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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6

    Macro picture taking with D5000

    hey guys!
    I just got my nikon D5000. I got it with the 18-55VR lens and the 55-200 VR lens. I am interested in takeing some macro photos of flowers, insects, ect. I have haveing problems with it zooming with the auto zoom to be able to get up super close! I have tried both lenes. I have also tried doing a manual focus and that does not work well either. I would like to know what lens would be recomended? I would also like to know what kind of settings I should have the camera on? any and all info regarding this subject would be great!
    Thanks
    Road

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    6,931
    Neither lens is a macro lens so you will have difficulty getting close to small things and focussing.
    You have two basic choices;
    1. Buy a set of extension tubes that sit between your camera body and lens and will allow it to focus on very close objects. This is an inexpensive solution and the tubes can be used with all lenses you own but you will need to focus manually.
    2. Buy a dedicated macro lens. A dedicated macro lens will allow you to focus on very close objects at large ratios. They can also be used as a standard lens. the Tamron 90mm Macro lens is a very popular value for money option.
    Last edited by K1W1; 06-23-2010 at 02:58 AM. Reason: Spelling and grammer

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    32
    Hi

    I just checked the of both lenses on nikon.com

    AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR :
    Closest focusing distance 0.28m/0.9ft
    Maximum reproduction ratio 1/3.2

    AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED:
    Closest focusing distance 0.95m
    Maximum reproduction ratio 1/4.4

    This means that you cant focus any distance closer to 0.28m or 0.95m even when using manual zoom. The key to this is to use extension tubes or macro lenses as K1W1 pointed out.
    Or just wait until one of the very talented Bug/dragonfly/whatever_crawls photographers of this forum replies (those guys can answer all of your questions and more )

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Terra Australis Incognita
    Posts
    3,877
    K1W1 was spot on with his advice. If you look in the photo gallery you'll see shots from Rawpaw using avery good $2000 lens (70-200VR) with Kenko extension tubes (they cost around $100, would work with your lenses and transmit the electronic exposure etc info to the cam, some brands don't).

    I shoot using the budget dedicated macro, Tamron 90mm (about $500). This without tubes still allows 1:1 reproduction ratio's. It feels like it focusses at about 3 inches - don't know what the spec says.

    Other have other combinations depending on what they shoot, what their partners let them sink into gear to photograph bugs and flowers rather than kids. Bugs are better with longer macro lenses, Rooz always suggests the Sigma 150mm, flowers with shorter lenses (they don't scare and run away). I find the 90 a good compromise.

    Note a dedicated macro 90mm lens can be used as a nice portrait lens for the wife but they do focus more slowly than non macro lenses as they have to travel further (to give precise focussing needed for macro shots.
    D800, D300, D90, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200VR f2.8, 300 F4, 105 micro, 16-85VR, 50mm 1.8, Tammy 90 macro, 70-300VR, SB900, 2xSB600, MB-D10, 055XPROB 322RC2. New computers to run photoshop faster. C&C always appreciated. PhotoGallery
    Pressing the shutter is the start of the process - Joe McNally ... Buying the body is the start of the process - Dread Pirate

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6
    Thanks Guys for all the info once again alot of help!! I dont know if I am ready to drop alot more money into this camera yet I have only had it a week. So I guess I need a little more info on the tubes. If there are any websites that explain them and show what they look like. Again thanks for all that info again guys!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    6,931

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Maryland's Eastern Shore
    Posts
    2,143
    I like using tubes for my macro work, they will not work on your 18-55 because of the way it focuses your subject would have to be inside your lens. They will however work for your 55-200, I prefer using them on a zoom lens to help acquire focus at different distances, different comp and more or less dof. Some tubes are af while others are cheaper and only mf.

    There is another option and that is the Canon filter at about $75 is supposed to
    produce some very nice results. More dof than tubes, cheaper and smaller to carry.
    - Rich

    Nikon: D50, 18-70mm, 50mm, 70-200vr
    Kenko: 12mm, 20mm, 36mm Ext Tubes
    Manfrotto: 486RC2
    Benro: A-327 tripod


    My Flickr Photos Here

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6
    As everyone can tell I am very new to the SLR camera/ and high quality photography. I did a little looking on the tubes and still have a couple more questions. I noticed that alot of the manual focus tubes also talk about apature adjustments. I know that there is a setting on the D5000 I think it is the A setting on it. However I dont know what would be a good setting if someone could give me a couple examples that would be great! I also notices that I can get some tubes that will also allow af but they seem to be running around 100$. Is it worth spending the 100$ on the tubes or can I get a decent Macro lens for just a bit more?

    Rawpaw I also am very new and dont fully understand all the short hand in your reply such as: DOF. I also tried to look up the Cannon Filter and just got alot of UV filters and what not. K1W1 and everyone else thanks for all the help!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Maryland's Eastern Shore
    Posts
    2,143
    Sorry about the abbreviations. Oh and welcome to the forum.
    Here is the link to the lens/filter that will fit your lens.
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc....html#features

    My tubes are auto focus and I like that, but the set cost me about $170.
    Many macro shooters manual focus everything so it may or may not be an
    issue for you. Macro shooting kills your depth of field where not much of your
    subject is in focus. Extension tubes take some getting used to to get nice results.
    Click on my flickr page and I have a section of macro tube shots, most have
    shooting info under the properties.

    Tha macro lens my good friend Richard (K1W1) mentioned
    is a wonderful all round macro lens $410.
    Also gives you lower light lens at constant f/2.8
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc..._f_2_8_Di.html
    Last edited by rawpaw18; 06-24-2010 at 02:57 AM.
    - Rich

    Nikon: D50, 18-70mm, 50mm, 70-200vr
    Kenko: 12mm, 20mm, 36mm Ext Tubes
    Manfrotto: 486RC2
    Benro: A-327 tripod


    My Flickr Photos Here

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Terra Australis Incognita
    Posts
    3,877
    As my friend said to me, the 90mm Tamron macro should come with a warning. You won't look at your other lenses the same way again. This is a very sharp lens and lets you take a style of shots your current lenses wont do. I replaced my old $900 lens (with $1,500 of lenses) after buying the Tammy.

    Do you need to take macro shots now or are you happy to use and enjoy your current gear for a while first.

    You are able to take incredible shots with your current gear, eg this thread is full of photos with the same lenses and a cheaper body than you currently have. If you take the time to look through it a bit you'll also notice how they got better over time and with critique.
    http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=28957
    D800, D300, D90, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200VR f2.8, 300 F4, 105 micro, 16-85VR, 50mm 1.8, Tammy 90 macro, 70-300VR, SB900, 2xSB600, MB-D10, 055XPROB 322RC2. New computers to run photoshop faster. C&C always appreciated. PhotoGallery
    Pressing the shutter is the start of the process - Joe McNally ... Buying the body is the start of the process - Dread Pirate

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