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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
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    Calling all Mac people

    I'm mightily fed up with Windows vCD and DVD writing software that never seems to work. The best I've had so far is ArcSoft which makes a nasty mess of all the images and Sonic which seems completely incapable of writing more than half a CD without complaining there's not enough space on the CD.

    I note that most graphics people seem to use Macs. Has anybody managed to write a complete vCD with a Mac and the iLife package?

    And what mac setup would you suggest is best for networking, use on the internet, photos, videos and general office stuff plus website development?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Virginia
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    752
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhys
    I'm mightily fed up with Windows vCD and DVD writing software that never seems to work. The best I've had so far is ArcSoft which makes a nasty mess of all the images and Sonic which seems completely incapable of writing more than half a CD without complaining there's not enough space on the CD.

    I note that most graphics people seem to use Macs. Has anybody managed to write a complete vCD with a Mac and the iLife package?

    And what mac setup would you suggest is best for networking, use on the internet, photos, videos and general office stuff plus website development?
    It's funny you post this, as I'm about to get a new 12-inch PowerBook G4 within the next few days From what I've read (which is a lot), it should handle all that type of work. If I like the PB enough, I may swap to a Mac desktop as well lol Check out forums.macnn.com , lots of valuable info on there.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hong Kong
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    107
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhys
    I'm mightily fed up with Windows vCD and DVD writing software that never seems to work. The best I've had so far is ArcSoft which makes a nasty mess of all the images and Sonic which seems completely incapable of writing more than half a CD without complaining there's not enough space on the CD.

    I note that most graphics people seem to use Macs. Has anybody managed to write a complete vCD with a Mac and the iLife package?

    And what mac setup would you suggest is best for networking, use on the internet, photos, videos and general office stuff plus website development?
    I have both Mac and PC at home and office. I don't write VCD, but DVD. DVD-R/DVD+R is so cheap now (about US$0.4 each) why don't we have a much, much better format? When using iLife, the iphoto is quite good, especially when it pairs with Photoshop Elements, it will be very powerful. ILife including a DVD editing software iDVD, it's quite good but the burn speed is very, very slow (you can put a blank DVDR in the drive and go to bed, it will be ready when you get up), I use DVD Studio Pro instead.

    I have both powerbook and desktop Mac, they are both G4. I think you can get a G5 with superdrive; there are many choices: G5, iMac G5 and Mac mini, you can check it up on the website: www. store.apple.com. All the 3 will be enough for photos and video, but remember to save some money to buy more RAM, especially for Video.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel Lo
    I have both Mac and PC at home and office. I don't write VCD, but DVD. DVD-R/DVD+R is so cheap now (about US$0.4 each) why don't we have a much, much better format? When using iLife, the iphoto is quite good, especially when it pairs with Photoshop Elements, it will be very powerful. ILife including a DVD editing software iDVD, it's quite good but the burn speed is very, very slow (you can put a blank DVDR in the drive and go to bed, it will be ready when you get up), I use DVD Studio Pro instead.

    I have both powerbook and desktop Mac, they are both G4. I think you can get a G5 with superdrive; there are many choices: G5, iMac G5 and Mac mini, you can check it up on the website: www. store.apple.com. All the 3 will be enough for photos and video, but remember to save some money to buy more RAM, especially for Video.
    vCD has the advantage in that it'll work in all DVD players wheras some will read DVD- and some DVD+ and some won't read DVD+/- at all.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    25
    I have a PowerMac G5 and it is great for making movies. If by vCD, you mean putting a movie on a CD, then yes, I have burned home movies on a CD using iMovie. The format is in Quicktime though. If you can accept Quicktime as your movie recording format, then yes, the Mac platform can make vCDs painlessly. The way you make movies on the Mac is so amazingly intuitive that it will shock you when you first try it.

    I personally think the Apple Macintosh platform is superior to MS Windows in graphic arts, video editing, and music, but that is my personal opinion from my personal experience. The G5 CPU is so much more efficient than any x86 in floating point calculations.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhys
    And what mac setup would you suggest is best for networking, use on the internet, photos, videos and general office stuff plus website development?
    I would definitely suggest a G5 if you are looking for a desktop. You might as well get the latest in processor speed and power, particularly for video and photo intensive tasks. The G5 iMacs are quite attractive, especially if you've got limited space. The G5 towers are huge, but I think most of those models come with dual processors - really for heavy duty pro applications. But if you're doing a lot of DVD work, give them a look. One other thing to check out - you may have better DVD writing options (speed, formats) with a 3rd party DVD burner, e.g. LaCie vs. the Apple Superdrive.

    Any Mac will be a breeze for networking (wired or wireless). Internet is a snap. The Mac arguably has a better selection of browsers available. And the iLife suite is great. I use iPhoto in conjunction with PS Elements - very easy. I've dabbled with iMovie a little, transferring some camcorder video to cd, but I'll wait until I get a DVD burner before I do any serious video burning.

    Check out the Apple Store or a site like MacMall. I've purchased two Macs from MacMall, both transactions went perfectly. And those places always throw in free RAM, etc.

    You can also check out sites like http://www.macintouch.com, http://www.macnn.com, or http://www.macobserver.com for news and product information.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
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    I'm very drawn to running the following setup:

    mini mac (1.25ghz) with lan link to a PC-based Linux server.

    I'm not sure whether the memory on the mini mac is the same as PC memory. If it is then it's a snap to add extra. I gather there are two slots.

    I'll be looking to include digital photos plus quick-time and avi format video files onto a vCD capable of being played in a standard DVD player on a TV.

    That's my main special requirement - something that so far PC-based software has been utterly useless at doing. Otherwise, I'll be using the computer to do the normal kinds of things including: stock control, email, web, web admin, word processing, printing photos etc.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhys
    I'm not sure whether the memory on the mini mac is the same as PC memory. If it is then it's a snap to add extra. I gather there are two slots.
    The Mac mini uses full-sized PC2700 (333MHz) DDR SDRAM. However there is only ONE slot, so get the max you can afford right from the start. You can take it to 1GB.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by pmnapier
    But if you're doing a lot of DVD work, give them a look. One other thing to check out - you may have better DVD writing options (speed, formats) with a 3rd party DVD burner, e.g. LaCie vs. the Apple Superdrive.
    Please note that iDVD only support internal DVDR drive, not external firewire one.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Northern Colorado, USA
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    2,225
    Rhys,

    Before switching to the most proprietary computer system made for the general public (like buying a camera with special lithium batteries, so that might get your attention), perhaps you should check out these links:

    vCD FAQ:
    http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Foru...dfaq.html#what

    GNU VCD Imager
    http://www.vcdimager.org/


    I have no interest in vCD, those links may help you, and save you the cost of a complete new system.

    Cheers,
    Eric

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