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  1. #21
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    Frank, 3 EV is quite a big range and more than adequate for most (I almost said all) situations. Of course, you need to be aware of the overall lighting and use the VF (and AE Lock button) to isolate the appropriate area for metering excluding very bright or very dark areas which are not part of the subject. Apart from when using a Macro lens or Tubes, I really can't think of an occasion when 3 EV compensation was not sufficient.
    Last edited by Peekayoh; 11-16-2009 at 05:57 PM. Reason: typo

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    2,562
    [QUOTE=Peekayoh;398058]Frank, 3 EV is quite a big range and more than adequate for most (I almost said all) situations. Of course, you need to be aware of the overall lighting and use the VF (and AE Lock button) to isolate the appropriate area for metering excluding very bright or very dark areas which are not part of the subject. Apart from when using a Macro lens or Tubes, I really can't think of an accasion when 3 EV compensation was not sufficient.[/QUOTE


    I have a hard time shooting birds with bright sky behind them. I understand what you are saying. I use my histogram to help keep me where I need to be. I think that is the most important thing to remember to check and correct.

    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  3. #23
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    Nov 2008
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    Small birds, bright sky, a situation where you can't meter selectively. So it's experience with a bit of educated guesswork.
    For this one I compensated by +1 EV.
    After the event I wish I had gone for +1.5EV but the moment had passed. Still it didn't need the +3 available.
    Name:  96 Martins 3308.jpg
Views: 127
Size:  163.4 KB

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Chicago, IL USA
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    935
    Quote Originally Posted by Peekayoh View Post
    Small birds, bright sky, a situation where you can't meter selectively. So it's experience with a bit of educated guesswork.
    For this one I compensated by +1 EV.
    After the event I wish I had gone for +1.5EV but the moment had passed. Still it didn't need the +3 available.
    Name:  96 Martins 3308.jpg
Views: 127
Size:  163.4 KB
    Does the Sony have spot metering, or center-weighted metering? You can use that on your subject to get proper metering. You probably wouldn't need all that exposure compensation with those different metering modes.
    Nikon D300 | MB-D10 | Nikkor 12-24/4 | Nikkor 50/1.8 | Nikkor 70-200/2.8 VRI | Sigma 18-50/2.8 | SB-800 | SB-80DX (x4) | Radiopopper JrX Studio |

  5. #25
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    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
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    Yes it does have Spot, Center Weighted and Matrix.
    Canon EOS 7D

    flickr
    FLUIDR

  6. #26
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    Nov 2008
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    Yes, it was spot metered, but small birds at distance occupying a small part of the frame; you still need to give the meter a helping hand.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
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    788
    I think Frank makes a good point, although for a limited case. If that bird gets a hair out of the spot while you are tracking it, your exposure is going to shift. I can see manual being useful in that case. Ideally you would get them in the spot, lock exposure, then continue.
    Jason Hamilton
    Selective Frame

    EOS 5D - Canon EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 35 f/2, EF 50mm f/1.8 Mk II, EF 70-210 f/3.5-4.5 USM, EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro, Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 (with EOS adapter), 430EX, Canon S90
    Nikon FE - Nikkor 35mm f/2 AI'd, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI, Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AI, F to EF adapter, 2xVivitar 285, other lighting stuff
    Mamiya C220 - 80mm f/2.8

    Gear List flickr

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    2,562
    Quote Originally Posted by laydros View Post
    I think Frank makes a good point, although for a limited case. If that bird gets a hair out of the spot while you are tracking it, your exposure is going to shift. I can see manual being useful in that case. Ideally you would get them in the spot, lock exposure, then continue.
    Jason

    What I do is take a shot in A mode then see where I am on the exposure then switch to M and compensate to get the right exposure so it don't change while I am shooting that bird.

    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Interesting solution Frank. Try this...

    In (A) mode aim the camera at the subject,
    Press the AEL button to hold the exposure and then
    Use the exposure compensation button to adjust exposure.

    I find it helps to have the AEL button in "Toggle" mode.

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