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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    295

    Help me pick a camera bag.

    I have been looking for a new camera bag recently. I am planning on picking up a 55-200 VR and a 35mm f/1.8 (hopefully the 55-200 before fall and the 35mm before the new year) and sticking that in a bag along with my SB600 and filters, batteries, memory cards, etc. The bag must be a backpack style. I do not want a sling/shoulder style. The two things that I need on/with my bag is a way to hold a tripod, and a external pocket for a water bottle. One thing I would like is for it to not be a super deep bag as to make me feel like I am falling backwards (I will be using my D5000 for quite a while so it can be somewhat shallow)

    I looked through some old threads, and came across this one.
    http://www.dcresource.com/forums/sho...lowepro+review

    I am a big fan of the Lowepro Mini Trekker AW as it appears to be shallow, hold a body, a long lens and a couple of small lenses, a flash, and the tripod. It doesn't show if there is any pocket for a water bottle on the side though, which is unfortunate. As well, since the bag is somewhat smaller, the tripod attaches to the face of the bag, meaning that I would have to take it off everytime to access the body/lenses. It would be nice it it attached to the side of the bag, but I wouldn't expect that on this small of a bag.

    Is there any other bags that meet my requirements around the same price as the mini trekker? I am pretty confident that I am going to be going with Lowepro, but just wanted to make sure I am not missing out on something.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    6,929
    You need to spend some time on the Cambags site.

    I'm going through the same process but for a larger bag. At this stage first choice for me is probably a Crumpler Karachi Outpost. When the Crumpler store gets stock again and rings me I will let you know. The beauty of Crumpler bags is that they are built like tanks and don't look like camera bags, expensive but worth every penny.

    If the Crumpler doesn't work for me my next choice is Kata.

    I'm not a fan of Lowepro, never have been.
    Last edited by K1W1; 07-07-2010 at 09:22 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    295
    I have spent a bunch of time on cambags.com. That is why I know I am liking the Lowepro. I am currently using a small Promaster bag for a camera and a single lens without a flash. So I am totally sure that the Lowepro will be better quality than my current Promaster.

    The crumpler is a very nice bag, no doubt about that, but it is a little more than I would like to spend right now. I can get the Mini Trekker on ebay for just under $80, while the cheapest I can find that model Crumpler is $250 on Amazon. At this point, I just feel that the Crumpler is a little more than I need.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    794
    Crumpler or broke.

    I have a Nikon branded Crumpler that I picked up for dirt cheap from a retailer.

    Space for 2 bodies, 2 flashes and a few medium sized lenses. It also has space for a jersey, notebook and all kinds of accessories.



    Love it to death
    My Savior, My Leader, My Father and My Shepard.
    I praise thee Lord All Mighty


    D700/Nikkor 14-24mm 2.8/Nikkor 24-70mm 2.8/Sigma 70-300mm 4-5.6 APO/ Nikkor 50mm 1.8

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Kanagawa, Japan
    Posts
    267
    I'm baffled about Crumpler bags and why some folks like them. They look nice, smart styling. But they are too freaking heavy (heavy as tanks!), and seem not very practically designed for carrying stuff around or general use. Too much damn velcro! Oh, and way overpriced.

    I like LowePro AW bags, because they are tough and mostly well designed. They are also a good compromise on weight. Not too heavy, but not so light that they feel flimsy.

    Kata bags are generally well designed, and the winners in the light weight contest. But I can't get over the feeling they are not made of durable materials, because they are too lightweight.

    Tamrac bags feel solid, but the models available to me here in Japan are on the small side.

    I use two different Lowepro bags - a shoulder bag and a large hip pack. They are very well made and designed.

    However, when it came to getting a backpack for my camera, I was not happy with the LowePro options, particularly b/c I want to also carry a laptop at times. Their laptop+camera bags were either too big or too small. I was very close to getting a Kata DR-467i, but just didn't like the feel of it on my back, and couldn't get over the flimsy feeling.

    I had been using a Ogio Metro pack, which has nice side pockets you can stick lenses into, and a deep main compartment that will fit a padded insert (or my Lowepro hip bag) with my D90 and lenses. But the Ogio zippers died within a year. So, last week I went in a completely different direction. I picked up a CamelBack Urban Assault XL backpack, from one of the stores at a military base here. It's on the heavy side, but has tons of pockets, and a deep main compartment that holds a foam insert bag quite nicely. It's not going to win any awards for quick access. But it doesn't really look like a camera or laptop bag.
    "No matter where you go, there you are."
    -Buckaroo Banzai


    Nikon D90 | Nikkor 18-105VR | AF Nikkor 50 f/1.4D | AF Micro Nikkor 105 | AF Nikkor 20 f/2.8D | AF Nikkor 70-300VR |
    Canon IXY 810IS | Canon UW Housing


    My Picasa Site

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    794
    Umijim - I agree on the heavy part, but it's not so heavy that it's not practical.

    As for the velcro, mine certainly does not suffer from that. Only velcro it has is to fix the dividers into different setups. It's a fantastic bag and I'll more than likely never feel the need to replace it.

    I've dropped the bag in a pool and the inside was completely dry
    My Savior, My Leader, My Father and My Shepard.
    I praise thee Lord All Mighty


    D700/Nikkor 14-24mm 2.8/Nikkor 24-70mm 2.8/Sigma 70-300mm 4-5.6 APO/ Nikkor 50mm 1.8

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    City of Lights, City of Casinos, City of Sin -- Must be Las Vegas!
    Posts
    1,512
    Quote Originally Posted by Myboostedgst View Post
    The bag must be a backpack style . . . The two things that I need on/with my bag is a way to hold a tripod, and a external pocket for a water bottle.
    Perhaps, out of your price range; however, one of the backpacks I own is a LowePro Dry Zone Rover, which has a built-in hydration system like a CamelBak.

    http://products.lowepro.com/product/...er,1936,18.htm
    Canon G10 - Nikon D3 - Sony P&S - Flickr Account - Non-updated Website

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    295
    Thanks for the advice guys.

    Just curious, is there any advantage to having a bag that doesn't look like a camera bag other than it not being as likely to get stolen? And damn you guys, the more I look at Crumpler bags the more I like them. I just can't justify spending over $200 on a bag at this point when it will be pretty much empty for years to come.

    Are there any other Crumpler backpacks that might be a little smaller but also a little cheaper? I looked at the Whitney & Cox and it is still over $200. The Keystone looks great, possibly my top choice in Crumpler bags, but it is almost exactly $200. As well, the Crumpler bags dont have a spot for a water bottle or a tripod.

    I am going to sit on it for a little while. Just need to decide sometime relatively soon as my buddy wants to buy my old bag for his new D40 and 18-55.

    Edit: There is a spot on the Crumpler for a tripod...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    6,929
    The Crumpler store rang this afternoon to say that they had a Karachi Outpost for me to look at so I may have an owners review for you tomorrow.

    BTW. They have big side pockets that you can fit a water bottle in.

    Advantages of not having a bag that looks like a camera bag are simply that it doesn't look like a camera bag. Anybody with a camera bag today has expensive gear in it otherwise they would have a P&S in their pocket. I know I will be able to beat a Crumpler back pack to death and it will look like some dodgy student back pack be stained and dirty and look like it will only have old McDonalds wrappers, a Playboy and an iPod in it but it will still protect my gear perfectly.

    What you need size wise is a Crumpler 5 or 6 Million Dollar Home but unfortunately they aren't backpacks.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    295
    Defenitly let me know if you pick up the Crumpler. I am still debating between the medium outpost and the mini trekker aw. I am going to look into the 7 million dollar home as well for the time being.

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