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  1. #1
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    Question Why don't dSLRs have video modes?

    I have been wondering why dSLRs do not have video modes.
    I realize that you would not be able to use the viewfinder while recording video, but since all (as far as I know) dSLRs have a monitor on the back that could be used for composition/tracking of the video clip that problem should be surmountable.
    Anyone know why?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coltess
    I have been wondering why dSLRs do not have video modes.
    I realize that you would not be able to use the viewfinder while recording video, but since all (as far as I know) dSLRs have a monitor on the back that could be used for composition/tracking of the video clip that problem should be surmountable.
    Anyone know why?
    As far as I know, I've not come across a DSLR that can shoot video clips.

  3. #3
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    This is my personal opinion, so don't take it as The Word, but I am pretty sure they don't because DSLR's actually mimic film cameras. Basically what I am trying to say is that small point and shoot camera sensors are constantly "seeing" light. There is no physical shutter in front of the CCD, the manuf. consider it an "electronic" shutter. On some DSLR's there is a cleaning mode where the shutter and the aperature will open to their fullest, and the mirror will flip up, but this is primarily for cleaning purposes. If video could be taken during this point, you woudn't be able to see what you were capturing. Overall It is probably a combination of 2 things, the first is what I have listed above, the 2nd is probably the fact that DSLR's are considered more on the Professional side, therefore video isn't as important. The video quality achieved using a point and shoot camera is really sub-par. I am sure with all the technology they have today they could manufacture a DSLR which could take short video clips, but overall I don't think it is that important to most people in the class to purchase a DSLR.
    Ken
    Canon dSLR User

  4. #4
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    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktixx
    This is my personal opinion, so don't take it as The Word, but I am pretty sure they don't because DSLR's actually mimic film cameras. Basically what I am trying to say is that small point and shoot camera sensors are constantly "seeing" light. There is no physical shutter in front of the CCD, the manuf. consider it an "electronic" shutter. On some DSLR's there is a cleaning mode where the shutter and the aperature will open to their fullest, and the mirror will flip up, but this is primarily for cleaning purposes. If video could be taken during this point, you woudn't be able to see what you were capturing. Overall It is probably a combination of 2 things, the first is what I have listed above, the 2nd is probably the fact that DSLR's are considered more on the Professional side, therefore video isn't as important. The video quality achieved using a point and shoot camera is really sub-par. I am sure with all the technology they have today they could manufacture a DSLR which could take short video clips, but overall I don't think it is that important to most people in the class to purchase a DSLR.
    Ken

    What I'd like to see in a dSLR is what I get in a Canon S1 IS but with interchangable lenses, faster focussing and less modes. Plus a viewfinder grid that can be used to align the horizon (maybe an internal spirit level too).

  5. #5
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    Apr 2006
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    2

    why dslr's does'nt have video?

    ok, just my own opinion.! not quite sure, but i think it's because of the lens. i sell camera at a electronic retail store, and by playing with all the digital cameras (point and shoot) that has video on 'em, i noticed that you cant move neither of the zooms (optical or digital). -well actually you can set them before you record the video. and i think that is why dslr's doesnt have video on them, because you can move the lens manualy, unlike a pointshoot the camera's program prevents you to do that while recording the video. that is why i think dslr are'nt capable of capturing video (*coz the lens can be adjusted manualy and it is quite impossible to capture the lights to create a video). once again im not sure, but i just thought id share my opinion!
    but hey! look on the brightside! the technology is driving way too fast, so dont be suprised if dslr's with video shows up in two years! (looking forward to that!)

    * note that all digital camrecorder's lenses are not capable of manual movement rather by the camera programs. refer that difference between a manual lens (dslr) and zoom (optical and digital).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Des Plaines, IL
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    Mirror, mirror, on my rig...

    One of the funnier aspects of this discussion, that everyone seems to be missing about dSLRs, is the flippin' mirror.

    The only reason you can see THROUGH THE LENS(1) is because the mirror(2) reflects the image to the pentaprism(7) in the top of the camera, so you can see through the viewfinder (8) what you are shooting BEFORE you shoot it. As the photograph is taken... the mirror flips up (5), temporarily BLINDING the photographer, as the image goes to the shutter(3), which opens in front of the sensor(4) and allows the sensor to capture it.

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    If you were constantly in a 'movie mode', you would have no idea what you were seeing, because the mirror would always be in the "upright and locked position". In other words, no reflection to the viewfinder. The LCD does not allow you to view the image until it has been stored in the camera's temporary memory. That's why you can still see an image on your camera, even if you do not have a media card in the camera. Your image is in the small digital buffer (that temporary memory)... until you shoot another photograph or turn off the camera.

    The only camera I ever saw that allowed for pictures WITHOUT a moving mirror was the Canon F-1 High Speed Pellicle Mirror Camera.

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    The mirror was a fixed, semi-transparent surface which allowed for both the viewfinder and the film in the camera to see the image, simultaneously. Pellicle disadvantages are slightly degraded image quality since the pellicle is always in the optical path, loss of about 1/2 f/stop of light to the film since light is directed to the finder, a slightly dimmer finder since all the light is not directed to the finder for focusing, and difficulty keeping the pellicle clean since it attracts dust like a magnet (sounds like a sensor we all know and love, eh? ). Older pellicles, such as those in the Canon Pellix, have shown a tendency to yellow and separate.

    That was one expensive camera, believe me. I don't think the buying public would really spring for it, these days. They will buy their crappy little pocket digital movie cams... and like it.

    Why are point and shoots so popular? Because you don't even have to be interested in photography and will still get a relatively decent photograph of your toady and the gang.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by aaronl87
    ok, just my own opinion.! not quite sure, but i think it's because of the lens. i sell camera at a electronic retail store, and by playing with all the digital cameras (point and shoot) that has video on 'em, i noticed that you cant move neither of the zooms (optical or digital). -well actually you can set them before you record the video. and i think that is why dslr's doesnt have video on them
    That is just plain wrong. Get your hands on a Konica Minolta A200. It has manual zoom controls and it works just fine during "filming". The reason that dSLRs don't shoot video is that you would not be able to see what you were filming since the mirror would be up to allow light to get to the sensor.

    Take a look at a movie I shot last summer with my A200: About 2/3 through I zoom in with no problem. http://www.nilssons.dk/us/video/vand.htm
    Last edited by Coltess; 04-24-2006 at 11:21 PM.
    Colt
    KM 7D & A200

  8. #8
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    Feb 2006
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    Des Plaines, IL
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    Thumbs up Well said...

    Yes, very well said, Coltess. I kind of wish I had been that... to the point.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Houston, TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap
    Yes, very well said, Coltess. I kind of wish I had been that... to the point.
    Thanks!
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap
    The LCD does not allow you to view the image until it has been stored in the camera's temporary memory. That's why you can still see an image on your camera, even if you do not have a media card in the camera. Your image is in the small digital buffer (that temporary memory)... until you shoot another photograph or turn off the camera.
    That should be a fairly simple fix, unless the current sensors can't handle being on for extended periods of time for some reason, but I hadn't thought of the "dust sucking effect" of the sensor.
    It doesn't matter anyway. I get seasick just thinking about shooting video with a 300mm lens even with the AS on my 7D
    Colt
    KM 7D & A200

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    2,124
    Yes that is the exact reason. The sensors get very hot and produce increasing noise as exposure time goes with high levels of light.

    It's why the 20Da had live preview but required a cooldown period.

    Tim

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