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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Watch out for recoil when you fire that thing.

    And mind you don't burn the fishnets off that Model you use ... although!!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Cool Fully charged ... and the first couple of shots tell the tale

    I do not want to jump the gun, here, but I must say, I am sincerely impressed by the new flash.

    TTL on the SONY HVL-F58AM was always a struggle for me and I just usually shot like I used to, with the MANUAL determination of the right amount of light. Well, when it comes to TTL determination, I mean to tell ya ... the Metz has it in spades over the SONY flash.

    Of the few test shots I've done, under similar situations of the past ... what a difference. I will post some comparisons later, because I really feel there is a remarkable shift in the proper TTL-exposure between the two. Obviously, for the extra change this flash costs, there should be an improvement ... and there definitely appears to be.

    Appearances are everything in photography.

    I also seems that you only have heat issues is you are roaring along at FULL POWER. The 1/2 power normal flash, for a lot of shots, does not seem all that fierce, so flaming fishnets may not be so worrisome.

    Admittedly, the flash is not an easy tote, like the HVL-F56AM, but the results are easy on the eye and the amount of post-processing, later.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Thumbs up Equipped ...

    Well, UPS finally got it here in one piece and, yes, operational. I have to admit, this silver bad boy is truly sharp, with the limited exposure I have had with it. I did a few operational test shots and it rings out a rather sharp looking image, at 400mm f/5.6. The Tokina AT-X 840 could be a bit soft, from time to time.

    Here's a handful of photographic power ...

    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,760
    Did you try it on both your alphas?

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Thumbs up Mount up, partner!

    Quote Originally Posted by SONYNUT View Post
    Did you try it on both your alphas?
    Yes, it seems to work equally well on both the α850 and the α700.

    I have to work, tomorrow, but afterward, I should be able to take a few shots. My shooting plans were totally thrown off by the two day delay getting a "working" example of the lens in house. Today was supposed to be my shooting day and it wound up with me all over town, taking care of this and that, then waiting for the UPS guy to show up with the replacement lens (who I almost missed).

    Honest to Jake, this has been one wickedly bad week for planning much of anything.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    How did they get you a replacement so fast???


    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Cool Process shortcuts ...

    Frank,

    I had to place ANOTHER order. Heck, the reship to get the broken one back did not take place until Thursday morning, from the UPS Store in town, as a return for REFUND, not REPLACEMENT. Once I discovered the fouled up lens, I called B&H and just reordered another one discounted to the SALE PRICE.

    I must say, credit can be a handy tool, sometimes, as ALL I am waiting on, now, is the refund to my card, not the replacement of the lens. By doing so, it "saved" this weekend for the use of the new lens. Thankfully, they have the stock to pull something like this off. Adorama might, also. I don't think our Calumet Photographic even has one of these in their corporate stockpile, much less the local stock! Two? Yeah, right.

    I learned, after I had the SONY 70-200mm f/2.8 G SSM lens problem that waiting around for them to get the lens repaired or replaced was an effort not for the weak-of-stomach. All that money you saved up and spent tied up in a lens that is just floating around, out there, and that you STILL cannot even use. "No way" I say ... process me a REFUND for this "paper weight" and send me another new lens.

    Bottom line: We just start over.

    Obviously, when you usually buy off ebay or some such one-of-kind way, there is usually only one item, so you are stuck, but when you buy from one of these monster warehouse merchants, they usually have the additional stock to pull from.

    Now, I must admit, with the 70-200, when I bought it (<- click for the reference thread on this event) ... that was NOT the case ... I had bought the "last one" in national inventory (thinking I was lucky ... hah!), which was defective. There was no replacement, so I had to wait to have it fixed. Even so, I returned it ... pretty ticked off, because I had missed having it for all my holiday shots ... the very reason I had purchased it in the first place.

    What good is getting a lens AFTER the real event has occurred? Sure ... next time, but you really need your equipment ready to go BEFORE the shoot, not afterward. Ah me ... such is life.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 07-17-2010 at 07:37 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    This is the issue I have with SSM.
    The lenses with screw drive will outlast these electronic newcomers by a significant factor.
    My Minolta HS lenses seem to be the equal of SSM, maybe even faster.
    The screw drive motor is in the body which has a shorter life anyway than lenses.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Cool Silence is golden, golden .. but, my eyes still see

    Peter, not everyone will stick with a body, these days, for better than three years. Several of my SLR bodies are nearly two decades old and they still operate just fine. Yes, they do need maintenance for age, as the light box seals deteriorate, but they are still operational in the truest sense.

    When it comes to DSLRs, though, obviously these are the growing point of all coming change, because, as you have stated, the optics are pretty standard. Every two tyears, the technology of the sensors change ... requiring a new camera body (because your DSLR's sensor is your "film" ... and you cannot change it out) to keep current. I agree that SSM is a good source for future failure.

    I also know that earlier Minolta lenses were built with gearing that was much faster than today's version, the lens motors were a little slower. That's kind of why the SIGMA 75-300 focus gears get sheered to pieces when placed on the SONY bodies.

    In fact, if you examine an earlier Minolta 1.4x T/C versus the later release, the speed change is almost "half" ... as the latter was "dumbed down" in its mechanical response. Having one of these older T/Cs can really be an amazing experience, as your 70-210mm f/4 or 135mm f/2 rockets from one extreme focus point to the other.

    The biggest trait that an SSM lens subtracts is ... shhh ... can you hear it? I don't think so. The silence is deafening.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 07-17-2010 at 08:18 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    I agree, it's quiet but I like to hear it operating and I don't find it particularly loud, less disturbing than the mirror slap.

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