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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Apopka, FL
    Posts
    447
    Here is my two favorites.


    Kit lens- 18-55
    Aperture- f5.6
    Shutter Speed- 1/100
    ISO- 125
    Camera Mode- A
    Flash used- None
    Tripod or Handheld- Handheld
    Filter used- Multi Coated UV filter


    Kit lens- 18-55
    Aperture- f32
    Shutter Speed- 1/4
    ISO- 100
    Camera Mode- A
    Flash used- None
    Tripod or Handheld- Camera was laying on a wooden deck
    Filter used- Multi Coated UV filter

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Switch, if they're your favourites, who's to argue.

    To be a little critical, the exposure of the actual subject leaves something to be desired.
    The bird is underexposed. The dark underside is blocked out, no detail.
    The cascade is overexposed. The highlights are clipped.

    Have you tried "Spot" metering?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Apopka, FL
    Posts
    447
    I never change the exposure, its always set to 0.

    And what do you mean by the highlights are clipped??

    And also no i dont know what spot metering is.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    324
    Switch,

    One thing I would recommend (as a fellow newbie) is reading the book "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson (also know as "the bible" by some). It explains many concepts fairly simply, including metering and even more importantly: where to take your meter reading from.

    JR

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Terra Australis Incognita
    Posts
    3,871
    Put politely they're good shots (I like the waterfall) but they could be better.

    Highlights are clipped is like saying the highlights are blown. That is to say, the whitest parts of the image have gone to pure white and therefore contain no detail and therefore presumably no interest (white isn't much fun to look at).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exposure_%28photography%29
    D800, D300, D90, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200VR f2.8, 300 F4, 105 micro, 16-85VR, 50mm 1.8, Tammy 90 macro, 70-300VR, SB900, 2xSB600, MB-D10, 055XPROB 322RC2. New computers to run photoshop faster. C&C always appreciated. PhotoGallery
    Pressing the shutter is the start of the process - Joe McNally ... Buying the body is the start of the process - Dread Pirate

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
    Posts
    10,424
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    I think I will reserve my opinion until you post EXIF data for your images, because as it stands, there really is nothing I could rationally comment on, without knowing some of that.

    I mean, if you are simply posting for image recognition, there is POTD, but if you really want to discuss how to "improve" or "define" image control ... you need settings and situational data.

    It's a small addition, but really can help when you need to adjust to improve your shots. Everybody is on the same page.
    all of the images have the exif data in tact. right click and use opanda iexif.
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Apopka, FL
    Posts
    447
    Ok so does this look better?


  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Switch, if only it were that simple.
    Once the highlights are clipped you can't recover them.
    The Histogram shows the light pixels piled up like a wall to the right.

    That doesn't mean the image is a dead loss.
    As it is, you've gone out of your way to remove detail and introduce motion blur in the water so you may be quite happy with the result.

    Name:  Switch.jpg
Views: 30
Size:  419.5 KB

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Apopka, FL
    Posts
    447
    Well how can you get all the light and dark pixels to be both right??

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Not always possible.
    The digital sensor doesn't have the dynamic range of the human eye.
    When the dynamic range of the scene exceeds that of the sensor, it's up to you to decide whether to sacrifice shadow detail or highlight detail.

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