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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by sjseto
    Skylinux, I looked at your EXIF data and the exposure is only 1/4s. Stuck pixels usually only appear in long exposures. A stuck pixel looks like a tiny random white dot, and there are usually only a few of them (unlike noise, which is a grain pattern that is everywhere in the picture). Can you manually set your camera to take, say, a 3 s exposure and try it again?
    Stephanie
    Ok, I changed exposure time to max, which is 3s. I think I found one. It's in the top right corner. I circled it.

    http://www.network-technologies.org/...-2005dec24.jpg
    Last edited by Skylinux; 12-24-2005 at 08:39 PM.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3
    i can see quite a few on that... you might want to look at it while verrry slowly scrolling from left to right and right to left, so you can distinguish it from dust on the monitor. Look at the lower left... there are two, fairly bright white spots

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by alubkin
    i can see quite a few on that... you might want to look at it while verrry slowly scrolling from left to right and right to left, so you can distinguish it from dust on the monitor. Look at the lower left... there are two, fairly bright white spots
    I went over the picture after posting and found more towards the bottom.
    Thanks for confirming how they look like on a digicam.
    I will update the picture to show more spots.

  4. #14
    strongheart Guest

    Black Hat

    Thanx for the excellent article.

    One thing to add to the arsenal of night photography is a black hat.

    Long exposures may get ruined by incidental light,
    a stray parking car nearby or a flashlight or camera flash cigarette lighter etc.
    A black hat could be used to cover the lense for a moment or so (without touching the camera) until the offending light source is gone.

    A human foreground subject can get flashed, cover the lense and the subject can walk away. If the poser was against a dark zone, all is well, but if the subject was blocking background light (s)he'll look like a ghost in the photo.

    ~S~

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    India
    Posts
    125
    Exif which I read was like

    Exposure Time = 10"
    F Number = F6.3
    Exposure Program = Manual
    ISO Speed Ratings = 64
    Exif Version = Version 2.2
    Date Time Original = 2005-12-18 17:50:44
    Date Time Digitized = 2005-12-18 17:50:44
    Components Configuration = YCbcr
    Compressed Bits Per Pixel = 5
    Exposure Bias Value = Ī0EV
    Max Aperture Value = F2.83
    Metering Mode = Spot
    Light Source = unknown
    Flash = Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length = 6.3mm
    Fuji S6500 FD
    Olympus FE115(For kids and wife)

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    110
    nice tips thanks very much

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    110
    i would like to know how to select the best shutter speed from the first time sime times i took 5 shots then i found the best shutter speed how to know from the first time ?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    2,364
    We should turn this into an interactive lesson. Try it and post our results and methodology.
    US Navy--Hooyah!

    Nikon D700/D300|17-35 f/2.8, 24-70 f/2.8, Sigmalux, 80-200 f/2.8, 16 f/2.8 fisheye,

    Lots of flashes and Honl gear.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1
    Hi, I just joined this forum and reading the tips provided here is great.

    Regarding the tips for night shots, I have 1 question concerning Tip 2:

    "This is how it works. The next time youíre out to take night photos, go ahead and snap a picture of Scene A, as you normally would. Then, when itís convenient, take a photo of the exact same Scene A again, but with the lens cap on."

    I don't understand what you mean by take a photo of the same scene again with the lens cap on. Wouldn't that just give me a black image? And couldn't I just point my camera at any direction (with the same ISO, WB, A and S settings)?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Windy Wyoming, USA
    Posts
    2,605
    That's right, you'll have a dark image with nothing in it but noise/hot spots. As the guide goes on to say,

    "Now you will have two images, one night shot and one control shot (with the hot pixels). Load them up in say, Paint Shop Pro. Switch to the control shot and select Edit and Copy from the menu. Next, switch to the night shot and paste the copied image as a new layer. Then, select the new layer and change the Blend Mode to Difference and click OK. You’ll get the correct night shot with the hot spots subtracted out."

    The dark image is used to isolate the noise/hot spots so you can remove them from the image in PP without affecting the rest of the image.

    BTW I've never used this technique. I think you're right that you could point the camera in any direction.
    Nikon D50, Nikkor 18-55mm, Nikkor 50mm 1.8, Sigma 70-300mm APO DG Macro, Tokina 12-24
    Flickr

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