier with more expensive models because they have even more dedicated buttons), and I hardly ever go into the menus.

    Another thing that is even more important: play with the cameras at a store. When I was looking at new DSLRs, I had narrowed my choices down to either a Canon 50D or Nikon D90. I chose the D90 because it just felt better to me in my hands. It was also lighter. Either system is good, and I didn't care about the brand. It just felt more comfortable, and I don't regret my decision one bit.

    JR

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    25
    Weight is indeed an important factor to me in the sense that if my equipment would become
    to heavy to my taste, it would possibly be used less "in the field". The problem is
    that I can't persuade my wife to carry my stuff, I have to carry it myself
    This is one of the reasons I am thinking about the Canon 550D with 18-135mm kit lens.
    With this combo, I would be able to keep weight around 1Kg.
    However, in the mean time I have been taking a closer look at the 60D also.
    It seems that Canon equipment is lighter in general than Nikons. Nikon also doesn't offer
    a VR lens in the range 18-135mm, I would have to take a 18-200mm, again adding weight.
    I wonder where this will end
    Willy

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
    Posts
    10,424
    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    I wonder where this will end
    Willy
    it doesnt.
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    25
    I'm afraid you may be right. Painfull but true

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