Home News Buyers Guide About Advertising
 
 
 
   
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    686

    Photo printing quality method?

    Currently to print a photo:

    Save from camera to PC > load into GIMP and crop etc. > save as .png > print using photo setting on printer.

    I am looking to improve my print quality and for a random image from my hard drive the details are:

    Looking at the original photo RAW data when loaded into GIMP:
    Pixel dimensions: 4770 x 3178
    Resolution: 72x72ppi
    File size: 18.4MB
    Number of pixels: 15159060

    When saved as a png after cropping etc.:

    Pixel dimensions: 4536 x 2352
    Resolution: 72x72ppi
    File size: 5.9MB
    Number of pixels: 10668672

    I have found I can change the “Print resolution” within GIMP so could change the dpi from 72 to 300 before saving as a .png

    Pixel dimensions: 4536 x 2352
    Resolution: 300x300ppi
    File size in memory: 127.5MB
    Number of pixels: 10668672

    My printer is a Pixma iP4500 and “Print photos up to 9600x2400dpi” but may be getting some photos printed up online.

    Is this making the photo a better quality when printing if I save it again as a .png?

    What methods do you use ?
    Last edited by Anthony; 04-30-2010 at 02:40 PM. Reason: Spelling/grammer : (

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,153
    I'm not sure i get what you are asking...

    But Always, print at 300ppi. One can go lower when printing bigger, but small prints are always done at 300.

    I'm not familiar with the .png format, but i do know that .tiffs can be extremely good quality.

    And i do know that even with a Pro9000, Picture shot in Argb, i have a hard time telling the difference between a 16bit .tiff and a 8bit .jpg.

    So i don't know how much of a difference .png would make.

    What exactly is wrong with your current printed pictures that makes you question their quality ?

    The first thing to look at for pictures is generally what kind of Photo Paper you are using.
    Hey! Look its a shiny link! Click it!
    CasePhoto.ca

    Don't click this one, no seriously... Don't!
    The Mandatory Blog

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Terra Australis Incognita
    Posts
    3,877
    That change in file size is strange, was it the same image? File size in MB should be independent of your print resolution seting.
    D800, D300, D90, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200VR f2.8, 300 F4, 105 micro, 16-85VR, 50mm 1.8, Tammy 90 macro, 70-300VR, SB900, 2xSB600, MB-D10, 055XPROB 322RC2. New computers to run photoshop faster. C&C always appreciated. PhotoGallery
    Pressing the shutter is the start of the process - Joe McNally ... Buying the body is the start of the process - Dread Pirate

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    686
    I do not have any particular problems Csae but have not printed any large photos for a while now and wanted some tips before I got started and wasted any material.
    I have never tried to print a tiff file ( never even considered it ) and when I used to mess about with photos before, changing the resolution always change the image size and before I knew it I was back to the original resolution some how!

    I am "home alone" tomorrow and will try some tests and it looks like I will be using a good method.

    I think that was my fault Dread Pirate Roberts as it was getting late and I created a template 300dpi with a white background the same size as the photo and dropped the photo into it to see if it effected the photo dpi. I did not see the print size option until afterwards and as it was getting late I posted those results.

    This confused me:
    File size: 18.4MB
    Number of pixels: 15159060
    Number of pixels looks about right as I have a 15MB sensor but the file size is so large. Surley that can not all be EXIF data?
    Last edited by Anthony; 05-01-2010 at 02:38 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Terra Australis Incognita
    Posts
    3,877
    That looks a bout right for your 15MP sensor, probably in 16 bit uncompressed.

    It would be dramatically smaller eg between 1 to 2 MB as a jpeg. Jpeg size depends on your compression setting and what is in the scene. It doesn't save a value for every pixel but instead groups nearby pixels and calls them close enough to the same.

    Hence jpeg file size is dramatically smaller than TIFF or Raw (and from memory PNG).

    Google photo compression will explain better than me
    D800, D300, D90, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200VR f2.8, 300 F4, 105 micro, 16-85VR, 50mm 1.8, Tammy 90 macro, 70-300VR, SB900, 2xSB600, MB-D10, 055XPROB 322RC2. New computers to run photoshop faster. C&C always appreciated. PhotoGallery
    Pressing the shutter is the start of the process - Joe McNally ... Buying the body is the start of the process - Dread Pirate

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Terra Australis Incognita
    Posts
    3,877
    Forgot to mention print resolution doesn't affect file size. The file size is the number of pixels that are contained in the image. Print resolution is just a setting that says how close those dots should be placed together when you hit print.
    D800, D300, D90, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200VR f2.8, 300 F4, 105 micro, 16-85VR, 50mm 1.8, Tammy 90 macro, 70-300VR, SB900, 2xSB600, MB-D10, 055XPROB 322RC2. New computers to run photoshop faster. C&C always appreciated. PhotoGallery
    Pressing the shutter is the start of the process - Joe McNally ... Buying the body is the start of the process - Dread Pirate

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    686
    Print resolution is just a setting that says how close those dots should be placed together when you hit print.
    That probably explains why I was having problems a year or so ago - I was probably changing the print resolution, the size then changed so I resized the image and the the resolution was back to where I started !

    Anyway as I say if all goes well I will have a play with this tomorrow.

    I always have problems with printing - forgetting to change the paper size, ink running out etc. and CD writing - forgetting to close the CD or closing it by mistake to early

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    8,163
    Getting the best print quality is trial and error based on your skills, equipment, and expectations. You'll waste materials getting it right and there's really no way around that. Printing has a bit of a smudge factor inherent to laying ink to paper anyway, so I find that being overly critical isn't worth the gray hair.

    Having said that, I don't bother printing my own anymore. I use the best shooting technique I can and send Level 10 8bit JPEGs to my labs because that's what they recommend. None of my clients has expressed dissatisfaction so far. Heck I can't get them to think up a complaint even after prodding.
    Ouch.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,153
    The only time i really consider using .tiffs for printing is when i shoot something at iso 100-200, in the studio, or just a amazingly beautiful landscape that i want in 16bit

    AND, want to print it big.

    But again, most of the time you won't even notice the difference.
    Jpg 10 is fine, personally i just go to 12...

    I am not sure about Gimp, But Photoshop, has 3 image size settings.

    1x Resolution, something like 4000x3000 (Probably bigger)
    2x Image Size in measurements, 8x10 inches, or cm, or wtv
    3x DPI, usually 72 or 300, or wtv your default camera manufacturer sets it to.

    The three are related. a 700x600 72dpi image, will not print 8x10, like a 7000x6000 300dpi would.
    Last edited by Csae; 05-01-2010 at 09:40 AM.
    Hey! Look its a shiny link! Click it!
    CasePhoto.ca

    Don't click this one, no seriously... Don't!
    The Mandatory Blog

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Terra Australis Incognita
    Posts
    3,877
    Quote Originally Posted by Csae View Post

    The three are related. a 700x600 72dpi image, will not print 8x10, like a 7000x6000 300dpi would.
    Beg to differ, both would be 8*10 prints, it's just the 72 dpi version would like like Sh.. because you haven't crammed enough pixels close together to give a decent image.
    D800, D300, D90, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200VR f2.8, 300 F4, 105 micro, 16-85VR, 50mm 1.8, Tammy 90 macro, 70-300VR, SB900, 2xSB600, MB-D10, 055XPROB 322RC2. New computers to run photoshop faster. C&C always appreciated. PhotoGallery
    Pressing the shutter is the start of the process - Joe McNally ... Buying the body is the start of the process - Dread Pirate

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •