Home News Buyers Guide About Advertising
 
 
 
   
Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst ... 45678 ... LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 94
  1. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    No specs yet on the A7xx but here's what you've all been waiting for, maybe

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Angry Delays, delays amd ... hurry up ... and continue to wait

    This SONY news release says the α7xx is a "concept camera", which probably means it is probably a proto-shell, under glass, with shining lights glaring at it ... at PMA. It cannot be demonstrated (ala α900). Wasn't that two-year experience awful? And to think, it was already a Minolta legacy (9D) design.

    Again, SONY, for all its cleverness, this is just another failure to produce the product on time, in my estimation. Nothing has been learned. They should have had the stores, at least in Anaheim, CA, outside the show, ready to sell this new α7xx model by now.




    I mean to Minolta, this would have been a major event and a "show stopper." Apparently, to SONY ... not so much. It is more like a "BTW."
    Last edited by DonSchap; 02-21-2010 at 12:29 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Lightbulb Not a worthy successor ... IMO

    Sure enough, from all the hoopla and images I had seen from PMA ... SONY is doing exactly what they initially did with the α900 ... all show, no go. For the price, the α900 was more than likely worth the wait. This new one ... not so much, unless that sensor's ISO is simply phenomenal.

    I mean, who knows when this will hit the shelves? Even the SONY reps are looking pretty lost ... as someone had the gall to call it a "concept" camera. Folks, the HD AVC-design was concept 1 1/2 years ago!

    "SOSDD" (Same Old ****, Different Day) ... that is all I can say. Instead of giving it the α7xx title, I would recommend the α6xx title be bestowed upon it and market it for the "Wedding Photographer."

    Please, leave the α700-series to a larger and more advanced and pro-sumer design ... for the true hobbyist. Is it just me, or are things pretty confusing?
    Last edited by DonSchap; 02-23-2010 at 04:10 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    326
    Please, leave the α700-series to a larger and more advanced and pro-sumer design ... for the true hobbyist. Is it just me, or are things pretty confusing?
    It's not you, Don. I don't think Sony knows what it wants to do when it grows up .
    That's why I'll be switching to Nikon in the next couple of weeks.

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Red face Move on out ... watch that door, eh?

    It is always good to make a big move early on. If you are not that deeply into any one manufacturer, "jumping ship" can actually be a lot of fun. You get the experience and excitement of using all the different and newest photographic interfaces ... and that, in its own right, is always beneficial. The educational aspects to this abound, of course.

    I know my own stint with Canon gave me valuable insight on how to evaluate and choose lenses. Even common third party lenses change their performance aspects when mounted on different manufacturers cameras. TAMRONs tend to work better on the SONYs and the SIGMA seems to lend itself more toward Canon.

    Once you do dig in, though, swapping over equipment can be tedious as heck and very deflating. I know, even with my film cameras, having a dozen or so unused lenses was very disheartening when Minolta closed its doors. The growth curve in my photography looked kind of bleak and I simply had no choice, in the interim, but to choose another manufacturer, to get into digital. I appreciated when SONY pulled Minolta's respective "tail" out of the wringer, but the support and continuity has been, indeed especially challenging and rather lackluster. I truly believe that SONY should have moved a whole lot quicker, than sitting back to watch Minolta "twist in the wind" for its final year, as it were, looking for a "sweetheart deal" of a buy out.

    What they eventually got was about 65% of the old company and the loss of a lot of spare parts, costing people significant money when they went to have warranty repairs done on their lenses.

    Instead of reinventing the Minolta-engineered camera, I still believe SONY would have been much better off trying desperately to keep the mainstays of the Minolta in the forefront of their design and engineering, instead of trying so hard to marry their P&S and video lines to the Minolta DLSRs.

    Obviously, someone wants the glory that is not really theirs and probably never will be.

    Good luck with you migration, 'JR' ... and get the good stuff, while the rest of us will remained rather confused watching SONY to continue to try and reinvent the wheel.

    I just don't MAKE.BELIEVE it.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 02-23-2010 at 10:28 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
    Posts
    10,424
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    Instead of reinventing the Minolta-engineered camera, I still believe SONY would have been much better off trying desperately to keep the mainstays of the Minolta in the forefront of their design and engineering, instead of trying so hard to marry their P&S and video lines to the Minolta DLSRs.
    and in a nutshell...this is so true. dslr was always going to be a niche for sony...never a big player in their corporate sales. so why not keep that niche much more aligned to a premium optical product based on minolta rather than churn out model after model of mediocrity ?

    i truly dont get it. maybe theres something on the horizon we dont know about...
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Thumbs down Get rid of the itch ...

    It is maddening, considering all the trouble that SONY Corporate apparently went to, to get Carl Zeiss contracting for several thousand each of SONY-only high-end optics. It was all they could do to point and say they had "Zeiss" glass for their new line of cameras. I can just see all the younger people marrying those high-end, superior lenses to $300 el cheapo camera bodies?

    Geez Louise, someone is really going soft in the ol' numb skull, thinking that might or would happen.

    Hey, I have an idea. Let's run the scenario:

    SONY DSLR Newbie: "Hi! I just bought an α200 (which costs less than a good CP-filter) ... and I want to hang a high-end optic like a CZ 135mm f/1.8 lens on it. I saw that my local SONY Style does NOT carry any lenses costing more than $700 ... so, where can I run out to in order to get this awesome optical combo for a good price?"

    Veteran SONY DSLR owner: "Well, Virgina ... Santa Claus is out of town for the next few months, so ... while the α200 is no longer in production, in preference to the new, gee-whiz α230 (<- now, that was another one of those awesome "+30" downgrades ) ... that's why they are just about giving the α200 away, the CZ 135mm f/1.8 cost remains to be about $1500 and the B+W Kaesemann CP-filter for it from B&H is $266. Can I ask 'why' you wou would ever consider using such a premium lens on SONYs lowest-end DSLR camera? There is simply no way the α200 could make full use of such a terrific lens like that."

    Same lame old and rather typical response from a newbie: "Because the INTRO camera was all I could afford. Now, where is that high-end, Carl Zeiss lens? I just gotsta have it! Lens envy hits quick when all you have is a 'kit' toy lens."

    Yep! This is a highly likely day-in-the-life of a new DSLR owner. Close your eyes ... and you can almost see it happen. NOT!

    Moral of the story: Beware corporate takeovers, when the buyer has no interest in the success of the company they unfortunately got their hands on.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 02-24-2010 at 12:17 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    326
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    It is maddening, considering all the trouble that SONY Corporate apparently went to, to get Carl Zeiss contracting for several thousand each of SONY-only high-end optics. It was all they could do to point and say they had "Zeiss" glass for their new line of cameras. I can just see all the younger people marrying those high-end, superior lenses to $300 el cheapo camera bodies?
    Moral of the story: Beware corporate takeovers, when the buyer has no interest in the success of the company they unfortunately got their hands on.
    I don't know why they bought Minolta's camera division.
    Seriously, I really thought/wanted Sony to get in there and kick some butt. Maybe it's because I worked for them what seems like a lifetime ago. But, if I had to guess I'd say they wasted a lot of time fighting between the DSLR and Video divisions -- video probably didn't just want to "share" technology, and nobody higher up was making them, so here we are, still waiting for video...(not that I really care to have video on a DSLR), because the higher ups don't see an immediate return on investment...and it will end up hurting the very video division they think they are protecting.

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    788
    I expect the turn around on this gear to be more like the 2009 PMA.

    Of course the 2009 PMA was the last straw for me before switching.

    But the lenses shown at 2009 PMA (28-75, 18-55SAM and 55-200SAM) came out fairly soon. I think the DT lenses were out around May, so 3 months. I expect we will see the A700 successor by early summer.

    Additionally, last year they only showed some of what was coming, they didn't show the +30 bodies (sorry as they are) or the A850 or A450-550 series. So I expect we will see more this year than just the few things shown at PMA.

    I think Sony still has one of the best offerings for entry level, and A700, A850, A900 and autofocus CZ primes and f/2.8 zooms are really nice. The real problem is in between. The A700 is long in the tooth, and if you want very good quality glass, but don't want to pro glass, you end up going third party.

    Like the others here, I just don't know what they are doing. I don't think they are currently planning on just shutting down the DSLR business, there is too much movement for that. I have even wondered if they are going to only focus on the low end, but with a new 24mm coming out, along with the recent A850, and showing the A7xx this week, it seems like high end stuff is going to keep going.

    My only thought at this point is that they do not want to pioneer. They want to see what is successful in the market before committing to anything. They saw the success of EVIL cameras last year, so a new one is coming out. They wanted to see the D300s and 7D before releasing the follow up to the A700, but it has really been way too long.

    I wonder what the future holds. I wouldn't be shocked if 2 years from now either Pentax went out, or either Sony or Olympus quit making cameras with mirrors. I don't think mirror-less cameras will replace SLRs completely, at least for some time. The benefit to mirror-less is size, and if you set a Nikon F and a Nikon D3 beside each other, you will see that cameras have been getting bigger, not smaller, for the last 50 years.
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

    Gear List flickr

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Question So ... where's the real camera?

    To be practical, the camera w/o a mirror box to worry about could be almost any shape that a lens will fit on. Ergonomically, they could develop a radically new approach and offer stereoscopic binocular imaging or that 3-D idea, in a whole new package.

    Think about it: If you truly had live-view going, you could almost wear a pair of "shutter glasses" and use them to direct your imaging, without ever bringing the camera to your funny-lookin' mug. You could have a "wireless-tether", as it were, transmitting pictures straight to a hard drive, doing all the control changing locally, while your lens is off somewhere else.

    I mean we are on the cusp and they seem to be stuck with the idea of always placing the camera at your eye. It was not and still is not required. Many medium format photographers still use waist-level camera, with flip up viewfinders. They are certainly not eye-level. Call it the "belly-shot", if you will. If you can see it, you can snap it. Just take the viewer with you, the rest of the hardware can remain "virtually" on-site.

    Wherever the lens is located is, now, the real aspect we should be concerned with, because your 'human' body does not need to be behind the camera any more (born out by my personal attempts at REMOTE USB-DSLR camera project, last year). It is just the method you use to get the lens in position, be you ... another person ... or, perhaps, a mobile "robot."

    Just think of the possibilities that the "Paparazzi" would/could have, no longer having to hunt down celebrities for their images. They could set up a virtual "trap" of portable/wireless network of "remote" high-end lenses/sensors and just annihilate any sense of privacy the celebrity currently might be enjoying, at home or on vacation, due to anti-human physical security. Those days will vanish.

    The fact is that almost every waking moment, outside your home, is being "observed" by some kind of video camera system operated by god-knows-who, almost everywhere, in an urban environment. You cannot walk five feet without something "detecting" it ... and the infamous they are always adding more and more sensors. Better get use to it.

    Heck, there's even an ongoing investigation where people at a school were turning on remote laptop cameras and observing students in the privacy of their own homes! I mean, c'mon!

    Some folks may wave this off, saying, "Those are your own dark thoughts, Don." I have news for you ... this network of public viewing cameras has been actively going on since ATMS were installed, my friends. How long has that been? Yeah, almost thirty+ years. When the remote teller became a reality, the virtual shift was in effect. They have made a lot more and better cameras since then ... and they are installing them ... EVERYWHERE! So "Smile, you're on Candid Camera."

    Another major shift recently took place when the Federal Government "cleared" the entire VHF/UHF bandwidth for televisions and shoved everyone, involuntarily and at your cost, to digital-interfaced and encrypted TV, requiring those stupid interfaces. Yeah ... "central control" has other plans for this frequency range and you, my friend, are not invited.

    I see it as an exciting time to be a photographer (look at all of the "unknown" competition you have to get the shot first) ... but, I have to say, a little more cooperation between the manufacturers and us "laboratory rats" (with all the money) might be nice.

    If you are not intrigued by the latest goings on, then you, dear friend, are living under a virtual rock. They will find you ... more than likely, they already have and are watching every move. I'm just sayin' ...
    Last edited by DonSchap; 02-24-2010 at 08:18 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •