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Thread: ? for a230 user

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    If you don't want to price shop either of these are a safe bet Adorama or BH Photo.


    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    788
    Quote Originally Posted by sparkie1263 View Post
    If you don't want to price shop either of these are a safe bet Adorama or BH Photo.


    Frank
    He's right. They are generally going to be as cheap as anyone. I know in particular with Tamron and Sigma, BH, Adorama, or Amazon will be considerably cheaper than the two local shops we have local.

    However, if you have a good local camera store, it can be worthwhile to establish a relationship. We have two local shops in Raleigh, and it has been really useful to have someone to talk to when I am looking for stuff. Most of the guys are photographers themselves, and can give useful help on what to buy. They aren't always the nicest people, kinda cocky (it was the same way with guitar shops) but once you figure out how to deal with them, it is a huge help. However because of Sony's big corporation policies, most of the camera stores worth establishing a relationship with don't carry Sony. Typically anywhere big enough to carry Sony has such high turnover the employees don't know what they are talking about.

    Check around and see what you can find out.

    I echo that the 70-200 is a great lens, and is fine for an A230. There isn't anything wrong with the image quality of that camera as long as you are at low-mid ISO. The issues are more about build, bells and whistles, etc. There just aren't any bad DSLRs now.
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

    Gear List flickr

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    10
    After thinking about it for a few days, I decided to pass on the sony and will purchase the tamron. I couldn't stomach the 1K price difference. If I made a living off my pics, then sony it would be. Anyway, I will be testing this lens this weekend .

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,554

    Lightbulb A budget 70-200mm

    Initially, you will note a rather "tardy" focus response in low-light situations. I highly recommend going to manual focus (MF), if possible, to get your shot in a speedy way, under those conditions. The TAMRON SP AF 70-200mm f/2.8 Di LD will provide a beautiful image until normal conditions, outdoors.

    You may save a $1000 with this lens, but you will have to help it a bit to get the indoor images. I manually focus a lot of my glass, basically because it does not have any AF capability, so this is not a huge consideration on my part, but if you are an "AF-junky", it will be a consideration. If it is, return the TAMRON and up to the SONY.

    As with most any of the lenses, adding the "better" flash will help it AF.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    10
    I figure the lens and camera will weigh quite a bit. Can anyone suggest a sturdy and strong tripod that will hold my sony and tamron 70-200mm from tipping over. I also want to bring it with me when I travel on an airplane. Thanks again.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,554

    Lightbulb A tripod for Betsy

    Dad of 2wns,

    Personally, tripods are about as varied as you could possibly image. Everyone has their own preference ... and here one that I have found is both effective, light and sturdy, for on-the-go type people.

    There are those who disagree ... and I recommend you go to the camera shoppe and look these suggested "bad boys" up ... and just see for yourself.

    bogen-Manfrotto 190CXPRO3 (<- Click here) Tripod with a bogen-Manfrotto 486RC2 (<- Click here) Ball head w/ quick release plate

    Also, pick up a Manfrotto RC2 Compact Rapid Connect Adapter with 3157N Plate (<- Click here)

    This will be very handy when you want to quickly adapt another tripod or adapter-head for your RC2 plate on the bottom of your camera.

    Good luck with any other suggestions. I am often using what I suggest.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 01-30-2010 at 03:34 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    10
    Thanks Don. I actually looked at the 190xprob, 190cxpro3, 190cxpro4, and the 498rc2. What do you or anyone else think about the 322rc2 joystick?

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Ok, a tripod is going to last you a looong time so don't skimp on the purchase and have to replace it later.
    My #055 is 25+ years and still going strong (but heavy) so I also now have a lighter #055 CXPRO3 with a 488RC0 ball head.
    For me, I find the 190CXPRO3 to be a bit short.

    I've not tried the 322RC2 so can't really say that it won't be as good as the 498RC2 except that the latter should be more stable due to its' bigger ball. I don't see an advantage for still life so I'm guessing you think the grip will give you better results when "tracking" a subject. When I use a tripod and ball head (rather than a monopod) at the sports ground, I slack off the friction just enough to allow smooth tracking of the action and trigger when appropriate, I don't lock off the ball at all. It seems to work well enough.

    I do however find a Manfrotto 222 Joystick Head to be invaluable when fitted to my Monopod. The Monopod should always be at an angle and preferably, braced against your thigh, so you need some sort of ball head to level the camera. You also need to exert some downward pressure on the Monopod so the ball needs to be locked off before triggering and the 222 Joystick makes this easy. I think the 322 would be more awkward to use.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,554
    The grip-ball has been most effective on my monopod.

    I use the bogen - Manfrotto 3265RC2 Grip-ball head w/ quick release plate, but it may no longer be produced. I have had it for three years and like the way it controls the longer lenses, for, as Peter 'Peek' commented, "tracking" a subject. In the cases I use it ... it was aircraft, using the TAMRON 200-500mm f/5-6.3 lens.

    "Gotcha!"

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    I also use the monopod and grip as a quick light stand for my slave flash.

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    I have found that under normal tripod conditions, the pistol grip seems less advantageous, when you can use the much lighter ball-head devices. The monopod is, by its nature, relatively unstable until you supply the other two legs with your own. The quick-nature of the pistol grip makes a lot more sense in that case.

    Not so much with using a tripod. You can get the same overall utility out of the plain ball head device and since you have BOTH hands free to manipulate the camera and the adjustment lever, it seems a bit more intuitive and a lot smaller to operate. With the lightweight composite tripod, that is quite an asset for lugging the darn thing around.

    BTW: Here is an image showing the practical nature of having an RC2 adapter for quick use on another smaller tripod. Struggling to "unscrew" the tripod from your rig can often have a "surprise ending" as the heavy camera drops off the mount.

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    The adapter converts them right quick and maintains the RC2 practicality and with the subtle flip of a locking lever, the camera is yours! And not on the floor!
    Last edited by DonSchap; 01-31-2010 at 09:27 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    If not the same, similar.
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