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Thread: Sony or canon?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    4

    Question Sony or canon?

    Hello

    new here, want to konw if i must buy canon or sony dslr?

    i like sony, as i have my 15 year old camcorder never go wrong, my tv, laptop, everything is sony.

    but ask my friend he said sony camera is bulls*t and i have to buy market leader canon. he is a pro. so have to ask in sony forum to get input from sony ownners.

    budget is $600-700 for new dslr. also interest in olympus pen, but it is also cannot compare to real slr.

    cheers
    Leong

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    1,760
    you get what you pay for......for 600 you may as well buy a point and shoot.......

  3. #3
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    Nov 2008
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    Not very helpful Sonynut!
    Seeing as I'm in the UK, what does $700 buy you in the States?

  4. #4
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    Nov 2008
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    Monmouthshire, UK
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    ....and I'm happy for you but it doesn't answer the question.

    I just had a look on B&H and it seems that the obvious choice is ...
    Alpha A380 Digital SLR with 18-55mm Lens @ $700

    A better choice would be the ....
    DSLR-A500 12.3 MP Digital SLR Camera With 18-55mm $750
    but it's over budget.

    ps_ Why not a second hand A700.
    Last edited by Peekayoh; 05-14-2010 at 05:37 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    326
    sgguy,

    Go with Canon or Nikon. I'll explain why:
    I was in your position a couple of years ago. Just about all my electronics are Sony -- heck, I used to work for them. I bought a Sony DSLR, was happy with it. But, I didn't (and still don't) see a future in their DSLR system. So, I recently switched to Nikon, and couldn't be happier. I did some un-scientific testing, and the Nikon zoom lenses were sharper than some of the Sony prime lenses.
    So, save yourself some money in the long run (switching systems is not cheap), and go with a Canon Rebel T1i (called 500D outside the US) or a Nikon D5000.

    JR

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
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    I would say it depends alot on what type of pictures you generally take with the camera. Keep in mind that with DSLRs the cost of the camera body is relatively small in comparison to the lenses you will want/need.

    With Sony's in-body stabilization, you can add lower cost lenses and still get the benefit of being able to hand hold in low-light situations, e.g. indoors. With Canon, you are looking at serious $$$ for its image stablization lenses. Now, Canon attempts to make up for that with better quality at high ISO which allows faster shutter speeds, but the high ISO range is generally available in Canon's higher end models which will probably blow past your budget range.

    I would suggest putting a post in the Canon forum with your budget range and ask what people would recommend, why, and what benefits they see with such cameras. Then compare to your Sony options within your price range.

    As far as Sony goes, I would agree with the recommendation of spending a bit more and going with the A500. But if you can squeez out more of a budget, the Sony DSLR-A550 14.2 MP Digital SLR Camera With 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 DT AF Zoom Lens ($949 at B&H) has received some really good reviews.
    Darin Wessel
    α 900
    Zooms: Tamron SP AF70-200mm f2.8 Di LD Macro; Sigma 28-90mm D macro, Konica-Minolta 18-70 f3.5-5.6
    Primes: Minolta 28mm f2.8; Sony 50mm f1.4
    Minolta RC-1000 remote commander

    Film:
    Calumet Cambo CC400 4x5 View Camera
    YashikaMat 6x6 TLR (other accessories)
    Minolta Maxxum 7000 w/ Minolta 35-80mm f/4-5.6 & Minolta 2800 flash
    Minolta Maxxum 5000i & Vivitar 728 AFM flash
    What's next???

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    1,760
    or sell the wife and kids and get an A900 ;-)

  8. #8
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    Feb 2006
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    Des Plaines, IL
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    Lightbulb At this point in time ...

    The wise choice would be to pick something you can easily get items for, locally. One of the problems SONY is apparently having is that they are redefining themselves and taking away dedicated resources from advanced DSLR development. That makes for some really difficult decisions on the user's part, because they are left "in the dark", guessing, and SONY is doing nothing to quell their concerns.

    While Nikon and Canon have made substantial steps to address the user market, even they are curiously spinning around concerning low-end users.

    But first and foremost, do not be naive ... a truly "honest" DSLR budget is a hell of a lot more than just $650. You just need to look through the manufacturer's or vendor's catalogs and price out your lens path from 18mm all the way to 300mm. JUST SIT DOWN ... spend some real time at it ... and figure out how to get there, because the kit lens (18-55mm) only goes so far ... and then you will get angry, because you did NOT budget for anything additional, like a flash or the other lens you will need.

    Over and over, you will witness "beginner's lament", as you read through the forums. Ignorance is not bliss, when it comes to photography. In fact, I would venture to say you really need to get ahead of photography knowledge, because it is that very thing that will allow you to determine your needs.

    Some early decisions are:
    • If you plan on only taking indoor photographs ... get an external flash to go with your DSLR.
    • If you need to take images of "little Johnny" scooting across the football field (during the day) ... you will need at least a 70-300mm telephoto zoom lens. If we are taking these images "under the lights" ... the price goes up.
    • Low-light encounters, indoors, where flash is prohibited ... 50mm f/1.8 lens (to at least have a chance of enough light).


    Despite whether you go SONY or any other manufacturer, take a quick read through the sticky thread in this SONY DSLR Forum. (<- click on link) It will shed some light on your early options and basic choices. Personally, to initially save a few 'overall' bucks, I would elect to FORGET the 18-55mm kit lens and just go with a 'third-party' (SIGMA or TAMRON) 18-250mm lens. It can cover a lot of ground, right away, and stall off the purchase of other lenses.

    Good luck ... and please consider at least $2000 as a real "starter budget." Even that is getting off extremely cheap and probably with some relatively "limited" optics. A DSLR is a whole lot more than a simple camera. It is the center of a "system" to a photographic solution.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 05-14-2010 at 08:33 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    4
    Thank you all for the input. I bouhtg a canon 550 yesterday and a tamron 70-300 lens. I took some shots of my house, plants, etc, but most come out blurred with the tamron ??? Wy old panasonic fz5 I use is not bluring like this one, is this lens a faulty? Because the original canon lens is not blurring like this.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
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    602
    Quote Originally Posted by sgguy View Post
    Thank you all for the input. I bouhtg a canon 550 yesterday and a tamron 70-300 lens. I took some shots of my house, plants, etc, but most come out blurred with the tamron ??? Wy old panasonic fz5 I use is not bluring like this one, is this lens a faulty? Because the original canon lens is not blurring like this.
    It would help if you posted some of the pictures for us to tell what might be going on. There are a couple of things that might be happening. If your camera is on continual area focus with a wider open aperatures (eg f 2.8) very little movement on your part will cause the focus to shift off of your intended subject; try changing to single shot spot focus.
    Darin Wessel
    α 900
    Zooms: Tamron SP AF70-200mm f2.8 Di LD Macro; Sigma 28-90mm D macro, Konica-Minolta 18-70 f3.5-5.6
    Primes: Minolta 28mm f2.8; Sony 50mm f1.4
    Minolta RC-1000 remote commander

    Film:
    Calumet Cambo CC400 4x5 View Camera
    YashikaMat 6x6 TLR (other accessories)
    Minolta Maxxum 7000 w/ Minolta 35-80mm f/4-5.6 & Minolta 2800 flash
    Minolta Maxxum 5000i & Vivitar 728 AFM flash
    What's next???

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