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  1. #181
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Chicago, IL USA
    Posts
    935
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    When it got to the 50mm, the facial features ... uh, let's just say if you showed these to a woman, you would probably be lucky if she didn't take the camera and beat you with it.
    It is really quite strange how a 50mm lens looks like a wide angle on FF. I think this whole crop sensor digital stuff made people forget what a true 50mm looks like.

    50mm on crop can be a head and shoulder shot, 50mm on ff is a half body lens.
    Nikon D300 | MB-D10 | Nikkor 12-24/4 | Nikkor 50/1.8 | Nikkor 70-200/2.8 VRI | Sigma 18-50/2.8 | SB-800 | SB-80DX (x4) | Radiopopper JrX Studio |

  2. #182
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Exclamation Printer "Gamut" issues ...

    Okay ... so I did a shoot at the school studio, trying some lighting effects ...

    The model actually came up with this one, so, hey, what the heck?
    Name:  Heart-Illumination.jpg
Views: 478
Size:  169.9 KB
    EXIF: SONY α850 w/ Rokinon (Samyang) MF 85mm f/1.4
    @ f/1.4 - 1 sec. - ISO-200 - Spot Meter - Tungsten - M Mode - +2 step


    I had to admit, it was pretty neat.

    Then you push it, right?

    Name:  HL-curved.jpg
Views: 257
Size:  276.8 KB
    Last edited by DonSchap; 06-04-2010 at 06:32 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #183
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    I like it.
    Hole in the heart?

  4. #184
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    602
    Makes me think of the 60's, in a good way.
    Darin Wessel
    α 900
    Zooms: Tamron SP AF70-200mm f2.8 Di LD Macro; Sigma 28-90mm D macro, Konica-Minolta 18-70 f3.5-5.6
    Primes: Minolta 28mm f2.8; Sony 50mm f1.4
    Minolta RC-1000 remote commander

    Film:
    Calumet Cambo CC400 4x5 View Camera
    YashikaMat 6x6 TLR (other accessories)
    Minolta Maxxum 7000 w/ Minolta 35-80mm f/4-5.6 & Minolta 2800 flash
    Minolta Maxxum 5000i & Vivitar 728 AFM flash
    What's next???

  5. #185
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Smile Studio Work for the project

    Wednesday's shoot turned out some rather nice items, using the new SIGMA AF 24-70mm f/2.8 DG EX IF HSM I received earlier that day. I was anxious to try it out, so I turned out these couple shots.

    Name:  lauren-chks-window.jpg
Views: 310
Size:  213.7 KB
    α850 w/ SIGMA AF 24-70mm f/2.8 DG EX IF HSM
    @ 45mm - f/3.5 - 1/20 sec. - ISO-800 - Spot meter - Tungsten - M Mode


    Name:  simpler-days.jpg
Views: 260
Size:  253.2 KB
    α850 w/ SIGMA AF 24-70mm f/2.8 DG EX IF HSM
    @ 45mm - f/3.5 - 1/20 sec. - ISO-800 - Spot meter - Tungsten - M Mode



    Name:  Life-is-a-Cabaret.jpg
Views: 296
Size:  564.7 KB
    α850 w/ SIGMA AF 24-70mm f/2.8 DG EX IF HSM
    @ 55mm - f/6.3 - 1/6 sec. - ISO-800 - Spot meter - Tungsten - M Mode


    Okay, so it is not a family portrait, but it has character. I'm sorry, but did the SONY DSLR forum just get a little more ... interesting? I thought I noticed "steam" coming from my camera.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 06-04-2010 at 06:29 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  6. #186
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Don, I think the lightning needed to be moved on the first two. It should have been more to the front of you beautiful model. I see a lot of shadows on her shoulder and leg. Then again what do I know about lightning I can never get it right.

    Frank
    Last edited by sparkie1263; 05-29-2010 at 05:08 AM.
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  7. #187
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Red face A problem with "studio time" in a school

    (the following is called: "Getting inside Don's head")

    One of the biggest issues with the "studio time" I was allocated was ... there is not enough of it, in the school, with all of the other students contending for the one space. I had four hours to set up my own lights (meaning I had to drag in all my own lights, light stands and whatnot ... do the schedule of shots and then break it all back down and get it all the heck out. It may seem like a lot of time, but when I actually "timed" it, it took about 30-40 minutes to put it up ... and 45 minutes to repack it ... and I did not even use it all! I am finding that those four total hours disappear at a fantastic rate, as you do this. Right there, 1-1/2 hours, lost to basic setup, alone.

    The real answer may just lie in renting some kind of ad hoc studio space for a weekend and just try to get it done, there. Again, it is not free (or as part of the cost of admission)... and I pay through the nose to go to this school, believe me. I do not want to paint this with a broad brush, but judging from some of the response and work I have heard and seen ... I have to opine that your "basic student" is probably no where nearly as concerned about what they get or with what.

    I know I packed a lot of things into that short time ... ran overtime, no less, and STILL did not get everything I wanted from it.
    -> One thing I am sure of, Frank, I was flat exhausted, afterward. I know I am not going to get a lot of sympathy from the wedding crowd, but when you think of it, that is really, composition-wise, similar from wedding to wedding. Also, people are not as critical of lighting, because is is pretty much "as you get them", unless you can coax them into a lighting tent or pre-lit area.

    Anyway ... concerning the overall lighting of this ... I did not take time to add in the better "reviewing capabilities" (PC or video monitor) to my DSLR that I probably should have. Obviously, I seem to have needed it to make "optimum" lighting decisions. I kind of knew where I wanted to go with the model's positioning, but being pretty much solo for everything concerning lighting placement and then running back and forth, back and forth behind the camera and making lighting corrections... well, it kind of wears a body out. So, I apologize for the less than "optimal" results, as I pushed it. I can see why these fashion guys have lighting staff. YOU REALLY NEED THEM! Do not kid yourself.

    One aspect I seem to keep encountering, is the novelty of some of these shoots. A lot of them I simply have never done before, hence the learning aspect of it all. Not only my learning, but also the model, appreciating the time to re-shape the lighting environment and having the patience to continue. I find many young people are so wrapped up in catering to their incredibly busy "social lives" on these hand held devices, they really do not give the 100% to the shoot, as it goes on, being tormented by outside influences and lacking .. ahem, FOCUS.

    Remember when you had to "find a phone" when you needed to make a call? Remember how "it could wait"? Today, it is a "texting duel." Go ahead, tell me I'm wrong. Oh, for those quieter days, again.

    I digress ... if you have a "sitting portrait" scenario ... that is a whole lot simpler than lighting an entire 10-foot by 10-foot stage, where the model is assuming all sorts of curious positions (standing, sitting, kneeling, lying prone). Even the background illumination is changing in dimension, also. I mean, that's when the real work begins, as we should know and often do not think about, not just behind the viewfinder. Another consideration, which I will have to address, it the serious lack of circulation in that particular room. It is in the center of the entire building and connected to the standard room circulation system. It is painted black and gray, so I wound up using the adjustable modeling lamps of my strobes, because the hot lights were just too overwhelming, without being able to properly draw off the extreme generated heat from them.

    You know, for a "quasi-professional" level of support, this is not all the great. It's like ... "half-baked." At least that's the way I feel, when I'm done. Like an Idaho-potato at 325F ... sorry ... (as I take off my shirt and wring it out)

    If I had only one or two lighting scenarios (settings), I may have gotten a better sequence without all the major repositioning. I actually had four that we got through and I really wanted six, in total. I now know that was pretty unreasonable without assistance. Yes, in this school, I have "learned" that with all this added lighting capability, you need a whole lot better control of it.

    Name:  DSC6220-flip.jpg
Views: 222
Size:  269.0 KB

    I have another series of shots (one indoor and the other ... NOT) coming up on Tuesday, with only a two hour "studio window" to work with. As I looked down the "booking list", I am find I am having to fight STAFF for "studio time", not only students! I suppose it could be in support of the curriculum, as they teach the lighting and other courses in these rooms, also.

    Anyway, I am going for some one-sided "karate" action, "hi-ya!" ... and again, this may be too demanding for the time and lighting. Luckily, it is with another photographer (acting as the subject), so there will be some built-in help, just from that.

    Thanks for the comments, Frank.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 05-29-2010 at 12:00 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  8. #188
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Talking That special extra kick ...


    SONY a850 w SIGMA 24-70mm f/2.8 DG EX IF HSM
    @ 70mm - f/4 - 1/400th - ISO-400 - M - Hot Lights



    Yeah, the SIGMA 24-70 again ... w/ hot lights. 1/400th second! That's one fast movin' foot!

    Art School can be a little rough ...
    Last edited by DonSchap; 06-04-2010 at 06:26 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #189
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,760
    good thing you were'nt using the fisheye

  10. #190
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Smile Panoramic action w/ SIGMA 24-70mm f/2.8

    Another assignment has me doing a landscape panorama with people in it. Four young men decided to maraud through my scene, so there they are -> peoples for my panorama!

    Downtown Arlington Heights, at the Metra Station.

    Name:  Arlington-Hts-Panorama2.jpg
Views: 269
Size:  1.99 MB
    SONY α850 w/ SIGMA 24-70 f/2.8 DG EX IF HSM lens
    @ 26mm - f/10 - 1/400 sec - ISO-800 - Spot Meter - Manual Focus - M Mode - Natural lighting - 360 Panorama

    Last edited by DonSchap; 06-04-2010 at 09:08 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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