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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
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    10,424
    some nice compositions in that set. looks like you may have been rushing or overly excited cos like ryan pointed out some of them are just out of focus. not sure what the deal is with the guys outfit for an engagement shoot....but anyway...i digress...

    some suggestions...
    take some deep breaths when you try it again, you need to be calm and make sure you are nailing focus. remind yourself every few frames to calm down and slow down. if its OOF the shots screwed so remember how important that is.
    use your 70-300 as per above suggestion b4 you invest in anything else cos the first thing you;re gonna wanna do if you get even remotely serious is ditch that body.
    use your flash some more !!
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    80
    Wow, I don't guess I noticed those OOF shots... About the attire, they wanted "casual" shots for some reason. We are going to take a second outing now that we are back home and I think they are going to be a little more "dressed up." And the college "Alabama" polo that he is wearing matched the hound's tooth blouse (sp?) that she is wearing. Hounds tooth is associated with Paul "Bear" Bryant, and the hound's tooth hat he wore. Anyways, college football is kind of a part of life down in the south. I am not an Alabama fan, in fact quite the opposite.

    Anyways, back to the lens, I never really thought of the 70-300 as a portrait lens, I feel like I would be too far away from the action. I will have to try it next time I am out. I was thinking more along the lines of a 50mm but, I'm not sure how much I like the idea of having ONE focal length. Obviously it works, because they make the lens...

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Posts
    1,903
    Are you using Center Spot AF to lock focus on the eyes and then refocusing to center the shot?
    If so, try manually selecting AF points and you may get better results.
    Center spots is ideal if you are not re-framing or very little re-framing after locking the focus.
    That's been my experience anyway.
    Canon EOS 7D

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    FLUIDR

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    The 50mm is a great lens and it is fast. You just have to keep moving to frame the shot right. Remember to leave a little room to crop later if needed. I tend to shoot fast and not leave room. There is a lot to remember when shooting. I am always reminded when I post my images here.LOL Watch things in the background.

    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
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    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
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    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

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  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Carlsbad CA
    Posts
    523
    my vote is for the 50m f1.4
    Ive used my 50m for my nikon in almost every photshoot.
    sony A300
    tamron 17-50 2.8
    Sony SAL 11-18
    Sony 35 1.8

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Newcastle upon Tyne, England
    Posts
    51
    About this manual selection of AF points.... can you please explain how???

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,204
    Under the FN menu > AF Area> it's called "local focus". The other options are spot and wide.
    flickr

    Canon 7D - 5D | 550EX - 430EX II - (2) PW FlexTT5 | 24-105 f4L | 70-200 f2.8L IS | 100 f2.8L IS | 50 f1.8 II

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    Quote Originally Posted by jcray19 View Post
    ...........Anyways, back to the lens, I never really thought of the 70-300 as a portrait lens, I feel like I would be too far away from the action. I will have to try it next time I am out. I was thinking more along the lines of a 50mm but, I'm not sure how much I like the idea of having ONE focal length. Obviously it works, because they make the lens...
    By and large, Portrait Photographers tend to prefer the perspective of a longer lens, generally 85-135mm on FF (55-90mm on APS-C). Perspective is determined by distance between the camera and the subject and at 6ft or so the unflattering large nose syndrome comes into play so you should be at least that far away from your subject, although this is not "writ in stone". In portrait mode, to achieve a HFOV of 18" the shooting distance is 4'6"(50mm), 6'6"(70mm) and 9'(100mm) so the longer lens gives a better perspective and you're not sticking the lens in the Subjects face.

    For three quarter length shots the 50mm is fine and indoors the extra couple of stops of the f1.4/f1.7 lens is very useful. With the 70-300mm indoors you're going to need bounce flash

    Quote Originally Posted by Elisha82 View Post
    Are you using Center Spot AF to lock focus on the eyes and then refocusing to center the shot?
    If so, try manually selecting AF points and you may get better results.
    Center spots is ideal if you are not re-framing or very little re-framing after locking the focus.
    That's been my experience anyway.
    This is an interesting technical point. If you use the lock and re-compose method, the action of re-composing rotates the plane of focus away from the original point of focus resulting in some loss of sharpness. In the case of there being adequate DOF, this is not noticeable. At wide apertures, say using the 50mm f1.4/f1.7, you may well find that this de-focussing causes an unacceptable loss of sharpness in the subject. In this case the solution is to not reframe after focussing, but allow more space around the subject and crop to frame in post processing. Also you can use Elisha's local focus method but these AF points are less sensitive than the centre cross in a low light situation (just realised you have an A100 so I'm not certain of this).

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Monmouthshire, UK
    Posts
    2,152
    In an adjuct to the last point I made about focus shift when recomposing.
    The problem is solved for people with loadsa money. Whatever next?
    http://www.hasselblad.de/promotions/apl.aspx

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