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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Apopka, FL
    Posts
    447

    New to DSLR cameras

    So yesterday i got my very first SLR camera, its an a33. Ive been a point and shoot user ever since i got my first camera and i decided that i wanted something better since ill be having a little one here by the end of the month, dont want to miss those first's.

    I already want to get a zoom lens, maybe this one if its a good one.
    http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs/...52921665233511

    I dont know really anything about all the different settings these cameras can do but i know ill learn.

    Here is a couple pictures I took of my dog playing catch in the back yard a little while ago.




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Oh, good show, a new member, welcome to the Bear Pit!
    LOL, just kidding.

    So, how much spare cash have you got available? I love spending someone else's money!
    Oh well, probably "not a lot" with a new arrival so close. Anyway, congratulations all round!

    Look, the 18-250mm is a capable lens but IMO "a jack of all trades and master of non". The zoom range is far too wide for any real quality. That probably won't worry you just yet but you will soon hanker for something a little bit better.

    In any case what you really need right now, in preparation for next month, is a short, fast prime lens. Why? you need to get in close because babies are small, chances are you will be inside in poor light so you need a wide aperture and you don't really want to frighten the poor little tyke half to death with a bloody great flash from a couple of feet away.

    Fortunately these don't have to cost a fortune, see here...
    Model number: SAL-35F18

    Model number: SAL-50F18

    You could stick with the 18-55mm SAM that came with the camera (that's an assumption) but ..
    Name:  18-55 SAM Aperture.jpg
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    the aperture gets small very quickly as you can see.

    This is all probably a bit too much information right now but my advice is to get the 35mm lens and start practicing. Find out how the lens behaves at wide apertures in a low light situation and get to grips with the small Depth of Field. It's too late to start when Junior puts in an appearance, you'll have your hands full.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Apopka, FL
    Posts
    447
    Thanks for the info, ill def. have to look into one of those lenses!

    when you say this "Find out how the lens behaves at wide apertures in a low light situation and get to grips with the small Depth of Field" what do you mean?

    And what lens would you suggest for something farther away? like close up's of animals or something?
    Last edited by Switchblade906; 11-12-2010 at 05:23 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Welcome to the forum and good luck with your new camera. I use the Tamron 70-300 for all my bird images. It is a cheap lens that needs light but I have been getting good results from it for the last 3 years. The Minolta 50mm f/1.7 or f/1.4 are also good lens that are not too much.

    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,756
    if you are not looking for perfection you can get minolta af lenses at a good price...quality is still better than kits lenses

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Quote Originally Posted by Switchblade906 View Post
    Thanks for the info, ill def. have to look into one of those lenses!

    when you say this "Find out how the lens behaves at wide apertures in a low light situation and get to grips with the small Depth of Field" what do you mean?

    And what lens would you suggest for something farther away? like close up's of animals or something?
    Which is where things get interesting, or difficult depending on your POV.

    Put simply DOF(depth of field) is the distance in front/behind the plane of focus (whatever you focused on) which remains acceptably sharp. This is not fixed in stone but there are mathematical rules which give us the probable boundaries.

    This is an extract from a spreadsheet I made giving the values for 35mm and 50mm lenses ...
    Distance in feet going down and Apertures across the top. 35mm on the left, 50mm on the right.
    DOF is controlled by
    1)Magnification. The bigger the subject is in the VF (Viewfinder) the smaller the DOF becomes.
    2)Aperture. The Larger the Aperture (smaller numbers) the smaller the DOF becomes.
    Name:  DOF 35&50mm.jpg
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    We all struggle with indoor, available light shots.
    A large Aperture (say f2) = small DOF
    Smaller Apertures = slower shutter speed which blur the image.
    Higher ISOs introduce detail robbing noise.

    Which is why I say you need practice.
    I bet you already have a Teddy Bear. That's about the right size so there's your subject.
    Put it in the Cot or get the Missus to hold it.
    Get as much window light on the subject as possible.
    Set the camera to iso400, choose (A)perture priority mode and f4.
    Fill the frame with the Bear and see what shutter speed the camera offers.
    If you're lucky, it will be above 1/125 (new Babies are not that active so you can get away with slower shutters).
    If not, open up the Aperture to f2.8 or bump the iso to 800 and try again.

    It all depends on the available light. If you were outside in the Sun, you could get to 1/250th at f5.6 and all your troubles would go away, you could also use the 18-55mm to good effect. Unfortunately the time of year is against you unless you're in the far South.

    I'm rushing this a bit cos I have to be up early in the morning and i need some kip.
    I'm sure others will join in with some good advice.

    Oh, you asked about a longer lens.
    You need a 70-210mm to compliment your 18-55mm.
    If you have the cash, try the 70-300mm G. This lens is good value for what it delivers.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,756
    it all depends on what you want to do with the pictures you take.......if you just want home picture to print 4x5 at walmart...then i good lens will do nothing for you.............if you are blowing up to make posters then you'll need some zeiss glass

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