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  1. #731
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
    Posts
    10,424
    some interesting questions in there. alot of pretty redundant ones though. eg: Q5 and 6...wtf ?
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  2. #732
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Lightbulb Explain yourself!

    I have rather disappointed with the inability of my fellow senior-level students to be able to answer these rather typical questions. As an older professional, I find it rather unworthy of a "degree-holder" not to know these rather common and normal use points of knowledge.

    As to the test:

    EDIT: I have added reference illustrations to Question 1.

    With number 5, this is a correlation question between the number of pixels in a sensor and the overall resolution. The "indirect correlation" means the less the number of pixels, the better the resolution. "Direct correlation" is vice-versa. "Does not matter" means... oh, who cares... and "Huh?" means... well, huh? (Hint: The last two answers are not going to make you a star.)

    With number 6, I have edited and renumbered all the the questions. The table is now questions 6 thru 12 and made a visual correction that may help in clarifying the question. With standard text, it is hard to space things without those silly periods and spaces. There are now 52 questions. The essay questions are worth considerable more than the multiple guess ones.

    Does that help?

    BTW: I wrote the test to kind of help you through the "fuzzy" parts by asking questions several ways. Again, it is just a trial balloon.

    @ Rooz: Thank you for pointing out the awkwardness of the presentation.

    @ Peter: take two aspirin and call someone else in the morning. Yeah, there is a lot in there... we just do not think about it much.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 09-27-2011 at 06:19 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #733
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Thumbs up Summer Quarter ends...

    Well, two "A"s and a "B" for this quarter. School was nowhere near as intricate to navigate as real ife was, this time. The rains, the flooding, the interior alterations to the house... what a mess.

    Anyway, the Fall Quarter starts on Monday and lasts until the second week of December. Three classes: Specialization, Portfolio Preparation and Art Direction.

    I have to come up with two specialties to cover the required material. I am leaning toward Aircraft Photography & Fashion (maybe Wedding - gasp!). More on that, later. I have a trip to Oshkosh, WI (EAA Museum) (160-miles away) & to Dayton, Ohio (Air Force Museum) (480-miles away) to start off with some decent material. This time, I am bringing ALL the lights (exhausting) to illuminate a bit better and augment the huge overhead lamps they already have in place, in the hangars, I hope.

    I need to get these shoots in before the weather really takes a dump.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  4. #734
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    602

    Taking time to make it count!

    I'm now about five weeks into my large format photography class. The professor has it set up to reflect some of the realities of modern day photography - digital is prevalent even if you are shooting analog (film) because film will invariably be scanned to digital for ease of reproduction. So, although we are shooting 4x5" film negatives, the assignments include digitally scanned proof sheets, traditional photographic prints via the darkroom and digitally scanned, edited and printed prints.

    Here are some of my preliminary shots:
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    Queen Mary Promenade -
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    Cruise Ship Preparing for Departure at Long Beach

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    Proof Sheet - This shows some of the inherent risks and problems with sheet film processing. On the top left, the air vent on the school's negative drying cabinet blew a nice stream of hot air across the negative melting the emulsion. The upper right negative was also effected, but not as much. I also found that the sheet hangers used in the dip processing tend to not allow enough of the developer to reach the edges of the sheets where the negatives come into contact with the holders. Live and learn.

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    Proof Sheet - the beginning of this semester's final portfolio, a photo essay of the State Route 94 corridor in San Diego County.
    Darin Wessel
    α 900
    Zooms: Tamron SP AF70-200mm f2.8 Di LD Macro; Sigma 28-90mm D macro, Konica-Minolta 18-70 f3.5-5.6
    Primes: Minolta 28mm f2.8; Sony 50mm f1.4
    Minolta RC-1000 remote commander

    Film:
    Calumet Cambo CC400 4x5 View Camera
    YashikaMat 6x6 TLR (other accessories)
    Minolta Maxxum 7000 w/ Minolta 35-80mm f/4-5.6 & Minolta 2800 flash
    Minolta Maxxum 5000i & Vivitar 728 AFM flash
    What's next???

  5. #735
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    602

    Cool Taking your time.

    In my last post, I meant to say that shooting large format gives an appreciation for making your shot count as opposed to those who simply shoot rapid fire with their DSLRs and hope something good comes of it. Taking your time not only means the camera settings you chose, but the composition of your shot, how the lines work in your composition, how your choices in camera settings will impact the outcome and when you actually push the shutter. Do you want extreme depth of sharpness throughout your image or do you want a shallow DOF to emphasize a particular subject/mood. If you're taking someone's portrait, do you let them give you the image they want to portray or do you work to break down the veneer most people put up to get a mood or likeness of a person that you as the photographer want.

    With all of that said, the one true benefit of a digital DSLR is the ability to truly explore a subject with multiple vantage points and compositional selections without the cost and delay of doing it with film. Then, when you find a composition that works, take your time to concentrate on that image and your choices of getting the best in-camera shot possible.

    So, here's a little look behind the large format camera scene of one of my portrait shots ...

    The set-up -
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    The view -
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    Darin Wessel
    α 900
    Zooms: Tamron SP AF70-200mm f2.8 Di LD Macro; Sigma 28-90mm D macro, Konica-Minolta 18-70 f3.5-5.6
    Primes: Minolta 28mm f2.8; Sony 50mm f1.4
    Minolta RC-1000 remote commander

    Film:
    Calumet Cambo CC400 4x5 View Camera
    YashikaMat 6x6 TLR (other accessories)
    Minolta Maxxum 7000 w/ Minolta 35-80mm f/4-5.6 & Minolta 2800 flash
    Minolta Maxxum 5000i & Vivitar 728 AFM flash
    What's next???

  6. #736
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Thumbs up Taking Flight

    Today I took a trip up to the EAA Museum, in Oshkosh.

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    To be honest, as attractive as the building is, it is totally sedate to what is enclosed inside. Some very enthusiastic and interesting people got together and created a true "monument to aviation" within this place, on the order of the Smithsonian-level of curating. In fact, with the "Pioneer Field" exhibit, it exceeds the level most impressively, because you "get to fly!" How cool is that?

    Anyway, most of the exhibits are static in nature, but definitely done with excellent vision and some good nature, too.

    In my next few weeks of Specialization, I am going to attempt to capture some of this effort, as best I can. I have been cleared to light as I wish, which is a lot of work, but what I find most impressive, is that they have provided considerable light, also, indoors. Again, it is geared for human eyesight, not photography, which demands at least 2 more f-stops.

    Here was zoom experiment I played with today... and it gave me something to think about for a future shot.

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    Which came from this organized ceiling art...

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    These are actual life-sized aircraft, in hammerhead stalls. It makes for an interesting front gallery. I shot it with the SIGMA Ultra Wide-Angle zoom, mounted on a tripod, on the floor, at about 3-foot height... triggered with an electronic release.

    I also got myself airborne... in an old Ford Tri-Motor (build 1929)... and flew around Oshkosh, in the right seat (only open window), aside the pilot, to check out the Autumn color explosion... or what was left of it. THey had some serious wind, only days ago. I hung the α850 out the window, with the 24-70 on it. There one house that caught my eye, as we sailed over it, at 1000 feet up.

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    Then again, some had major league swimmin' holes attached to their property.

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    But, I have to say, probably the weirdest thing I saw, today, was the Oshkosh Airport lined from one end of the runway to the other with these military sand-colored trucks. Look close... they are everywhere. It looked like a "valet-nighmare." (see crop)

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    CROP
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    Using a couple of C-5s or C-17s... this could be the start of a major invasion, huh?

    I also got to try an airborne (while moving - I let the plane change the aspect and also repositioning the camera) 7-panel panorama. It was kind of a neat shot.

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    Then as were turning back towards the airport, the pilot nudges me and directs my attention back out of the window, as a plane sails under us no more than 500 feet away! I raised the camera and shot 'em!

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    CROP
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    I have to admit, this photography "Specialty" is a lot more (okay, prepare yourself... I am going to use the "F"-word, which every S.O. seems to hate)...

    "FUN" (<- there, I said it ) As in: "What do mean you had FUN? How dare you! I'll tell when you are having fun, buster."

    Yes, this may be more FUN than I thought it was going to be, this quarter (there, I said it, again).
    Last edited by DonSchap; 10-12-2011 at 12:57 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  7. #737
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Lightbulb Just in case...

    And just in case you were not around in 1929 when these planes revolutionized passenger travel and don't know what the heck a Ford Tri-motor looks like, well... it's not a 747. It is a serious uphill climb to get to the cockpit.

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    This was just before take-off. Don't you just hate when there are no clouds in the sky??? Me, too...

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    Let's see what's up there...

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    I mean, talk about almost "kissing" the prop. The prop-wash actually sucked half of my camera strap out the right window, with my cell phone tucked in it. Obviously, that was a little nerve-wracking, so I reeled them back in and tucked it tight. There is not a lot of room in that cockpit, especially when you are my size. As I had figured, last quarter, in conceiving an aerial photography project, the use of multiple lenses is an enormous chore, so I stuck with the 24-70 zoom and made the best of it, as the 70-400 sat on the floor, enjoying the ride. I mean, forget the camera bag... it went as luggage.

    And I have to say, the mental overhead is a lot less with this plane, especially considering it has three engines... and this control panel. There is a lot to be said for keeping it simple. In fact, the plane will successfully fly with a combination of any two engines working. Call it: "flying with a spare."

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    Then, it was stunning to lift from the ground at only 60-mph. Big wings are great. But, then to find out the max cruise speed of this plane was only 90-mph. No hurry, right? When you are taking images, speed is rarely something you are looking for. Heck, a blimp might be even handier.

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    In a minute or two, we were over the town and I felt the fall colors were quite apparent. In another week, probably not so much.

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    Nope, you do not get this out of a trip to the Smithsonian.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 10-09-2011 at 10:43 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  8. #738
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Thumbs up What would a trip to an aircraft museum be without...

    the first successful powered flight vehicle?

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    But, the one aircraft that touched my heart was "Air-Cam" (<- click here)

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    This was the EAA contribution that made it all worthwhile, in my opinion. My next camera!

    Hey Frank, you want to rear-seat this baby? Talk about bird-shots, eh?
    Last edited by DonSchap; 10-09-2011 at 11:32 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #739
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Lightbulb Art Direction

    The Art Direction class is geared more toward Graphic Design than it is Photography. It is like a giant class project, resulting in an eventual show of all the work produced. Each student is responsible to successfully produce a container box and two 16-page booklets and a third piece of work, developed by them. It can use existing technology to present it (if necessary), but it has to be an original and salable piece of work. Personally, this part can be the worst for the photographers. We rarely come up with original concepts, but usually photograph what ALREADY exists.

    Photography is more of an element to the whole shebang, as the four photographers in this particular class are responsible for producing images of all the final projects and some of their development for inclusion into a "Show Catalog." I wound up scheduling 7-weeks of studio time, to have a predictable place to do these projects in. Also, the group shot of all the participants has to be done for the same reason.

    Overall, the concept of the class is not quite what I had assumed it would be, but then again, I have to remember that in this modern world, things are constantly changing. No one solution lasts for long.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 10-11-2011 at 11:39 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  10. #740
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Lightbulb Planes & Trains

    Judging from the rather solid reception I got with my preview submissions from the EAA Museum, I have decided to go with another suggestion that was given to me for the "second project" in the Specialization course. That being the Illinois Railway Museum, in Union, IL. The big advantage of this delightful locale is the proximity to me, being only 40 miles away. I figure I can shoot the day without having to dedicate the Chicago-to-Oshkosh 5-6 hours of round-trip driving, too.

    I shot this particular location many years ago, with film, as a project for my Photography Certificate, in Tri-X and Color. Since that time, the museum has been improved and a number of locomotives have been restored. I do recall the train barns, back then, being full of decommissioned, rusty carriages and engines. Again, as always, one of the larger challenges is the broad & SUFFICIENT lighting.

    We shall see what we shall see... and this definitely will shift the overall contents of my portfolio.

    Along those lines, it is kind of funny, but I have not met many photography students that really want to be hemmed into specializations. Many are quite comfortable with being generalists. I can definitely relate. But, I also understand the issues with submitting baby and cutey images, in your portfolio, when you are trying to get an architecture gig.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 10-12-2011 at 12:55 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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